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DSLR choices?? help please

 
 
David J Taylor
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      08-24-2006
Adrian Boliston wrote:
[]
> The whole "experience" of using a DSLR is totally different frfom a
> P&S camera:
>
> No more fiddling around with complex menus to get it to do what you
> want - controls are at your fingertips. (WB, ISO, metering mode etc)
> Being able to set aperture or shutter speed while looking through the
> viewfinder.
> Not having to hold the thing at arms's length looking at a grainy LCD
> "preview"
> No more fiddling with a useless "zoom button" - you actually get to
> control the zoom via a zoom ring.
> You get a proper "click" when you take the photo, rather than with a
> P&S when you are never really sure when it has actually taken the
> shot!
> Cheers - Adrian www.boliston.co.uk


Adrian,

You should try one of the ZLR cameras - you can set the shutter speed etc.
while looking through the EVF, and the camera doesn't need to be held away
from the body. Having a loud "clunk" noise when you take a picture isn't
always an advantage!

David


 
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ASAAR
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      08-24-2006
On Thu, 24 Aug 2006 06:41:41 GMT, David J Taylor wrote:

>> You get a proper "click" when you take the photo, rather than with a
>> P&S when you are never really sure when it has actually taken the
>> shot!
>> Cheers - Adrian www.boliston.co.uk

>
> Adrian,
>
> You should try one of the ZLR cameras - you can set the shutter speed etc.
> while looking through the EVF, and the camera doesn't need to be held away
> from the body. Having a loud "clunk" noise when you take a picture isn't
> always an advantage!


And with the ZLR you often are able to select different noises or
disable them completely. Some digital P&S cameras, such as Ricoh's
moderately expensive GR Digital can have short enough delays (Half
to Full-press Lag using external viewfinder of ~0.03 sec.) and even
No Press to Full-press Lag can be very short (0.2 sec) if the camera
is used in Snap Mode which uses fixed focus, so there's no AF delay.

 
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Adrian Boliston
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      08-24-2006
"David J Taylor" <(E-Mail Removed)-this-bit.nor-this-part.uk>
wrote in message news:FSbHg.7976$(E-Mail Removed) k...

> Adrian,
>
> You should try one of the ZLR cameras - you can set the shutter speed etc.
> while looking through the EVF, and the camera doesn't need to be held away
> from the body. Having a loud "clunk" noise when you take a picture isn't
> always an advantage!


There was a zlr the salesman showed me when I was buying my D70s (a
panasonic i think) but it didn't have the erganomic "feel" that the Nikon
had, yet it was almost as expensive! Also it has not got the flexability
of swapping lenses. Also an EVF can never match a true optical viewfinder


 
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ASAAR
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      08-24-2006
On Thu, 24 Aug 2006 09:33:42 +0100, Adrian Boliston wrote:

> Also an EVF can never match a true optical viewfinder


True. Some people actually prefer seeing less than 100% of what
will be captured by the sensor as well as the preferring the
parallax error that can make macro shooting so much fun!

 
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David J Taylor
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      08-24-2006
Adrian Boliston wrote:
[]
> There was a zlr the salesman showed me when I was buying my D70s (a
> panasonic i think) but it didn't have the erganomic "feel" that the
> Nikon had, yet it was almost as expensive! Also it has not got the
> flexability of swapping lenses. Also an EVF can never match a true
> optical viewfinder


You mean you can get the D70S for about GBP 250? - I hadn't realised they
were that strongly discounted! <G>

Something like the compact Panasonic FZ5 (weighing about 300g) would
probably be a nice complementary camera when you don't want to risk the
D70S. No dust when not swapping lenses, as well!

David


 
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VK
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      08-24-2006
To the OP -

You've been getting some good advice but you may find this article of
mine, on picking your first SLR, to be useful:
http://www.photosafariindia.com/articles/beg1-slr.html

It most likely wont help you figure out which camera you need, but it
will help you ask the right questions to determine the best camera for
YOU (as opposed to me, or anyone else).

Cheers,
Vandit

PS: There is also a newly-revised companion piece of lenses that you
may find helpful.

