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D80 "limitation" of lower maximum shutter speed 1/4000?

 
 
Giovanni Azua
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      10-22-2006
Hi folks,

As stated in the review on http://www.dpreview.com/reviews/nikond80/
the single downgrade comparing D80 vs D70 & D70s is the slower
maximum shutter speed ... isn't it a downgrade to worry about? what
sort of situations one will not be able to creatively shoot with the new D80
that you could do using the D70(s)? i.e. anything fast enough as to require
1/8000 shutter speed? e.g. photograph a bullet perhaps? )

Thansk in advance,

Regards,
Giovanni





 
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Joseph Meehan
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      10-22-2006
Giovanni Azua wrote:
> Hi folks,
>
> As stated in the review on http://www.dpreview.com/reviews/nikond80/
> the single downgrade comparing D80 vs D70 & D70s is the slower
> maximum shutter speed ... isn't it a downgrade to worry about? what
> sort of situations one will not be able to creatively shoot with the
> new D80 that you could do using the D70(s)? i.e. anything fast enough
> as to require 1/8000 shutter speed? e.g. photograph a bullet perhaps?
> )
> Thansk in advance,
>
> Regards,
> Giovanni


While higher possible speeds are desirable, they may not apply to you.
High speed does help in stopping motion in many cases, but it also can be
handy in controlling light when you want a large aperture and short depth of
focus. However with the option to adjust sensitivity as well, that often
offers a backup method of obtaining large apertures in most situations.

--
Joseph Meehan

Dia duit


 
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Bill Hilton
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      10-22-2006
> Giovanni Azua wrote:
> Hi folks,
>
> As stated in the review on http://www.dpreview.com/reviews/nikond80/
> the single downgrade comparing D80 vs D70 & D70s is the slower
> maximum shutter speed ... isn't it a downgrade to worry about? what
> sort of situations one will not be able to creatively shoot with the new D80
> that you could do using the D70(s)? i.e. anything fast enough as to require
> 1/8000 shutter speed? e.g. photograph a bullet perhaps? )


My two Canon cameras have 1/8,000 th sec shutter speeds but I rarely
shoot at that setting. I'd say settling for 1/4,000 th sec instead of
1/8,000 th sec is something that will cause problems for very few
people and I surely wouldn't let that stop me from getting a certain
camera. It's just not a big deal IMO ...

Bill

 
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Paul Rubin
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      10-22-2006
"Giovanni Azua" <(E-Mail Removed)> writes:
> As stated in the review on http://www.dpreview.com/reviews/nikond80/
> the single downgrade comparing D80 vs D70 & D70s is the slower
> maximum shutter speed ... isn't it a downgrade to worry about?


No.
 
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ASAAR
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      10-22-2006
On Sun, 22 Oct 2006 14:57:26 +0200, Giovanni Azua wrote:

> As stated in the review on http://www.dpreview.com/reviews/nikond80/
> the single downgrade comparing D80 vs D70 & D70s is the slower
> maximum shutter speed ... isn't it a downgrade to worry about? what
> sort of situations one will not be able to creatively shoot with the new D80
> that you could do using the D70(s)? i.e. anything fast enough as to require
> 1/8000 shutter speed? e.g. photograph a bullet perhaps? )


A bullet would probably travel just as far across the frame
whether the shutter speed was 1/4000 or 1/8000th sec, since a focal
plane shutter is used, so that's not worth worrying about. What
does make a difference, IIRC, is that the reduced shutter speed is
due to the D80 using only a mechanical shutter, rather than a
combined mechanical/electronic shutter, which resulted in the D80
having a slower maximum (or min.?) flash synch. shutter speed than
previous Nikon DSLRs.

 
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Paul Rubin
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      10-22-2006
ASAAR <(E-Mail Removed)> writes:
> does make a difference, IIRC, is that the reduced shutter speed is
> due to the D80 using only a mechanical shutter, rather than a
> combined mechanical/electronic shutter, which resulted in the D80
> having a slower maximum (or min.?) flash synch. shutter speed than
> previous Nikon DSLRs.


Previous Nikon DSLR's including the D70 used a combined
mechanical/electronic shutter to get the higher flash speed??!! I
guess it's possible, but I hadn't heard it. I just figured it was
similar to the N8008 shutter or some descendent thereof.
 
