Velocity Reviews - Computer Hardware Reviews

Velocity Reviews > Newsgroups > Computing > Digital Photography > Shadows in indoor flash pics

Reply
Thread Tools

Shadows in indoor flash pics

 
 
John McWilliams
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      07-26-2006
On 7/25/06 4:54 PM, http://www.velocityreviews.com/forums/(E-Mail Removed) wrote:
> Roy G wrote:
>> "G

>
> Did I see a posting last week, thanking the heavens that a certain
> Troll
> seemed to have vanished up his own arsehole??
>
> Talk about tempting fate.
>

Mebbe so. But what you're doing is stalking.

--
lsmft
 
Reply With Quote
 
 
 
 
Daryl Bryant
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      07-26-2006

"John McWilliams" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
news:(E-Mail Removed). ..
> On 7/25/06 4:54 PM, (E-Mail Removed) wrote:
> > Roy G wrote:
> >> "G

> >
> > Did I see a posting last week, thanking the heavens that a certain
> > Troll
> > seemed to have vanished up his own arsehole??
> >
> > Talk about tempting fate.
> >

> Mebbe so. But what you're doing is stalking.


LOL - (E-Mail Removed) is the Troll i.e. in the Kill File you go!


 
Reply With Quote
 
 
 
 
Roy G
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      07-26-2006
"Daryl Bryant" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
news:(E-Mail Removed)...
>
> "John McWilliams" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
> news:(E-Mail Removed). ..
>> On 7/25/06 4:54 PM, (E-Mail Removed) wrote:
>> > Roy G wrote:
>> >> "G
>> >
>> > Did I see a posting last week, thanking the heavens that a certain
>> > Troll
>> > seemed to have vanished up his own arsehole??
>> >
>> > Talk about tempting fate.
>> >

>> Mebbe so. But what you're doing is stalking.

>
> LOL - (E-Mail Removed) is the Troll i.e. in the Kill File you go!
>



Isn't that sweet.

I seem to have got myself a new little pet, which is following me everywhere
I go.

Roy G


 
Reply With Quote
 
silent lamb
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      07-26-2006
"George" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in
news:(E-Mail Removed) oups.com:

> I have yet to figure a way to eliminate or at least reduce the
> shadow caused by using a flash indoors. I once tried to hook up a
> second flash and that was worse, two shadows behind the person.
> What is the secret guys? Keep walls and things so far behind that
> there is noting for the shadow to form on?
>
> Maybe you could direct me to a source to do a little reading up.
>
> Bill in New Mexico
>

----------

A quick and dirty fix to the problem is to use a small white card as
wide as the flash and about 2x higher, held on by elastic bands. Point
the flash head vertical and take the shot.

This is known as a "specular highlight" reflector.

Another method is to difuse the flash with tracing paper or tissue
paper. In an emergency, I have used a white sweets (candy) bag or even
my white hankerchief.

If you use a P&S camera, you can tape the difusser over the flash. You
can find $2 flash difussers on EBay too. The trade off is power
consumption. Most of these solutions will require double the flash
power to work.
 
Reply With Quote
 
Bill Funk
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      07-26-2006
On Tue, 25 Jul 2006 19:06:00 GMT, "Gene Palmiter"
<(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:

>Lets address why you get the shadow. You will with most on camera flash unit
>or built-in flashes not get a shadow if you shoot landscape and will get one
>if you shoot portrait. Actually you get one both ways but with landscape the
>flash is above the lens and the shadow falls behind the subject. Holding the
>camera sideways the flash is to the side of the lens and falls to the
>opposite side of the subject.


In Superzooms and DSLRs with the flash directly above the lens, you'll
get the shadow as you describe when shooting landscape.
But, with the majority of P&S cameras, the flash is above and off to
one side of the lens, so shadows will appear in both landscape and
portrait mode.
>
>Sort of explains the solutions all by itself now doesn't it? If using the
>built-in shoot landscape or get your subject away from the wall. If you have
>a slave then use it to light the background. If you have a cable you can use
>it to get the flash above the lens. You can condition the light with
>diffusers to soften the shadows or you can bounce it off something if there
>is something white around.

--
Bill Funk
replace "g" with "a"
 
Reply With Quote
 
J. Clarke
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      07-27-2006
George wrote:

> I have yet to figure a way to eliminate or at least reduce the shadow
> caused by using a flash indoors. I once tried to hook up a second flash
> and that was worse, two shadows behind the person. What is the secret
> guys? Keep walls and things so far behind that there is noting for the
> shadow to form on?
>
> Maybe you could direct me to a source to do a little reading up.


