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Photoshop CS2 and RAM?

 
 
David Littlewood
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Posts: n/a
 
      11-05-2006
In article <(E-Mail Removed)>, Bill Funk
<(E-Mail Removed)> writes
>On Fri, 20 Oct 2006 22:59:04 -0700, John McWilliams
><(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
>
>>Gary C wrote:
>>> "David Littlewood" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
>>> news:(E-Mail Removed)...
>>>
>>>> I think you need to re-read what Roy wrote. Your wiring must be
>>>> dangerously unconventional if the PC is still powered when turned off at
>>>> the wall socket.
>>>
>>> Us yanks, have nothing on a wall socket to turn off.

>>
>>We who live in Yankee-land generally have switches on the wall that
>>operate the wall sockets, as if it made a lot of diff.

>
>I live in the US (is that "Yankee-land"?), and I know that in
>relatively recent homes (built in the last several decades?), there's
>a wall switch in most rooms that control one outlet (the 'light
>switch'), but only that one outlet.
>The rest of the outlets aren't wall-switch-controlled, to the best of
>my knowledge.
>Where are your wall switches trhat control your outlets?


OK guys, I started a bit of a hare on this.

In the UK, with our definitely more lethal 230V mains supply, the supply
sockets are much more substantial (and well made). All, by law, have a
continuous earth circuit. Many, though not all, have a switch which
disconnects the power supply lines, but not the earth.

Thus, if you are fortunate enough to have such sockets, the best method
of protecting a computer is to leave it plugged in but switched off at
the socket. That way there is not the remotest possibility of power
getting to any part of the computer, but the metal chassis is still
earthed.

OTOH, if you live in the USA, you will probably have to make alternative
arrangements for earthing. Many sockets are not even earthed, never mind
switched.

Since Roy G was clearly referring to the same set-up as I describe, and
Bill Crocker was implying it was incorrect. I stepped in to disagree.
Nothing we said would apply to an unswitched wall socket, or one without
an earth circuit. About time you people in Yankee (and Dixie) land got
some decent sockets though - I just got back from 2 weeks in S America
(same kind of sockets) and they are utter crap.

David
--
David Littlewood
 
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MarkČ
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Posts: n/a
 
      11-05-2006
David Littlewood wrote:
> In article <(E-Mail Removed)>, Bill Funk
> <(E-Mail Removed)> writes
>> On Fri, 20 Oct 2006 22:59:04 -0700, John McWilliams
>> <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
>>
>>> Gary C wrote:
>>>> "David Littlewood" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
>>>> news:(E-Mail Removed)...
>>>>
>>>>> I think you need to re-read what Roy wrote. Your wiring must be
>>>>> dangerously unconventional if the PC is still powered when turned
>>>>> off at the wall socket.
>>>>
>>>> Us yanks, have nothing on a wall socket to turn off.
>>>
>>> We who live in Yankee-land generally have switches on the wall that
>>> operate the wall sockets, as if it made a lot of diff.

>>
>> I live in the US (is that "Yankee-land"?), and I know that in
>> relatively recent homes (built in the last several decades?), there's
>> a wall switch in most rooms that control one outlet (the 'light
>> switch'), but only that one outlet.
>> The rest of the outlets aren't wall-switch-controlled, to the best of
>> my knowledge.
>> Where are your wall switches trhat control your outlets?

>
> OK guys, I started a bit of a hare on this.
>
> In the UK, with our definitely more lethal 230V mains supply, the
> supply sockets are much more substantial (and well made). All, by
> law, have a continuous earth circuit. Many, though not all, have a
> switch which disconnects the power supply lines, but not the earth.
>
> Thus, if you are fortunate enough to have such sockets, the best
> method of protecting a computer is to leave it plugged in but
> switched off at the socket. That way there is not the remotest
> possibility of power getting to any part of the computer, but the
> metal chassis is still earthed.


US translation:
Earthed=Grounded

Earth=Ground wire

> OTOH, if you live in the USA, you will probably have to make
> alternative arrangements for earthing. Many sockets are not even
> earthed, never mind switched.
>
> Since Roy G was clearly referring to the same set-up as I describe,
> and Bill Crocker was implying it was incorrect. I stepped in to
> disagree. Nothing we said would apply to an unswitched wall socket,
> or one without an earth circuit. About time you people in Yankee (and
> Dixie) land got some decent sockets though - I just got back from 2
> weeks in S America (same kind of sockets) and they are utter crap.
>
> David


Where in S. America were you?
I was born in Bogota', Colombia...

