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AE Lock

 
 
Bill Funk
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      10-25-2006
On Wed, 25 Oct 2006 10:37:59 GMT, "Lionel" <lionel http://www.velocityreviews.com/forums/(E-Mail Removed)>
wrote:

>Thanks to all who answered. The instruction book with the camera does not
>explain why one needs AE-L but your explanations certainly lightened my
>darkness.
>
>Cheers
>
>Lionel
>

Cameras, like a host of other devices, come with manuals that tell you
*how* to use the device, but not *why* to use it.
For the why, there are a host of other books; for example, a microwave
oven's manual will tell you how to use all of the various settings,
but it's up to you to determine why you would want to use them. For
that, there are microwave cookbooks.
For cameras, there are a host of books that explain why you use
certain settings. I strongly recommend that those who want to learn
more about why you would use certain settings or techniques read a few
of those "how to" photography books. Then, with practice, the
photographer can use the various settings and techniques to get the
picture that's intended.
--
Bill Funk
replace "g" with "a"
 
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Bucky
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      10-25-2006
Bill Funk wrote:
> Cameras, like a host of other devices, come with manuals that tell you
> *how* to use the device, but not *why* to use it.


That reminds me of the time that I got new stove/range, and while
reading the manual, I came across a section called Sabbath Mode. Even
after reading the entire section and understanding how it worked, I was
like, "WTF???"

 
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Craig M. Bobchin
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      10-25-2006
It's understandable why you might not be familiar with the reasoning for
that mode. It is primariliy for religous (Orthodox and some
conservatives) Jews who are forbidden to do any form of work (use of
electricity, or other mechanical/electronic devices are considered work)
on the Sabbath which runs from sundown Fri. to Sundown Sat..



In article <(E-Mail Removed) .com>,
(E-Mail Removed) says...
> That reminds me of the time that I got new stove/range, and while
> reading the manual, I came across a section called Sabbath Mode. Even
> after reading the entire section and understanding how it worked, I was
> like, "WTF???"
>
>

 
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John McWilliams
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      10-26-2006
> In article <(E-Mail Removed). com>,
> (E-Mail Removed) says...
>> That reminds me of the time that I got new stove/range, and while
>> reading the manual, I came across a section called Sabbath Mode. Even


Craig M. Bobchin wrote:

> It's understandable why you might not be familiar with the reasoning for
> that mode. It is primariliy for religous (Orthodox and some
> conservatives) Jews who are forbidden to do any form of work (use of
> electricity, or other mechanical/electronic devices are considered work)
> on the Sabbath which runs from sundown Fri. to Sundown Sat..



Well, what happens to a stove in that mode? Is operation locked out for
the observance?

--
John McWilliams
 
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Paul Rubin
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      10-26-2006
John McWilliams <(E-Mail Removed)> writes:
> > It's understandable why you might not be familiar with the reasoning
> > for that mode. It is primariliy for religous (Orthodox and some
> > conservatives) Jews who are forbidden to do any form of work (use of
> > electricity, or other mechanical/electronic devices are considered
> > work) on the Sabbath which runs from sundown Fri. to Sundown Sat..

>
> Well, what happens to a stove in that mode? Is operation locked out
> for the observance?


My guess is it turns itself on and off automatically according to a
timer that you set before the Sabbath begins. E.g., you leave some
food on top of it before sundown Friday and set it to turn itself on
at noon on Saturday, so you have a hot lunch without actually making a
fire during the Sabbath (since the machine has done it without your
intervention).
 
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Bucky
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      10-26-2006
Paul Rubin wrote:
> My guess is it turns itself on and off automatically according to a
> timer that you set before the Sabbath begins.


No, it's way more complicated than that. I remember reading the section
and thinking: I know this has something to do with Jewish observation
of Sabbath, but for the life of me I cannot deduce the Sabbath laws
based on the functionality. Here's the official explanation:

http://www.geconsumerproducts.com/pr...ts/sabbath.htm

 
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Paul Rubin
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      10-26-2006
"Bucky" <(E-Mail Removed)> writes:
> No, it's way more complicated than that. I remember reading the section
> and thinking: I know this has something to do with Jewish observation
> of Sabbath, but for the life of me I cannot deduce the Sabbath laws
> based on the functionality. Here's the official explanation:


Basically, Halacha (Jewish law) says you are not allowed to do any
work on the Sabbath, which traditionally included making or putting
out any type of fires. Rabbis in modern times have interpreted this
to include things like turning lights or appliances on and off
(turning on an electrical switch can make a spark). So for example,
some observant people remove the light bulbs from inside their
refrigerators, so they can open and close the door on Sabbath without
turning a light on and off. The idea of "Sabbath mode" for that stove
is that the stove does exactly what it's set to do ahead of time, and
nothing the user does during the Sabbath changes what the stove does.
So opening the oven door can't turn on an oven light, closing it won't
start the oven timer going, etc.

There are well known stories (I don't know if they're true) of some
observant people making a habit of removing their fridge's light bulb
on Friday before sundown and reinstalling it after Sabbath for use
during the rest of the week, instead of just removing it permanently
and doing without it. As the story goes, now and then someone with
this habit forgets to remove the bulb on Friday, then opens the fridge
on Saturday and the light comes on. That means they've committed a
minor violation of the Sabbath commandment by accident, not that big a
deal in the scheme of things. But if they now close the door (turning
the light off), they'll be breaking the Sabbath on purpose, a much
worse violation. So they have to leave the door open, and the food
spoils.

