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Linux Photoshop

 
 
Robert Cooze
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      07-07-2006
Allodoxaphobia wrote:
> On Thu, 06 Jul 2006 21:49:04 GMT, Anthony Blunt wrote:
>> Has anybody found a really good photo editor for Linux?

>
> Well, it's cheating, I know...
> Having migrated to linux exclusively a little over two years ago,
> I am happy with Picture Window Pro running in wine.
>
> http://www.dl-c.com/
>
> Seems my intuitor meshes better with PW than with gimp.
>
> Jonesy

Also wine runs photoshop 5.5 no problems, any comments about photoshop
cs2? I have found many memory intensive windows programs will run better
under wine in a Linux improvement than windows on the same machine.
there are some things I do that I use gimp for that I find hard to do
with photoshop and there are some things that I like photoshop for. And
If you own the rite to use the software why not use it.

--
http://cooze.co.nz home of the RecyclerMan aka Robert Cooze

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Anthony
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      07-07-2006
J. Clarke wrote:
> ...
> Yeah, you'll post a falsehood and then refuse to back it up. I'm dying to
> know what those "features" might be.
>
> ...


There are many things I love with Linux that I am totally missing in
WinXP. If you see this features in Vista please remember that Linux had
them a long time ago.

(a) Icons of files in the file manager contain thumbnails of the file
contents themselves. For example, if the file is a jpeg file the icon
will show the actual picture thumbnail size. It works across almost all
file formats I am aware of: PDF, PS, Video files (shows the first
frame), html, txt.

(b) Multiple desktops: WinXP has only one desktop. With KDE under Linux
you can have as many desktops as your memory permits. No more hassles
with too many open windows. Just place those windows in their own
desktops. If you use FVWM you have only one desktop but that desktop is
as large as you wish. Imagine pressing the
alt-key+left-mouse-button-drag combination and then watching in delight
as the entire screen in front of you shifts revealing more desktop
space on the right, on the top, the bottom, and the left side of the
screen!

(c) Installation of software without having the need for the root
(administrator) password. Each Linux user can install whatever software
he wants. Naturally, those software are accessible only to the user who
installed them. This has the advantage that David does not have to
suffer from the spyware-ridden software that Danny installed.

(d) Configuration files that make sense. Each application has two
configuration files: One system level configuration file which is true
for all users of a Linux system and a user-level configuration file for
those user tweaks. Under KDE, you can tweak almost anything! The icons,
the launchers, the keyboard behavior, etc, and those tweaks are for the
user who made them only! Which means after David has logged out and
Rita logs in, Rita gets the configuration she wants because Linux reads
her configuration files after reading the system files instead of
David's.

(e) To run a trojan sent via email you need to do the following (1)
download trojan to selected directory (2) change to that directory (3)
chmod 755 trojan.executable (4) inform KDE that trojan.executable
should be executed when clicked (4) click on trojan. Obviously, since
the procedure is so difficult for the uninitiated, there is very little
chance that Mr Uninitiated will execute trojan.
Result: far less chance of Mr Joe Sixpack running trojans, adware and
spyware.

(f) So many desktop environments to choose from:KDE, GNOME, FVWM,
FluxBox, Enlightenment, etc., etc.! Mr. Joe Sixpack's WinXP has only
one desktop environment which has the advantage of saving Mr Joe
Sixpack from the mental anguish of making the selection himself. With
Linux, we get to choose whatever fits our workflow and our
temperaments. Kinda like being able to choose combinations of lenses
and bodies in the (D)SLR world! Of course, Mr Joe Sixpack does not
understand why Linuxers put great value on choice. He also cannot
understand why serious photographers need so many lenses.

(g) So many software on a basic install! With WinXP, most software you
need are separate installs. Takes time to install them you know.

There are many more delights that you will discover if you just care to
try Linux out. Considering that you have mastered the intricacies of
digital photography you won't have much difficulty mastering Linux
enough to use it too.

 
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Floyd L. Davidson
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Posts: n/a
 
      07-07-2006
"rhys sage" <abuse@127.0.0.1> wrote:
>The Gimp interface is one thing that puts me off too. That and the fact
>it won't handle 12-bit graphics.


What are "12-bit graphics" that it won't handle?

>PitR wrote:
>
>>
>> BTW.. You can download gimpshop.. I don't know if you'll be able to
>> edit 12bit raw images, but its interface resembles photoshop.. Not
>> that it'll make much of a difference, but I hate the gimp interface..