--
Images (Plus Snaps & Grabs) by MarkČ at:
www.pbase.com/markuson


 
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David Littlewood
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Posts: n/a
 
      11-05-2006
In article <N5s3h.1699$(E-Mail Removed)>, MarkČ
<mjmorgan@cox.?.net.invalid> writes
>David Littlewood wrote:
>>
>> OK guys, I started a bit of a hare on this.
>>
>> In the UK, with our definitely more lethal 230V mains supply, the
>> supply sockets are much more substantial (and well made). All, by
>> law, have a continuous earth circuit. Many, though not all, have a
>> switch which disconnects the power supply lines, but not the earth.
>>
>> Thus, if you are fortunate enough to have such sockets, the best
>> method of protecting a computer is to leave it plugged in but
>> switched off at the socket. That way there is not the remotest
>> possibility of power getting to any part of the computer, but the
>> metal chassis is still earthed.

>
>US translation:
>Earthed=Grounded
>
>Earth=Ground wire
>
>> OTOH, if you live in the USA, you will probably have to make
>> alternative arrangements for earthing. Many sockets are not even
>> earthed, never mind switched.
>>
>> Since Roy G was clearly referring to the same set-up as I describe,
>> and Bill Crocker was implying it was incorrect. I stepped in to
>> disagree. Nothing we said would apply to an unswitched wall socket,
>> or one without an earth circuit. About time you people in Yankee (and
>> Dixie) land got some decent sockets though - I just got back from 2
>> weeks in S America (same kind of sockets) and they are utter crap.
>>
>> David

>
>Where in S. America were you?
>I was born in Bogota', Colombia...
>

Ecuador, mostly in Quito and nearby. Great country. Visiting my
daughter, who spent a couple of months in Colombia this Summer and loved
it, but we didn't get there.

David
--
David Littlewood
 
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MarkČ
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      11-06-2006
David Littlewood wrote:
> In article <N5s3h.1699$(E-Mail Removed)>, MarkČ
> <mjmorgan@cox.?.net.invalid> writes
>> David Littlewood wrote:
>>>
>>> OK guys, I started a bit of a hare on this.
>>>
>>> In the UK, with our definitely more lethal 230V mains supply, the
>>> supply sockets are much more substantial (and well made). All, by
>>> law, have a continuous earth circuit. Many, though not all, have a
>>> switch which disconnects the power supply lines, but not the earth.
>>>
>>> Thus, if you are fortunate enough to have such sockets, the best
>>> method of protecting a computer is to leave it plugged in but
>>> switched off at the socket. That way there is not the remotest
>>> possibility of power getting to any part of the computer, but the
>>> metal chassis is still earthed.

>>
>> US translation:
>> Earthed=Grounded
>>
>> Earth=Ground wire
>>
>>> OTOH, if you live in the USA, you will probably have to make
>>> alternative arrangements for earthing. Many sockets are not even
>>> earthed, never mind switched.
>>>
>>> Since Roy G was clearly referring to the same set-up as I describe,
>>> and Bill Crocker was implying it was incorrect. I stepped in to
>>> disagree. Nothing we said would apply to an unswitched wall socket,
>>> or one without an earth circuit. About time you people in Yankee
>>> (and Dixie) land got some decent sockets though - I just got back
>>> from 2 weeks in S America (same kind of sockets) and they are utter
>>> crap. David

>>
>> Where in S. America were you?
>> I was born in Bogota', Colombia...
>>

> Ecuador, mostly in Quito and nearby. Great country. Visiting my
> daughter, who spent a couple of months in Colombia this Summer and
> loved it, but we didn't get there.


I remember walking the painted line in Equador that represented the equator
as a kid. Beautiful place, Equador. Colombia has become so violent that
it's now nearly impossible to visit the rural area where I grew up. My dad
was on one of many hit-lists while there, and two of our close friends were
kidnapped by the gorilla group, "M19." -One of them was murdered after
being held captive for over two years. Thankfully, the situation in Equador
hasn't been nearly as violent...

--
Images (Plus Snaps & Grabs) by MarkČ at:
www.pbase.com/markuson


 
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David Littlewood
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      11-06-2006
In article <%7w3h.2246$(E-Mail Removed)>, MarkČ
<mjmorgan@cox.?.net.invalid> writes
>David Littlewood wrote:
>> In article <N5s3h.1699$(E-Mail Removed)>, MarkČ
>> <mjmorgan@cox.?.net.invalid> writes
>>>
>>> Where in S. America were you?
>>> I was born in Bogota', Colombia...
>>>

>> Ecuador, mostly in Quito and nearby. Great country. Visiting my
>> daughter, who spent a couple of months in Colombia this Summer and
>> loved it, but we didn't get there.

