Velocity Reviews - Computer Hardware Reviews

Velocity Reviews > Newsgroups > Computing > Digital Photography > When To Use Black And White

Reply
Thread Tools

When To Use Black And White

 
 
Joe
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      08-11-2006
Some photos look better in black and white than they do in colour, however I
am yet to understand why.

Does anyone know of a way of judging which photos would look better in black
and white, without converting the photo and seeing the results?

Strange request, I know.


 
Reply With Quote
 
 
 
 
Paul Heslop
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      08-11-2006
Joe wrote:
>
> Some photos look better in black and white than they do in colour, however I
> am yet to understand why.
>
> Does anyone know of a way of judging which photos would look better in black
> and white, without converting the photo and seeing the results?
>
> Strange request, I know.


I don't know how... converting on a pc takes seconds if you just want
to compare the two. As we're talking of digital photography there's no
scanning to do, just click and hmmmm. Of course to do it correctly can
take time but a quick comparison is almost instant.
--
Paul (Neurotic to the bone No doubt about it)
------------------------------------------------------
Stop and Look
http://www.geocities.com/dreamst8me/
 
Reply With Quote
 
 
 
 
Hebee Jeebes
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      08-11-2006
For me the best black and white images are high contrast (more black and
white and less grays). I find low contrast images in black and white to be
boring and unattractive. However, some of these low contrast images can be
made high contrast using levels and curves.

R


"Joe" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
news:(E-Mail Removed)...
> Some photos look better in black and white than they do in colour, however
> I am yet to understand why.
>
> Does anyone know of a way of judging which photos would look better in
> black and white, without converting the photo and seeing the results?
>
> Strange request, I know.
>



 
Reply With Quote
 
Justus Lipsius
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      08-11-2006
Joe bedacht in news:(E-Mail Removed):

> Some photos look better in black and white than they do in colour,
> however I am yet to understand why.
>
> Does anyone know of a way of judging which photos would look better in
> black and white, without converting the photo and seeing the results?
>
> Strange request, I know.
>
>


Squint. It sounds crazy, I know. But reducing the amount of light that
reaches your eyes really helps you to 'look' in black and white. It
probably has something to do with the way the retina is layered (the 'rods
and cones').

JL
 
Reply With Quote
 
Shawn Hirn
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      08-11-2006
In article <(E-Mail Removed)>, "Joe" <(E-Mail Removed)>
wrote:

> Some photos look better in black and white than they do in colour, however I
> am yet to understand why.
>
> Does anyone know of a way of judging which photos would look better in black
> and white, without converting the photo and seeing the results?
>
> Strange request, I know.


There's no formula. Whatever looks best to you is what you should do.
 
Reply With Quote
 
ASAAR
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      08-11-2006
On Fri, 11 Aug 2006 20:09:06 +0100, Joe wrote:

> Some photos look better in black and white than they do in colour, however I
> am yet to understand why.
>
> Does anyone know of a way of judging which photos would look better in black
> and white, without converting the photo and seeing the results?


I'd think that you'd need to have the ability to visualize. It's
a talent used (and needed) by film directors, music composers, etc.
A director that had to create a color version and a B&W version and
then choose the better one wouldn't get far. Blindly following a
formula wouldn't work much better. They have to have an initial
concept, and visualize in their mind's eye the best way to implement
it. Same thing with composers. Great ones visualize (hear) the
sound of their work before writing the first note. Bad ones might
take a score and try to improve it by applying a mechanical or
mathematical formula. That's frequently been done with "electronic"
music, and it rarely succeeds. Reading a book on photographic
composition would probably help a bit, as would practice. This
would help you to "understand why" some photos look better in black
and white than in color. But for it to help a *lot*, enough to
allow you to produce great B&W photos, we get back to needing the
more important ability to visualize what the images will look like
before they're made. Some can, many can't.

 
Reply With Quote
 
John
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      08-11-2006
"Joe" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
news:(E-Mail Removed)...
> Some photos look better in black and white than they do in colour, however
> I am yet to understand why.
>
> Does anyone know of a way of judging which photos would look better in
> black and white, without converting the photo and seeing the results?


There are gimmicks. Surf for the "PEAK Mono-Tone Viewer", or "ZONE VI
VIEWING FILTER".

However, after you've shot (or converted) to B&W you find it easier to
previsualize in your head - except for certain adjacent colors that are
impossible for humans to see properly.

With Digital and a program that can modify individual R,G,B layers, you can
put curves against separate channels for interesting control.


 
Reply With Quote
 
nizo1@verizon.net
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      08-12-2006

Joe wrote:
> Some photos look better in black and white than they do in colour, however I
> am yet to understand why.
>
> Does anyone know of a way of judging which photos would look better in black
> and white, without converting the photo and seeing the results?
>
> Strange request, I know.


My own personal feeling is that color images should be "about color".
This is determined before releasing the shutter. Careful selection and
analysis of subject matter play a part in your decision. Sometimes
color gets in the way making B&W the obvious choice. Sometimes the
subject matter makes the choice for you - colorful kites against a deep
blue sky, etc.
Personally, I think it's a good habit, and good discipline, to see your
shot - color or B&W - before you actually shoot it. It's amazing,
sometimes, when we look through our old color images to discover they
would have been just as effective, or moreso, in b&w.

 
Reply With Quote
 
Pete
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      08-12-2006
On Fri, 11 Aug 2006 20:09:06 +0100, Joe wrote:

> Some photos look better in black and white than they do in colour, however I
> am yet to understand why.
>
> Does anyone know of a way of judging which photos would look better in black
> and white, without converting the photo and seeing the results?
>
> Strange request, I know.


My rule of thumb is this:

If color is a significant part of the message you're trying to convey, then
use color.

If not -- especially if the image is highly monochromatic and/or the
message is built on strong patterns, textures, shapes or lines -- the
subject is a good candidate for B/W.

Pete
 
Reply With Quote
 
Stacey
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      08-12-2006
Justus Lipsius wrote:

> Joe bedacht in news:(E-Mail Removed):
>
>> Some photos look better in black and white than they do in colour,
>> however I am yet to understand why.
>>
>> Does anyone know of a way of judging which photos would look better in
>> black and white, without converting the photo and seeing the results?
>>
>> Strange request, I know.
>>
>>

>
> Squint. It sounds crazy, I know. But reducing the amount of light that
> reaches your eyes really helps you to 'look' in black and white.



Also looking through a dark red filter helps..
--

Stacey
 
Reply With Quote
 
 
 
Reply

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Dvd plays in black and white John Computer Support 4 05-21-2005 04:34 AM
black and white cctv camera to television ? Edward Computer Support 5 02-28-2005 01:32 PM
Black and White (and Blue) embee Digital Photography 7 12-13-2004 12:55 PM
My black and white looks blue and gray Mark C Digital Photography 7 11-13-2003 01:53 PM
Black and white w/ G3/G5 Terry Digital Photography 1 07-21-2003 12:05 PM



Advertisments