--
Floyd L. Davidson <http://www.apaflo.com/floyd_davidson>
Ukpeagvik (Barrow, Alaska) http://www.velocityreviews.com/forums/(E-Mail Removed)
 
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Floyd L. Davidson
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Posts: n/a
 
      07-07-2006
"Anthony" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
>J. Clarke wrote:
>> ...
>> Yeah, you'll post a falsehood and then refuse to back it up. I'm dying to
>> know what those "features" might be.
>>
>> ...

>
>There are many things I love with Linux that I am totally missing in
>WinXP. If you see this features in Vista please remember that Linux had
>them a long time ago.
>
>(a) Icons of files in the file manager contain thumbnails of the file
>contents themselves. For example, if the file is a jpeg file the icon
>will show the actual picture thumbnail size. It works across almost all
>file formats I am aware of: PDF, PS, Video files (shows the first
>frame), html, txt.


In all honesty, that is not a feature of the OS, whether it be
Windows or Linux. It is strictly an application feature and
could be implemented with either OS.

Of course with a Windows system it is so tightly bound to the
OS that changing it is not feasible. With Linux the fact that
you like it allows *you* to decide to use it, while I don't.

>(b) Multiple desktops: WinXP has only one desktop.


Good point.

>With KDE under Linux
>you can have as many desktops as your memory permits. No more hassles
>with too many open windows. Just place those windows in their own
>desktops. If you use FVWM you have only one desktop but that desktop is
>as large as you wish.


FVWM has had multiple desktops since probably day one. My
workstation has 15 desktops, which the manager is configured to
align in a 1x15 vertical matrix. On my laptop (with a single
monitor) I place the desktop manager window on the left side of
the screen, which allows using the mouse to move from one
desktop to another if only a small sliver of the manager window
is visible. On my workstation, with dual monitors, I have the
desktop manager window on the left edge of the right hand screen
(basically used for static information windows, while the left
screen is "workspace").

I can't imagine using a window manager that does not provide
that functionality. It would be *far* too confining without it.

I note though, that the single user history for MS systems still
has a grip on users. Running applications "full screen" is one
example, as is executing each app from a specific directory
location. Because those habits are encouraged it is difficult
perhaps for such users to see the productivity increase
available with the typical Unix/X approach.

>Imagine pressing the
>alt-key+left-mouse-button-drag combination and then watching in delight
>as the entire screen in front of you shifts revealing more desktop
>space on the right, on the top, the bottom, and the left side of the
>screen!


How about simply using Control, plus the arrow keys. That is
how FVWM moves around the desktop matrix. Obviously with my
1x15 vertically stacked matrix the only keys I use are
ctrl+up_arrow and ctrl+down_arrow. (The default matrix is 3x3
if I remember right.)

Most of your other points, while quite valid, can simply be
summarized as having a true multi-user OS, implemented and used
to take advantage of that characteristic.

--
Floyd L. Davidson <http://www.apaflo.com/floyd_davidson>
Ukpeagvik (Barrow, Alaska) (E-Mail Removed)
 
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Michael Meissner
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Posts: n/a
 
      07-08-2006
"Anthony Blunt" <(E-Mail Removed)> writes:

> Has anybody found a really good photo editor for Linux?
>
>
> Thus far there's The Gimp which works solely in 8-bit format - not
> useful for 12 bit RAW images.


Have you looked at UFRAW, which is a plugin for gimp? It handles the 12-bit
RAW images and you do various corrections in 16-bit mode, and then at the end
you export it to the 8-bit GIMP. Look at:
http://ufraw.sourceforge.net

> Bibble's not too great nor is G-Photo nor many other packages.


I've heard a lot of people who like bibble. So far, I've tried it once, and
went back to gimp, but I'm open to trying it again.

--
Michael Meissner
email: (E-Mail Removed)
http://www.the-meissners.org
 
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J. Clarke
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Posts: n/a
 
      07-08-2006
Floyd L. Davidson wrote:

> "Anthony" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
>>J. Clarke wrote:
>>> ...
>>> Yeah, you'll post a falsehood and then refuse to back it up. I'm dying
>>> to know what those "features" might be.
>>>
>>> ...

>>
>>There are many things I love with Linux that I am totally missing in
>>WinXP. If you see this features in Vista please remember that Linux had
>>them a long time ago.
>>
>>(a) Icons of files in the file manager contain thumbnails of the file
>>contents themselves. For example, if the file is a jpeg file the icon
>>will show the actual picture thumbnail size. It works across almost all
>>file formats I am aware of: PDF, PS, Video files (shows the first
>>frame), html, txt.