>
>I remember walking the painted line in Equador that represented the equator
>as a kid. Beautiful place, Equador. Colombia has become so violent that
>it's now nearly impossible to visit the rural area where I grew up. My dad
>was on one of many hit-lists while there, and two of our close friends were
>kidnapped by the gorilla group, "M19." -One of them was murdered after
>being held captive for over two years. Thankfully, the situation in Equador
>hasn't been nearly as violent...
>

I think they have now discovered that the painted line is a few hundred
meters adrift of the equator - and that they found some pre-Incan
remains on the correct equatorial line which suggest that those guys
knew its significance. All a bit anecdotal and not researched though.

My daughter tells me that Colombia has made great efforts in the last
2-3 years to improve security in general, and especially for tourists.
Seems that FARC and the other organisations have realised that even they
are harmed by kidnapping or otherwise interfering with visitors.
Whatever, she said she, and others she met, felt the place was fairly
safe. She especially loved Bogota and Cartagena. Still, may not protect
Gringos against whom there is some specific old grudge, I suppose.

We risk being told off for getting wildly OT, I think!

Regards,

David
--
David Littlewood
 
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Ron Hunter
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      11-06-2006
David Littlewood wrote:
> In article <(E-Mail Removed)>, Bill Funk
> <(E-Mail Removed)> writes
>> On Fri, 20 Oct 2006 22:59:04 -0700, John McWilliams
>> <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
>>
>>> Gary C wrote:
>>>> "David Littlewood" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
>>>> news:(E-Mail Removed)...
>>>>
>>>>> I think you need to re-read what Roy wrote. Your wiring must be
>>>>> dangerously unconventional if the PC is still powered when turned
>>>>> off at
>>>>> the wall socket.
>>>>
>>>> Us yanks, have nothing on a wall socket to turn off.
>>>
>>> We who live in Yankee-land generally have switches on the wall that
>>> operate the wall sockets, as if it made a lot of diff.

>>
>> I live in the US (is that "Yankee-land"?), and I know that in
>> relatively recent homes (built in the last several decades?), there's
>> a wall switch in most rooms that control one outlet (the 'light
>> switch'), but only that one outlet.
>> The rest of the outlets aren't wall-switch-controlled, to the best of
>> my knowledge.
>> Where are your wall switches trhat control your outlets?

>
> OK guys, I started a bit of a hare on this.
>
> In the UK, with our definitely more lethal 230V mains supply, the supply
> sockets are much more substantial (and well made). All, by law, have a
> continuous earth circuit. Many, though not all, have a switch which
> disconnects the power supply lines, but not the earth.
>
> Thus, if you are fortunate enough to have such sockets, the best method
> of protecting a computer is to leave it plugged in but switched off at
> the socket. That way there is not the remotest possibility of power
> getting to any part of the computer, but the metal chassis is still
> earthed.
>
> OTOH, if you live in the USA, you will probably have to make alternative
> arrangements for earthing. Many sockets are not even earthed, never mind
> switched.
>
> Since Roy G was clearly referring to the same set-up as I describe, and
> Bill Crocker was implying it was incorrect. I stepped in to disagree.
> Nothing we said would apply to an unswitched wall socket, or one without
> an earth circuit. About time you people in Yankee (and Dixie) land got
> some decent sockets though - I just got back from 2 weeks in S America
> (same kind of sockets) and they are utter crap.
>
> David

When I rebuilt my home about 16 years ago, a room was designed to hold
my computer equipment, and the electrical outlets were specially
grounded as for a commercial installation. In older US homes, one can
not be sure of proper grounding, or even ANY grounding. My old wiring
was really strange, with one of the circuits coming off one leg of 220
volts, and the other coming from the other leg. Certainly NOT to any
code extant when the house was built in 1953! All the wiring now is in
excess of local codes, and properly inspected. I recommend having an
electrician check any suspicious sockets for proper grounding before
using them for a computer.
 