If you go to amazon.com and look for books on photographic lighting you'll
find quite a few.

The trick is to use diffuse or indirect lighting. There are all kinds of
ways to achieve this. One quick one is to just point the flash at the
ceiling or at a corner of the room behind the camera--that has its
disadvantages but give it a try.

> Bill in New Mexico


--
--John
to email, dial "usenet" and validate
(was jclarke at eye bee em dot net)
 
Reply With Quote
 
mark.thomas.7@gmail.com
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      07-28-2006
silent lamb wrote:
> A quick and dirty fix to the problem is to use a small white card as
> wide as the flash and about 2x higher, held on by elastic bands. Point
> the flash head vertical and take the shot.
>
> This is known as a "specular highlight" reflector.

A "specular highlight reflector", eh, Dougie? Anyone else heard that
name for a bounce card..? I would have thought ANTI-specular highlight
refelctor would be more appropriate.. sigh..

A card of that size will help a little, but it needs to be larger to
make a more useful difference, preferably *much* larger. (I've seen
some of Douglases 'difussed' (grin) shots, and they aren't much
different from the non-'difussed'.. Show us that one of the wedding
couple again - you know, with the car and its headlights on - willya,
Doug? (O

> If you use a P&S camera, you can tape the difusser (sic) over the flash.


Again, this will give only very slight improvement in shadow diffusion.
If you don't believe me try it and see for yourself. The light source
should be made LARGER to have any appreciable effect - eg hang the
tissue or whatever at least a couple of cm or so in front of the
flash...

I've improvised this type of structure using clear-but-frosted bendable
plastic purchased from a craft store, fashioned into a little structure
that sits about 3" in front of one of my flashes. Its area is about
FOUR times that of the flash head, and it is still a bit short of
ideal... Drafting film (ask your newsagent..) also works well for
diffusion. The hard part is making it big enough to make a useful
difference, and then somehow supporting it out from the flash. You
should of course, always check that your diffuser material doesn't
cause a colour cast. Some semi-transparent materials give very nasty
casts, even though they may look neutral.

 
Reply With Quote
 
ASAAR
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      07-29-2006
On 25 Jul 2006 06:58:10 -0700, George wrote:

> I have yet to figure a way to eliminate or at least reduce the shadow
> caused by using a flash indoors. I once tried to hook up a second flash
> and that was worse, two shadows behind the person. What is the secret
> guys? Keep walls and things so far behind that there is noting for the
> shadow to form on?


That would work, and the further the walls are, the less you'll
have a problem with shadows. But they don't have to be a great
distance away, just not so close that dark shadows are emphasized by
very bright surrounding portions of the walls. Repositioning to
place something between the subject and the walls that doesn't
introduce too much clutter or otherwise reduce the quality of the
picture would help, such as shrubbery, etc.

Another thing that would help is to reduce the relative brightness
of the flash's contribution to the background's brightness. You
could do this either by moving the subject further from the wall, by
moving the camera closer to the subject, or both. Similarly,
brightening the room by using more lights or letting more sunlight
through windows would help, and could even have the effect magnified
if you're using the flash in "fill" mode, if the additional light in
the room causes a reduced output from the flash.

A couple of small slave flashes could help considerably even if
you have a P&S that lacks a PC connector or hot shoe. You'd have to
make sure to get ones that ignore the camera's preflash, and it
would probably if you can reduce the output of the camera's built-in
flash even if it amounts to taping a small piece of white cardboard
in front of the flash.

Lastly, using a high ISO might be a bad idea, as it seems like it
would enhance the flash's contribution to the overall lighting,
making shadows even more obvious. But as you can tell from my
wording I'm not completely sure about this. You might want to take
some pictures in a moderately lighted room with a subject close
enough to a wall to guarantee a noticeable shadow. Then take shots
using your camera's minimum and maximum ISO to see if it makes any
difference. If it does make a difference, use the lowest reasonable
ISO for your shots. Most people would use a low ISO as standard
practice anyway, but this suggestion is just to make sure that if
high ISOs worsen the problem that you avoid using them if possible.

 
Reply With Quote
 
 
 
Reply

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Indoor photo settings; fill-in flash only Porthos Digital Photography 2 12-31-2004 04:00 AM
indoor flash makes colors off- why? Donnie Stowe Digital Photography 6 09-10-2004 04:30 PM
Indoor Flash with high ceiling PeterH Digital Photography 7 06-03-2004 05:21 AM
Minolta Dimage Xt indoor pics grainy CZ Digital Photography 2 05-26-2004 04:06 PM
Poor indoor pics Lynn Digital Photography 13 12-13-2003 10:44 PM



Advertisments