>
> In all honesty, that is not a feature of the OS, whether it be
> Windows or Linux. It is strictly an application feature and
> could be implemented with either OS.
>
> Of course with a Windows system it is so tightly bound to the
> OS that changing it is not feasible. With Linux the fact that
> you like it allows *you* to decide to use it, while I don't.
>
>>(b) Multiple desktops: WinXP has only one desktop.

>
> Good point.
>
>>With KDE under Linux
>>you can have as many desktops as your memory permits. No more hassles
>>with too many open windows. Just place those windows in their own
>>desktops. If you use FVWM you have only one desktop but that desktop is
>>as large as you wish.

>
> FVWM has had multiple desktops since probably day one. My
> workstation has 15 desktops, which the manager is configured to
> align in a 1x15 vertical matrix. On my laptop (with a single
> monitor) I place the desktop manager window on the left side of
> the screen, which allows using the mouse to move from one
> desktop to another if only a small sliver of the manager window
> is visible. On my workstation, with dual monitors, I have the
> desktop manager window on the left edge of the right hand screen
> (basically used for static information windows, while the left
> screen is "workspace").
>
> I can't imagine using a window manager that does not provide
> that functionality. It would be *far* too confining without it.
>
> I note though, that the single user history for MS systems still
> has a grip on users. Running applications "full screen" is one
> example, as is executing each app from a specific directory
> location. Because those habits are encouraged it is difficult
> perhaps for such users to see the productivity increase
> available with the typical Unix/X approach.
>
>>Imagine pressing the
>>alt-key+left-mouse-button-drag combination and then watching in delight
>>as the entire screen in front of you shifts revealing more desktop
>>space on the right, on the top, the bottom, and the left side of the
>>screen!

>
> How about simply using Control, plus the arrow keys. That is
> how FVWM moves around the desktop matrix. Obviously with my
> 1x15 vertically stacked matrix the only keys I use are
> ctrl+up_arrow and ctrl+down_arrow. (The default matrix is 3x3
> if I remember right.)
>
> Most of your other points, while quite valid, can simply be
> summarized as having a true multi-user OS, implemented and used
> to take advantage of that characteristic.


Oh, Christ, another advotwit parading his ignorance. Do Linux a favor,
start supporting Windows.

--
--John
to email, dial "usenet" and validate
(was jclarke at eye bee em dot net)
 
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Paul Allen
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Posts: n/a
 
      07-08-2006
On Fri, 07 Jul 2006 12:04:08 -0800
(E-Mail Removed) (Floyd L. Davidson) wrote:

> "rhys sage" <abuse@127.0.0.1> wrote:
> >The Gimp interface is one thing that puts me off too. That and the
> >fact it won't handle 12-bit graphics.

>
> What are "12-bit graphics" that it won't handle?


The GIMP does all of its internal processing with 8 bits per channel.
There's a fork of the GIMP designed for movie work that was upgraded
to handle (I think) 16 bits per channel, but the fork happened a long
time ago and it hasn't kept up with 2.x changes. My rusty memory wants
to call it "cinepaint", but I could be all wet. Ask Google.

Paul Allen
 
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Anthony
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      07-08-2006
J. Clarke wrote:
>
> Oh, Christ, another advotwit parading his ignorance. Do Linux a favor,
> start supporting Windows.
>
> --
> --John


Mr Clarke, I hope you are not referring to me. Rather ironic you would
be urging me to shift to Windows when I have successfully urged others
to shift to Linux. On second thought, maybe I am an ignorant linux
user.

You see:

(a) I program C/C++/Java/Python using vi.
(b) My preferred desktop environment is Gnome because my laptop and
desktops are capable of using it, but all I need is a bash prompt
actually.
(c) My preferred wordprocessor (actually typesetter) is TeX and LaTeX.
I have my own macros for TeX too. I don't use office suites.
(d) When there is a need for me to do numerical calculations I just
write a small python script or perhaps I'll whip out maxima if I need
to do algebra. I don't dig Perl.
(e) My favorite distro is Slackware with LFS running second. I may soon
migrate to Debian though. It's a pity Slackware is no longer supporting
GNOME.
(f) I prefer to install software using sources.
(g) When there is an itch that needs scratching, I have my programming
skills to turn to.
(h) I actually like the GIMP interface. (I really must be a bottom
feeder, then.)
(i) I still have a windows machine but only because I still need to use
Adobe Photoshop and Adobe Pagemaker. If Adobe ports those two
applications to Linux, I won't have any need for windows anymore.
(j) I am writing these words using Linux and Mozilla.