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Jack Mac
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      11-06-2006
On Mon, 06 Nov 2006 05:12:58 -0600, Ron Hunter <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:

>David Littlewood wrote:
>> In article <(E-Mail Removed)>, Bill Funk
>> <(E-Mail Removed)> writes
>>> On Fri, 20 Oct 2006 22:59:04 -0700, John McWilliams
>>> <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
>>>
>>>> Gary C wrote:
>>>>> "David Littlewood" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
>>>>> news:(E-Mail Removed)...
>>>>>
>>>>>> I think you need to re-read what Roy wrote. Your wiring must be
>>>>>> dangerously unconventional if the PC is still powered when turned
>>>>>> off at
>>>>>> the wall socket.
>>>>>
>>>>> Us yanks, have nothing on a wall socket to turn off.
>>>>
>>>> We who live in Yankee-land generally have switches on the wall that
>>>> operate the wall sockets, as if it made a lot of diff.
>>>
>>> I live in the US (is that "Yankee-land"?), and I know that in
>>> relatively recent homes (built in the last several decades?), there's
>>> a wall switch in most rooms that control one outlet (the 'light
>>> switch'), but only that one outlet.
>>> The rest of the outlets aren't wall-switch-controlled, to the best of
>>> my knowledge.
>>> Where are your wall switches trhat control your outlets?

>>
>> OK guys, I started a bit of a hare on this.
>>
>> In the UK, with our definitely more lethal 230V mains supply, the supply
>> sockets are much more substantial (and well made). All, by law, have a
>> continuous earth circuit. Many, though not all, have a switch which
>> disconnects the power supply lines, but not the earth.
>>
>> Thus, if you are fortunate enough to have such sockets, the best method
>> of protecting a computer is to leave it plugged in but switched off at
>> the socket. That way there is not the remotest possibility of power
>> getting to any part of the computer, but the metal chassis is still
>> earthed.
>>
>> OTOH, if you live in the USA, you will probably have to make alternative
>> arrangements for earthing. Many sockets are not even earthed, never mind
>> switched.
>>
>> Since Roy G was clearly referring to the same set-up as I describe, and
>> Bill Crocker was implying it was incorrect. I stepped in to disagree.
>> Nothing we said would apply to an unswitched wall socket, or one without
>> an earth circuit. About time you people in Yankee (and Dixie) land got
>> some decent sockets though - I just got back from 2 weeks in S America
>> (same kind of sockets) and they are utter crap.
>>
>> David

>When I rebuilt my home about 16 years ago, a room was designed to hold
>my computer equipment, and the electrical outlets were specially
>grounded as for a commercial installation. In older US homes, one can
>not be sure of proper grounding, or even ANY grounding. My old wiring
>was really strange, with one of the circuits coming off one leg of 220
>volts, and the other coming from the other leg. Certainly NOT to any
>code extant when the house was built in 1953! All the wiring now is in
>excess of local codes, and properly inspected. I recommend having an
>electrician check any suspicious sockets for proper grounding before
>using them for a computer.


A better solution to that is an adequately sized UPS. That completely
isolates the computer from the house wiring. Also keeps the computer
running for short power failures.

Jack Mac
 
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MarkČ
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      11-07-2006
David Littlewood wrote:
> In article <%7w3h.2246$(E-Mail Removed)>, MarkČ
> <mjmorgan@cox.?.net.invalid> writes
>> David Littlewood wrote:
>>> In article <N5s3h.1699$(E-Mail Removed)>, MarkČ
>>> <mjmorgan@cox.?.net.invalid> writes
>>>>
>>>> Where in S. America were you?
>>>> I was born in Bogota', Colombia...
>>>>
>>> Ecuador, mostly in Quito and nearby. Great country. Visiting my
>>> daughter, who spent a couple of months in Colombia this Summer and
>>> loved it, but we didn't get there.

>>
>> I remember walking the painted line in Equador that represented the
>> equator as a kid. Beautiful place, Equador. Colombia has become so
>> violent that it's now nearly impossible to visit the rural area
>> where I grew up. My dad was on one of many hit-lists while there,
>> and two of our close friends were kidnapped by the gorilla group,
>> "M19." -One of them was murdered after being held captive for over
>> two years. Thankfully, the situation in Equador hasn't been nearly
>> as violent...

> I think they have now discovered that the painted line is a few
> hundred meters adrift of the equator - and that they found some
> pre-Incan remains on the correct equatorial line which suggest that
> those guys knew its significance. All a bit anecdotal and not
> researched though.
> My daughter tells me that Colombia has made great efforts in the last
> 2-3 years to improve security in general, and especially for tourists.
> Seems that FARC and the other organisations have realised that even
> they are harmed by kidnapping or otherwise interfering with visitors.
> Whatever, she said she, and others she met, felt the place was fairly
> safe. She especially loved Bogota and Cartagena. Still, may not
> protect Gringos against whom there is some specific old grudge, I
> suppose.
> We risk being told off for getting wildly OT, I think!