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Bill Funk
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      10-22-2006
On Sun, 22 Oct 2006 11:56:45 -0400, ASAAR <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:

>On Sun, 22 Oct 2006 14:57:26 +0200, Giovanni Azua wrote:
>
>> As stated in the review on http://www.dpreview.com/reviews/nikond80/
>> the single downgrade comparing D80 vs D70 & D70s is the slower
>> maximum shutter speed ... isn't it a downgrade to worry about? what
>> sort of situations one will not be able to creatively shoot with the new D80
>> that you could do using the D70(s)? i.e. anything fast enough as to require
>> 1/8000 shutter speed? e.g. photograph a bullet perhaps? )

>
> A bullet would probably travel just as far across the frame
>whether the shutter speed was 1/4000 or 1/8000th sec, since a focal
>plane shutter is used, so that's not worth worrying about. What
>does make a difference, IIRC, is that the reduced shutter speed is
>due to the D80 using only a mechanical shutter, rather than a
>combined mechanical/electronic shutter, which resulted in the D80
>having a slower maximum (or min.?) flash synch. shutter speed than
>previous Nikon DSLRs.


I love this ****!
A "High Velocity" (or normal).22lr round has a muzzle velocity of
1125 ft/sec.
Or, 3.375 inches per 1/4000sec exposure. Not exactly bullet-stopping
performance.
The cameras that stop bullets in flight are very high speed.
--
Bill Funk
replace "g" with "a"
 
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Roger N. Clark (change username to rnclark)
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      10-22-2006
Bill Hilton wrote:

>>Giovanni Azua wrote:
>>Hi folks,
>>
>>As stated in the review on http://www.dpreview.com/reviews/nikond80/
>>the single downgrade comparing D80 vs D70 & D70s is the slower
>>maximum shutter speed ... isn't it a downgrade to worry about? what
>>sort of situations one will not be able to creatively shoot with the new D80
>>that you could do using the D70(s)? i.e. anything fast enough as to require
>>1/8000 shutter speed? e.g. photograph a bullet perhaps? )

>
>
> My two Canon cameras have 1/8,000 th sec shutter speeds but I rarely
> shoot at that setting. I'd say settling for 1/4,000 th sec instead of
> 1/8,000 th sec is something that will cause problems for very few
> people and I surely wouldn't let that stop me from getting a certain
> camera. It's just not a big deal IMO ...
>
> Bill
>

Bill,
I agree. When I got the 1D Mark II, I thought great, now no more
1/4000 sec limit. But I casually looked through some images and
couldn't find one faster than 1/4000. I do remember hitting that
limit on my 10D occasionally, like this one at the limit:
http://www.clarkvision.com/galleries...728.b-600.html
but I just closed the aperture down a little. On a power stroke
on a white bird in sunlight, 1/4000 second may not be enough to
freeze the wingtips, but then a little blur in the wingtips
does show action.

Roger
 
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Bill Hilton
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      10-22-2006
>Bill Funk wrote:
>
> I love this ****!
> A "High Velocity" (or normal).22lr round has a muzzle velocity of
> 1125 ft/sec.
> Or, 3.375 inches per 1/4000sec exposure. Not exactly bullet-stopping
> performance.


Point well taken

> The cameras that stop bullets in flight are very high speed.


All the images I've seen that stopped bullets in flight were taken with
flash, typically set so the bullet crossing the plane tripped the flash
.... the short duration of the flash is what freezes the bullet, not the
shutter speed.

Bill

 
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ASAAR
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      10-22-2006
On 22 Oct 2006 09:10:20 -0700, Paul Rubin
<http://(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:

>> does make a difference, IIRC, is that the reduced shutter speed is
>> due to the D80 using only a mechanical shutter, rather than a
>> combined mechanical/electronic shutter, which resulted in the D80
>> having a slower maximum (or min.?) flash synch. shutter speed than
>> previous Nikon DSLRs.

>
> Previous Nikon DSLR's including the D70 used a combined
> mechanical/electronic shutter to get the higher flash speed??!! I
> guess it's possible, but I hadn't heard it. I just figured it was
> similar to the N8008 shutter or some descendent thereof.


I don't know if *all* previous Nikon DSLRs used combined shutters,
but I'm pretty sure that of those that did, the D70 was one. I'm
checking dpreview now (where I probably read it) and so far I see
that the D80's flash synch tops out at 1/200 vs 1/500 for the D70
and that the D80's shutter is a "Mechanical only shutter (maximum
1/4000 sec, flash sync to 1/200 sec)" and this:

> Compared to the Nikon D70s, major feature and specification differences
>
> As you can see from the table below the D80 carries some quite significant
> improvements compared to the D70s, the only slight negative point being
> slightly slower maximum shutter speed and flash sync (this due to a lack
> of an electronic shutter).

http://www.dpreview.com/reviews/nikond80/

. . . confirmed in dpreview's D70 review:

> • Combined mechanical and CCD electronic shutter
> • 30 to 1/8000 sec



I believe that the built-in flash is more versatile than that of
the D70 when used in commander mode, and here I'm straining to
recall the difference, but it might be that the D80 can control
multiple groups of flashes. Another difference between them is that
the D70 has a USB 2.0 Full Speed port, so it transfers files much
slower than the D80's USB 2.0 High Speed allows, which was tested at
up to 8.8 MB/sec.


 
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