 
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Neil Harrington
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      08-24-2006

"David J Taylor" <(E-Mail Removed)-this-bit.nor-this-part.uk>
wrote
>
> You should try one of the ZLR cameras - you can set the shutter speed etc.
> while looking through the EVF, and the camera doesn't need to be held away
> from the body. Having a loud "clunk" noise when you take a picture isn't
> always an advantage!


As I recall, "ZLR" was the term coined by Olympus several years ago to mean
its non-interchangeable zoom-lens 35mm SLRs. But you're using it to mean the
more advanced "SLR-like" digital cameras, right?

If this is a new usage, I do like it a lot better than "P&S" for such
cameras -- which is terribly inappropriate.

Neil


 
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David J Taylor
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      08-24-2006
Neil Harrington wrote:
[]
> As I recall, "ZLR" was the term coined by Olympus several years ago
> to mean its non-interchangeable zoom-lens 35mm SLRs. But you're using
> it to mean the more advanced "SLR-like" digital cameras, right?
>
> If this is a new usage, I do like it a lot better than "P&S" for such
> cameras -- which is terribly inappropriate.
>
> Neil


Yes, Neil. There was a discussion some time ago, when the split of
rec.photo.digital was being considered, as to what to call 'more advanced
"SLR-like" digital cameras', and ZLR won the day. Things have blurred
even more since then, with many of the entry-level DSLRs offering P&S
features like scene modes, EVF, built-in flash etc. etc.

David


 
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acl
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      08-24-2006

Adrian Boliston wrote:
>
> The whole "experience" of using a DSLR is totally different frfom a P&S
> camera:
>
> No more fiddling around with complex menus to get it to do what you want -
> controls are at your fingertips. (WB, ISO, metering mode etc)
> Being able to set aperture or shutter speed while looking through the
> viewfinder.
> Not having to hold the thing at arms's length looking at a grainy LCD
> "preview"
> No more fiddling with a useless "zoom button" - you actually get to control
> the zoom via a zoom ring.
> You get a proper "click" when you take the photo, rather than with a P&S
> when you are never really sure when it has actually taken the shot!
>


Well, it depends on the camera. Some of the EVF cameras are very good
ergonomically, eg the minolta dimage a2 (and I suppose the a200) are
really excellent (and no zoom button!). The a2 also has an excellent
EVF. Ergonomically, I imagine they're comparable to others of that
kind.

Their main disadvantage compared to SLRs are lack of interchangeable
lenses, slower autofocus, more noise.

 
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Neil Harrington
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      08-24-2006

"David J Taylor" <(E-Mail Removed)-this-bit.nor-this-part.uk>
wrote in message news:YtgHg.8074$(E-Mail Removed) k...
> Neil Harrington wrote:
> []
>> As I recall, "ZLR" was the term coined by Olympus several years ago
>> to mean its non-interchangeable zoom-lens 35mm SLRs. But you're using
>> it to mean the more advanced "SLR-like" digital cameras, right?
>>
>> If this is a new usage, I do like it a lot better than "P&S" for such
>> cameras -- which is terribly inappropriate.
>>
>> Neil

>
> Yes, Neil. There was a discussion some time ago, when the split of
> rec.photo.digital was being considered, as to what to call 'more advanced
> "SLR-like" digital cameras', and ZLR won the day.


Ah. Fair enough. Technically wrong (the "R" part) but it's sure better than
the other.


> Things have blurred even more since then, with many of the entry-level
> DSLRs offering P&S features like scene modes, EVF, built-in flash etc.
> etc.


How can even an entry-level dSLR have an EVF? What camera, for instance?
(Mostly I only follow Nikons and Minoltas [Sony] and don't know much about
the others.)

As for built-in flash, I don't see that as a "P&S feature." Every 35mm SLR I
bought after the Minolta 8000i has a built-in flash, as do my Maxxum 5D and
Nikon D70s of course. These are certainly not P&S cameras.

As for scene modes, sure they're on P&S models, but Minolta SLR 35s have
used them for several years too, so I wouldn't necessarily call that a "P&S
feature."

The whole idea behind the "point and shoot" term originally was that that
was just about all you could do with such a camera. No controls, no
settings, no adjustments except for a few on-off things having to do with
flash and self-timer. This seems to have been lost in the current popular
misusage of "P&S."

Neil


 
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