My dad took a lot of photos <g> where we lived down there, but nearly all of
them were lost when my house burned to the ground. About violence... We
lived far from any city...out where a short drive would take you to coffee
and "other" plants. The problem for us was that FARC (and others, like the
M19) always believed we were somehow associated with the CIA, and anti-drug
organizations from the US (which we were not, of course), so they always
felt we were a threat. In the very rural areas where we lived, you rarely
saw law enforcement ( I never saw one where I lived) but would often see
guys who clearly were armed by gorila groups. While Bogota may have
improved in recent years, the rural areas are still largely controlled by
non-govt. guys with guns. We still have friends working there, though
they now fly primarily out of Bogota.

About Cartagena... I got the worst sunburn of my LIFE at the beaches
there... I remember that my dad bought an ENTIRE GUNNY SACK of lobsters
for peanuts...and we ate them all.

-Mark
--
Images (Plus Snaps & Grabs) by MarkČ at:
www.pbase.com/markuson


 
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Thomas T. Veldhouse
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Posts: n/a
 
      11-07-2006
sally <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
> In article <(E-Mail Removed) .com>,
> PeteD <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
>>I'm thinking of buying CS2 (I have PS6). I'm concerned about RAM
>>requirements. I have a 2.4GHz P4 with 512Mb RAM. I suspect a memory
>>upgrade may be tricky due to the age of the PC.

>
> Memory usage depends a lot on the sizes of the images you are editing.
> If your images are 640x480 or so, then performance won't be too bad on
> your machine. If you want good performance when editing 5MP images,
> then more memory and a faster CPU will make a very noticable difference.


I edit 100MB scanned TIFF files on my machine, which is a Dell 8250 3.06GHz
(HT) with 1GB RAMBUS 1066. It can be a little slow if I end up with several
files open or a lot of "undo" or "layer" data, but it isn't too bad. My
workflow is entirely 16-bit until I generate the file to print.

--
Thomas T. Veldhouse
Key Fingerprint: D281 77A5 63EE 82C5 5E68 00E4 7868 0ADC 4EFB 39F0


 
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Bill
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      11-07-2006
"Jack Mac" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
news:(E-Mail Removed)...
>
>>When I rebuilt my home about 16 years ago, a room was designed to
>>hold
>>my computer equipment, and the electrical outlets were specially
>>grounded as for a commercial installation. In older US homes, one
>>can
>>not be sure of proper grounding, or even ANY grounding. My old
>>wiring
>>was really strange, with one of the circuits coming off one leg of
>>220
>>volts, and the other coming from the other leg. Certainly NOT to
>>any
>>code extant when the house was built in 1953!


Here in Canada, the neutral and ground are tied together at the
utility box, with a direct grounding wire run to an earthing rod
(which is often the copper pipe for the municipal water supply). Of
course, that only applies to more recent buildings in the last 20
years. A home from 1953 might not be wired properly.

> All the wiring now is in
>>excess of local codes, and properly inspected. I recommend having
>>an
>>electrician check any suspicious sockets for proper grounding before
>>using them for a computer.


Or use a $5 tester from the local electrical shop.



The little plug-in tester will visually indicate if the ground is
open, if the hot and neutral are reversed, if the neutral is open,
etc. Much cheaper than calling an electrician to check the circuits in
your home. If you find a bad circuit with the tester you can then call
an electrician to take care of it.

> A better solution to that is an adequately sized UPS. That
> completely
> isolates the computer from the house wiring. Also keeps the computer
> running for short power failures.


Note that it depends on the UPS design.

Many are simply standby or "offline" units that pass the utility power
straight through with little more than some noise filtering, basic
surge protection, and perhaps voltage regulation. The backup battery
power is only activated and switched in automatically when the utility
power fails or sags below a specified voltage level.

The better and more expensive models are called "online" units that
use an inverter 100% of the time and isolate the utility power from
the computer through the battery circuits. The batteries and inverter
are used all the time to supply power, and the utility power is used
only to maintain the charge in the batteries. These models typically
have better noise and surge protection, have very stable voltage
levels, and have instant power transfer since there is no switching
circuit.

There are other factors involved, but for computers which have very
robust power supplies, the basic standby UPS is usually more than
adequate.

I have three UPS units in my home. An online unit for the computers, a
standby for the home theater, and another small standby to backup the
TV and alarm clock in the bedroom (never been late for work!).

 
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