Despite stories like this, keeping the Sabbath is less crazy or
neurotic than it sounds. I'm not observant at all, but I sort of envy
those who are. The Sabbath is a time of enforced relaxation, where
you put your job and messing with computers and doing your taxes and
fussing over anything completely out of your existence and just enjoy
being with your family and friends. There is no serious temptation to
get a little more work done on that looming project, because doing
work of any kind is simply not allowed, short of literal life-or-death
emergencies.

Of course if you are not observant (or not Jewish), these prohibitions
don't affect you. You can turn lights on and off on Saturday. But a
properly observant person wouldn't be allowed to request it of you
(another topic of centuries of rabinnical discussion). That means in
a situation like the above, if you're with an observant person and you
think he'd like the lights to be turned on (or the fridge door closed
or whatever), you should go ahead and do it without being asked. In
some cases they will hint at what they want, but they can't come out
and ask for it.
 
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John McWilliams
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      10-26-2006
Paul Rubin wrote:
> "Bucky" <(E-Mail Removed)> writes:
>> No, it's way more complicated than that. I remember reading the section
>> and thinking: I know this has something to do with Jewish observation
>> of Sabbath, but for the life of me I cannot deduce the Sabbath laws
>> based on the functionality. Here's the official explanation:

>
> Basically, Halacha (Jewish law) says you are not allowed to do any
> work on the Sabbath, which traditionally included making or putting
> out any type of fires. Rabbis in modern times have interpreted this
> to include things like turning lights or appliances on and off
> (turning on an electrical switch can make a spark). So for example,
> some observant people remove the light bulbs from inside their
> refrigerators, so they can open and close the door on Sabbath without
> turning a light on and off. The idea of "Sabbath mode" for that stove
> is that the stove does exactly what it's set to do ahead of time, and
> nothing the user does during the Sabbath changes what the stove does.
> So opening the oven door can't turn on an oven light, closing it won't
> start the oven timer going, etc.
>
> There are well known stories (I don't know if they're true) of some
> observant people making a habit of removing their fridge's light bulb
> on Friday before sundown and reinstalling it after Sabbath for use
> during the rest of the week, instead of just removing it permanently
> and doing without it. As the story goes, now and then someone with
> this habit forgets to remove the bulb on Friday, then opens the fridge
> on Saturday and the light comes on. That means they've committed a
> minor violation of the Sabbath commandment by accident, not that big a
> deal in the scheme of things. But if they now close the door (turning
> the light off), they'll be breaking the Sabbath on purpose, a much
> worse violation. So they have to leave the door open, and the food
> spoils.
>
> Despite stories like this, keeping the Sabbath is less crazy or
> neurotic than it sounds. I'm not observant at all, but I sort of envy
> those who are. The Sabbath is a time of enforced relaxation, where
> you put your job and messing with computers and doing your taxes and
> fussing over anything completely out of your existence and just enjoy
> being with your family and friends. There is no serious temptation to
> get a little more work done on that looming project, because doing
> work of any kind is simply not allowed, short of literal life-or-death
> emergencies.
>
> Of course if you are not observant (or not Jewish), these prohibitions
> don't affect you. You can turn lights on and off on Saturday. But a
> properly observant person wouldn't be allowed to request it of you
> (another topic of centuries of rabinnical discussion). That means in
> a situation like the above, if you're with an observant person and you
> think he'd like the lights to be turned on (or the fridge door closed
> or whatever), you should go ahead and do it without being asked. In
> some cases they will hint at what they want, but they can't come out
> and ask for it.


Very interesting, and thank you. It's interesting how all religions I
know of get into some interesting places via the interpretation of a
rule or canon or observance.

Somehow I can't equate the turning on of a light switch as "work". Nor
making a fire, even, if you're freezing your tail off. Now, the wood
should have been chopped before, though.... <s>

--
john mcwilliams
 
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lubecki@hotmail.com
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      10-26-2006
Paul Rubin wrote:
> Of course if you are not observant (or not Jewish), these prohibitions
> don't affect you. You can turn lights on and off on Saturday. But a
> properly observant person wouldn't be allowed to request it of you
> (another topic of centuries of rabinnical discussion). That means in
> a situation like the above, if you're with an observant person and you
> think he'd like the lights to be turned on (or the fridge door closed
> or whatever), you should go ahead and do it without being asked. In
> some cases they will hint at what they want, but they can't come out
> and ask for it.


Yeah, at one point my parents had an observant Jewish woman as a
neighbor, and she arranged for my mom to come over on Friday nights and
turn on/off lights because she couldn't do that herself. And my mom had
to remember to do it, because the woman couldn't ask her to. A lot of
the ways people comply with the prohibitions strike me as pretty silly.
It looks like it's all about complying with only the letter of the law,
and finding loopholes wherever possible. Sort of like tricking your
deity on a technicality.

-Gniewko

 
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John Turco
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      10-27-2006
Paul Rubin wrote:
>
> John McWilliams <(E-Mail Removed)> writes:
> > > It's understandable why you might not be familiar with the reasoning
> > > for that mode. It is primariliy for religous (Orthodox and some
> > > conservatives) Jews who are forbidden to do any form of work (use of
> > > electricity, or other mechanical/electronic devices are considered
> > > work) on the Sabbath which runs from sundown Fri. to Sundown Sat..

> >
> > Well, what happens to a stove in that mode? Is operation locked out
> > for the observance?

>
> My guess is it turns itself on and off automatically according to a
> timer that you set before the Sabbath begins. E.g., you leave some
> food on top of it before sundown Friday and set it to turn itself on
> at noon on Saturday, so you have a hot lunch without actually making a
> fire during the Sabbath (since the machine has done it without your
> intervention).



Hello, Paul:

It's a bit early for April Fool's jokes, is it not?


Cordially,
John Turco <(E-Mail Removed)>
 
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