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Shooting in Raw format

 
 
John Mather
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      08-08-2006
Being just new to digital photography, I have a question regarding "Raw"
format. When shooting in this format, is there anything I must do before
printing? With Jpeg, I just take the photos and then print.

Thanks
John M


 
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Adrian Boliston
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      08-08-2006
"John Mather" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
news:yK6Cg.37587$(E-Mail Removed)...

> Being just new to digital photography, I have a question regarding "Raw"
> format. When shooting in this format, is there anything I must do before
> printing? With Jpeg, I just take the photos and then print.


I use Nikon Capture as my raw converter and it will alow me to print
directly from RAW, without conversion to tiff or jpeg.


 
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marapito@gmail.com
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      08-08-2006
You'll need a Raw Editor to convert the image into something viewable.
Try s7raw - it's freeware and converts images to 16-bit TIFFs, with
editing facilities.

 
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tomm42
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      08-08-2006

John Mather wrote:
> Being just new to digital photography, I have a question regarding "Raw"
> format. When shooting in this format, is there anything I must do before
> printing? With Jpeg, I just take the photos and then print.
>
> Thanks
> John M


When you use RAW format the file you get is the raw data, no
descriptors or placements etc. You need to use a RAW processing program
to open the files. Each camera manufacturer has a raw processing
program and there are more universal raw processors from software
companies like Adobe. Often it is said that the manufacturer's programs
are the best, but remember these folks make cameras not software.
Adobe ACR is a good processor, works with Photoshop and PS Elements,
Phase One has C1 a very well thought of processor, Pixmantec has Raw
Shooter Essentials which may still be available free (Pixmantec just
sold out to Adobe), Bibble and Silky Pics also have a following.
Think about developing film, it is a good analogy, RAW processing can
save not so well exposed pictures add/subtract contrast, sharpen etc. A
very valuable tool.
If your camera takes excessive time to write RAW files to the memory
card you also loose some spontaneity in picture taking. As always it is
a trade off, with my DSLR I use RAW with my point and shoot jpeg.

Tom

 
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Jim
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      08-08-2006

"John Mather" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
news:yK6Cg.37587$(E-Mail Removed)...
> Being just new to digital photography, I have a question regarding "Raw"
> format. When shooting in this format, is there anything I must do before
> printing? With Jpeg, I just take the photos and then print.
>
> Thanks
> John M
>

You need a photo editing program to read the RAW file into memory. This
action converts the RAW data into an array of pixel data. You print this
array. There is no need to save the memory array in any format, unless you
have made changes to the pixel data that you would like to keep.
Jim


 
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stauffer@usfamily.net
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      08-09-2006

John Mather wrote:
> Being just new to digital photography, I have a question regarding "Raw"
> format. When shooting in this format, is there anything I must do before
> printing? With Jpeg, I just take the photos and then print.
>
> Thanks
> John M


One question then is why you would use RAW. A print on paper has less
tonal range even than the jpeg format and MUCH less than RAW.

In print processing of negatives, one always had to decide where in the
available tonal range in the neg one wanted to print, or to compress
the tonal range for the print. With digital, RAW allows expanded
ability to do this compared to jpeg, which already compresses the tonal
range some. If you are not going to "do" anything with the image
before printing, there is no reason to use RAW. If you DO print
straight from an opened RAW image you are likely to lose tones at one
end of the scale or the other.

 
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ColinD
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      08-09-2006
John Mather wrote:
> Being just new to digital photography, I have a question regarding "Raw"
> format. When shooting in this format, is there anything I must do before
> printing? With Jpeg, I just take the photos and then print.
>
> Thanks
> John M
>
>

A major reason to shoot RAW is the shortened dynamic range available
with the camera doing the jpeg thing. Highlights once blown in a Jpeg
cannot be recovered, but highlight retention with RAW is at least 1 to
2 stops better. Color balance, tonality etc can be manipulated with RAW
to a much greater degree than can be done with a Jpeg.

But, if all you want are 6x4 prints, then RAW is overkill. OTOH,
shooting RAW lets you in for a lot more time at your computer if you
want to manipulate your images, though there are programs like DxO
Optics that do most of it automatically. For special shots you still
have to tweak manually specially if you are into exhibition photography.

Colin D.

--
Posted via a free Usenet account from http://www.teranews.com

 
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Hebee Jeebes
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      08-10-2006
One thing about RAW you have the extra flexibility, but you had better like
spending time processing each and every image. Even for something like a 5
shot panorama you have to process each of those 5 shots, save them out of
the RAW format and then stitch them. With JPG or TIF you stitch them and
then adjust one single image. I don't like wasting all of the time
processing RAW shots that would have been just fine in JPG or TIF. I do
however use RAW anytime I am going to take a shot that is going to be tricky
on color and/or exposure. I have gotten pretty good in telling when I will
need the extra that RAW offers. Otherwise RAW is a waste of time and memory
card space.

R


"ColinD" <nospam@127.0.0.1> wrote in message
news:44da5c5d$0$13407$(E-Mail Removed).. .
> John Mather wrote:
>> Being just new to digital photography, I have a question regarding "Raw"
>> format. When shooting in this format, is there anything I must do before
>> printing? With Jpeg, I just take the photos and then print.
>>
>> Thanks
>> John M

> A major reason to shoot RAW is the shortened dynamic range available with
> the camera doing the jpeg thing. Highlights once blown in a Jpeg cannot
> be recovered, but highlight retention with RAW is at least 1 to 2 stops
> better. Color balance, tonality etc can be manipulated with RAW to a much
> greater degree than can be done with a Jpeg.
>
> But, if all you want are 6x4 prints, then RAW is overkill. OTOH, shooting
> RAW lets you in for a lot more time at your computer if you want to
> manipulate your images, though there are programs like DxO Optics that do
> most of it automatically. For special shots you still have to tweak
> manually specially if you are into exhibition photography.
>
> Colin D.
>
> --
> Posted via a free Usenet account from http://www.teranews.com
>



 
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Arthur Small
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      08-10-2006
You adjust the first RAW image and apply the adjustments to the remaining
four. No need to adjust each individually.

www.alldigital.fotopic.net


 
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ColinD
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      08-10-2006
Arthur Small wrote:
> You adjust the first RAW image and apply the adjustments to the remaining
> four. No need to adjust each individually.
>
> www.alldigital.fotopic.net
>
>

Yes, if they are of the same or similar subject/s. A different subject
under different lighting may well require individual attention - wedding
shots, for example. Some inside, some outside, some with flash, etc.

Colin D.

--
Posted via a free Usenet account from http://www.teranews.com

 
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