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Saving family photos

 
 
Neil Ellwood
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      08-29-2006
On Mon, 28 Aug 2006 09:11:54 -0700, Mr.Bolshoyhuy wrote:

>
>>
>> In 10 years, will you be able to buy a device to read DVD's, CD's or
>> current hard disk file systems.. . a question worth thinking long and
>> hard about.
>>

> considering that proprietary storage media such as Zip, Jaz, Syquest,
> Orb, Shark,
> LS-120, etc. are dead, I'd be worried about relying on whatever is used
> today; However, the 1.44mb floppy is in all PCs, and non-proprietary
> media such as CDRs/DVDs will be around for atleast 20 years.

Neither my sons pc or my one has a floppy disk drive and if i Had one how
would I get even one quality photo on it ?

--
Neil
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Jeff
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      08-29-2006
John Turco wrote:

>
> You and the previous poster ("Jeff") are deluding yourselves, if you
> think hard disks are infallible. Any HDD can die, at any moment; spend
> some time, in <news:comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage>, and you'll see
> what I mean.
>


Hi John,
I didn't say hard disks are infallible I know they're not.
That's why I have 3, one internal and 2 external.
Chances of all 3 failing at once are 'slim'

I just find it easier having all my data backed up to 2 devices rather
than a load of CDs or DVDs.

Best Wishes,

Jeff (UK)
 
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Neil Maxwell
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      08-30-2006
On Fri, 25 Aug 2006 19:52:26 GMT, "jeremy" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
>
>"Neil Maxwell" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
>news:(E-Mail Removed).. .
>> On Fri, 25 Aug 2006 12:34:04 GMT, "jeremy" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
>>
>> Counting on CDRs to remain readable for 5 years is asking for complete
>> loss of all your data. Many CDRs don't even last 2 years, and DVDRs
>> are the same. They aren't archival media under any circumstances, and
>> that includes those sold as archival.
>>
>> I keep all my archives on a hard disk, which is backed up to 2 other
>> hard disks - one local, one on the network - with all the other data I
>> don't want to lose. Now and again, I dump them to DVD, and this gives
>> me a fresh offline copy.

>
>Hard disks absolutely WILL fail eventually, so they have their shortcomings
>for long-term storage.
>
>You may be willing to store your stuff on multiple HDs, but will your
>descendents? Probably not.
>
>An optical medium--one that does not require much maintenance--is the way to
>go. Right now, the best that consumers have is CD, and they too have their
>problems.


The problem is that there's no good consumer option for long-term
storage (more than 5 years) of digital data.

It's all about risk assessment and risk management, and everyone needs
to make their own decisions regarding the value of their data, how
much risk they're willing to accept, and what they're willing to do to
protect it.

Personally, I'm not good at manual scheduled backups, so a multi-tier
automated HD system is far and away best for me, and has saved me
countless hours. People who are good at manual backups can choose
differently.

Yes, all storage media fails, however, a typical HD lasts longer than
a typical burned CDR, IME, and I've been archiving data on a variety
of media for 20 years. Much more data is lost on a HD failure, and
they cost more, but again, those are all risk management decisions.

I have a large collection of unreadable optical media. In my case, I
have much more digital data than just photos that I want to keep, so a
networked HD backup system works very well, and my data has survived
several HD failures. The stuff that was on CDR from before I realized
how bad it was is all gone.

It's a trade-off, as always. Sure, a CDR or DVDR doesn't require
maintenance when burned, but if you try to read it and don't get
anything, you're out of luck. The 'net is full of sob stories about
people trying to read their burned media and failing, and about people
who lose their HDs with no backups as well.

As I said, counting on optical media to last 5 years is asking for
loss of your data. There's plenty of data to support this.

As for my descendants, well, that's up to them. There will be whole
new storage systems in 10-20 years, and today's longevity data will be
moot. For now, a combination of HD backup and optical media is
without a doubt the best from a risk management perspective.


--
Neil Maxwell - I don't speak for my employer
 
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Frank ess
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      08-30-2006
Neil Maxwell wrote:


<snip>

>
> It's a trade-off, as always. Sure, a CDR or DVDR doesn't require
> maintenance when burned, but if you try to read it and don't get
> anything, you're out of luck. The 'net is full of sob stories about
> people trying to read their burned media and failing, and about
> people
> who lose their HDs with no backups as well.
>
> As I said, counting on optical media to last 5 years is asking for
> loss of your data. There's plenty of data to support this.
>
> As for my descendants, well, that's up to them. There will be whole
> new storage systems in 10-20 years, and today's longevity data will
> be
> moot. For now, a combination of HD backup and optical media is
> without a doubt the best from a risk management perspective.


I've taken to external HD backups, and when (one matched pair, so far)
full, I disconnect and store them, one off-site. Seems to me a quick
USB connection is likely to be available for most home computers for a
long time.

In my nearly thirty years of using hard drives, dozens upon dozens,
there's been one drive failure, and I was ble to recover 95% of the
useful data. I have a case of Zip disks that may or may not be any
good, but the important stuff from them went on a HD a couple-three
years ago. Same for almost all of my CD-ROM and DVD-ROM stuff. If I
weren't so lazy--I mean busy--it would all be cozy on HD.

--
Frank ess

 
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John Turco
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      08-31-2006
Jeff wrote:
>
> John Turco wrote:
>
> >
> > You and the previous poster ("Jeff") are deluding yourselves, if you
> > think hard disks are infallible. Any HDD can die, at any moment; spend
> > some time, in <news:comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage>, and you'll see
> > what I mean.
> >

>
> Hi John,
> I didn't say hard disks are infallible I know they're not.
> That's why I have 3, one internal and 2 external.
> Chances of all 3 failing at once are 'slim'
>
> I just find it easier having all my data backed up to 2 devices rather
> than a load of CDs or DVDs.
>
> Best Wishes,
>
> Jeff (UK)



Hello, Jeff:

You're correct; sorry, for any misunderstanding.


Cordially,
John Turco <jtur@@concentric.net>
 
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