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New Foto Tip by Mark Alberhasy - A Perspective on Lenses

 
 
Hanna Lahy
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      10-23-2006

"Mr.T" <MrT@home> wrote in message
news:453c6036$0$21086$(E-Mail Removed) u...
> "Herb Ludwig" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
> news:JKr_g.324709$(E-Mail Removed)...
>> When one wants to enhance the size of distant mountains, the condensed
>> perspective of a tele lens is certainly the way to go. My personal taste

> for
>> landscape images goes rather in the opposite, wide-angle direction, where
>> the foreground subject is emphazised and the feeling of depth enhanced.
>> Therefore my preference and reliance on the 17-40 f4 Zoom.
>> Here is an example of the kind of image I strive to emulate:
>> http://www.pbase.com/paskuk/image/65952350

>
> Funny then that that shot has little foreground detail. Whilst it's quite
> an
> OK shot, why would you have to "strive" to emulate it? Are you suggesting
> you could not do as well, in the same location, for some reason?
>
> MrT.



This beautiful wide-angle shot documents exactly the characteristics and
qualities alluded to. Namely, foreground emphasized and the feeling of depth
enhanced. A true masterpiece of composition, light and perspective!
I guess, if you can't see this, any more worde are wasted.

















;


 
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Mr.T
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      10-24-2006

"Hanna Lahy" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
news:5R8%g.107014$(E-Mail Removed)...
> This beautiful wide-angle shot documents exactly the characteristics and
> qualities alluded to. Namely, foreground emphasized and the feeling of

depth
> enhanced. A true masterpiece of composition, light and perspective!
> I guess, if you can't see this, any more worde are wasted.


Yes, since art is very much a personal thing. To my mind some real
foreground detail (say if the rocks were closer for example) *would*
emphasize the feeling of depth, which IMO it is not in this picture. But as
I already stated, it is quite OK as is, and you are welcome to prefer it
even. What is not apparent to me though, is why you couldn't do as well from
the same location, or think that I can't?

MrT.


 
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Hanna Lahy
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      10-24-2006

"Mr.T" <MrT@home> wrote
(SNIP)
>But as I already stated, it is quite OK as is, and you are welcome to
>prefer it
> even. What is not apparent to me though, is why you couldn't do as well
> from
> the same location, or think that I can't?
> MrT.




Where do you get this notion from? Actually, Herb Ludwig says the opposite
of what you are saying he says! You seem to be confused about the meaning of
the word "emulate".
My dictionary (Merriam-Webster Unabridged, Vers2.5_2000) defines it this
way:

EMULATE
transitive verb
1 a : to strive to equal or excel : with the intention of equaling or
outdoing



 
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Alan LeHun
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      10-24-2006
In article <453dba4b$0$21086$(E-Mail Removed)> , MrT@home
says...
> What is not apparent to me though, is why you couldn't do as well from
> the same location, or think that I can't?
>


Finding the right location is almost half the art. A step or two
backwards or to the right, is a different location and a different
photo.

Finding the right time is also almost half the art.

Some people are waaay better at this than others and I am desperately
envious of them.

--
Alan LeHun
 
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Mr.T
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      10-25-2006

"Hanna Lahy" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
news:9il%g.110222$(E-Mail Removed)...
> (SNIP)
> >But as I already stated, it is quite OK as is, and you are welcome to
> >prefer it
> > even. What is not apparent to me though, is why you couldn't do as well
> > from
> > the same location, or think that I can't?

>
>
> Where do you get this notion from? Actually, Herb Ludwig says the opposite
> of what you are saying he says! You seem to be confused about the meaning

of
> the word "emulate".
> My dictionary (Merriam-Webster Unabridged, Vers2.5_2000) defines it this
> way:
>
> EMULATE
> transitive verb
> 1 a : to strive to equal or excel : with the intention of equaling or
> outdoing


What the hell are you on about? The word used was "strive" in the first
place. Where have I said any different?

MrT.


 
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Mr.T
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      10-25-2006

"Alan LeHun" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
news:(E-Mail Removed)...
> Finding the right location is almost half the art. A step or two
> backwards or to the right, is a different location and a different
> photo.
>
> Finding the right time is also almost half the art.
>
> Some people are waaay better at this than others and I am desperately
> envious of them.


Exactly, being in the right place at the right time is part of the art
(combined with a degree of luck). However I am not envious at all. Being
able to do it depends to a large extent on how much you desire that shot.
Being able to pay all the expenses, hike for miles, buy and carry the
necessary equipment, get out of bed early, spend the necessary number of
days etc. is a measure of your desire and commitment, not of your
photographic ability.
Naturally the best photo's require both skill and commitment, and usually a
fair amount of luck. And even skill is part artistic ability, and part
technical ability.
Of course some people have no ability whatsoever, but I do not include them
in this discussion. And remember there is far more to photography than
landscapes.

MrT.


 
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Hanna Lahy
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      10-25-2006

"Mr.T" <MrT@home> wrote
> Exactly, being in the right place at the right time is part of the art
> (combined with a degree of luck). However I am not envious at all. Being
> able to do it depends to a large extent on how much you desire that shot.
> Being able to pay all the expenses, hike for miles, buy and carry the
> necessary equipment, get out of bed early, spend the necessary number of
> days etc. is a measure of your desire and commitment, not of your
> photographic ability.
> Naturally the best photo's require both skill and commitment, and usually
> a
> fair amount of luck. And even skill is part artistic ability, and part
> technical ability.
> Of course some people have no ability whatsoever, but I do not include
> them
> in this discussion. And remember there is far more to photography than
> landscapes.
>
> MrT.




Hmmm, now you made me curious. Do you care to provide a link or post one of
your photos here so that we know what you are talking so cogently about ?


 
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Guy
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      10-28-2006


Herb Ludwig wrote:
> "Mike Fields" <spam_me_not_mr.gadget2@comcastDOTnet> wrote:
>
>>I have seen more people bitten with the foreground/background
>>thing. Out in the open country somewhere with a beautiful
>>mountain backdrop, they shoot the picture of someone from
>>up close with the wide angle then notice when they get home
>>the "magnificent mountain scenery" that was there when they
>>took the picture is just a couple of little bumps behind their
>>subject. Always the same comment "gee I don't understand,
>>the mountains looked so much bigger when we were there".
>>Step back even 10 feet, zoom in a bit to frame the subject
>>and voila - the mountains are there !! (unless you live in
>>Kansas, in which case, there is no hope for mountains .. )

>
>
>
> When one wants to enhance the size of distant mountains, the condensed
> perspective of a tele lens is certainly the way to go. My personal taste for
> landscape images goes rather in the opposite, wide-angle direction, where
> the foreground subject is emphazised and the feeling of depth enhanced.
> Therefore my preference and reliance on the 17-40 f4 Zoom.
> Here is an example of the kind of image I strive to emulate:
> http://www.pbase.com/paskuk/image/65952350
>
> Cheers,
> Hank
>
>


Hank - I just have to suck up a little here... awesome scenery and
beautiful shots. I never would have guessed Heather was so pretty. I
have got to start traveling. -Guy

 
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