Lest you get the wrong impression, I think the GIMP is already a
serious competitor to Photoshop for most photographic applications.
Photoshop has more finesse, of course. For the money we are paying for
it, Photoshop must have some tangible advantages over the GIMP or Adobe
will soon be out of business.

Maybe I am an advotwit. But sorry, I can't accept your windows offer.

PS. I know you won't get the gist of my joke. But Linuxers in this
forum will.

 
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Floyd L. Davidson
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Posts: n/a
 
      07-08-2006
Paul Allen <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
>On Fri, 07 Jul 2006 12:04:08 -0800
>(E-Mail Removed) (Floyd L. Davidson) wrote:
>
>> "rhys sage" <abuse@127.0.0.1> wrote:
>> >The Gimp interface is one thing that puts me off too. That and the
>> >fact it won't handle 12-bit graphics.

>>
>> What are "12-bit graphics" that it won't handle?

>
>The GIMP does all of its internal processing with 8 bits per channel.
>There's a fork of the GIMP designed for movie work that was upgraded
>to handle (I think) 16 bits per channel, but the fork happened a long
>time ago and it hasn't kept up with 2.x changes. My rusty memory wants
>to call it "cinepaint", but I could be all wet. Ask Google.


Yes, it is /cinepaint/. It targets editing video images...

However, I would still like to know what "12-bit graphics" The
GIMP will not handle. (That is somewhat of a rhetorical
question, because I do know the answer. But the answer brings
up the point of interest here, which the question does not.)

Please note that The GIMP can handle 16 bit TIFF and PPM
formats. The only 12 bit format I can think of offhand is
Nikon's NEF raw data file, which can of course be "handled" too
(for example with the UFRAW plugin).

I am also well aware that you cannot edit to greater than 8 bits
per channel accuracy with The GIMP. And equally aware that
except for some very special circumstances which few of us are
likely to encounter this week, that simply doesn't make any
difference at all (does your monitor or your printer work
with 12 bits or more?).

So the question is, what problem is it that the OP has with
using The GIMP to edit images from a digital camera? If it
really is a problem, then it should be very interesting to hear
why. If it isn't, the OP might want to know why that is too.

--
Floyd L. Davidson <http://www.apaflo.com/floyd_davidson>
Ukpeagvik (Barrow, Alaska) (E-Mail Removed)
 
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Floyd L. Davidson
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      07-08-2006
"J. Clarke" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
>Floyd L. Davidson wrote:
>> "Anthony" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
>>>J. Clarke wrote:
>>>> ...
>>>> Yeah, you'll post a falsehood and then refuse to back it up. I'm dying
>>>> to know what those "features" might be.


I notice are the one who has posted a falsehood and now can't
back it up; and instead all you can come up with a whimpy
attempt at gratuitous insults.

>>>> ...
>>>
>>>There are many things I love with Linux that I am totally missing in
>>>WinXP. If you see this features in Vista please remember that Linux had
>>>them a long time ago.
>>>
>>>(a) Icons of files in the file manager contain thumbnails of the file
>>>contents themselves. For example, if the file is a jpeg file the icon
>>>will show the actual picture thumbnail size. It works across almost all
>>>file formats I am aware of: PDF, PS, Video files (shows the first
>>>frame), html, txt.

>>
>> In all honesty, that is not a feature of the OS, whether it be
>> Windows or Linux. It is strictly an application feature and
>> could be implemented with either OS.
>>
>> Of course with a Windows system it is so tightly bound to the
>> OS that changing it is not feasible. With Linux the fact that
>> you like it allows *you* to decide to use it, while I don't.
>>
>>>(b) Multiple desktops: WinXP has only one desktop.

>>
>> Good point.
>>
>>>With KDE under Linux
>>>you can have as many desktops as your memory permits. No more hassles
>>>with too many open windows. Just place those windows in their own
>>>desktops. If you use FVWM you have only one desktop but that desktop is
>>>as large as you wish.

>>
>> FVWM has had multiple desktops since probably day one. My
>> workstation has 15 desktops, which the manager is configured to
>> align in a 1x15 vertical matrix. On my laptop (with a single
>> monitor) I place the desktop manager window on the left side of
>> the screen, which allows using the mouse to move from one
>> desktop to another if only a small sliver of the manager window
>> is visible. On my workstation, with dual monitors, I have the
>> desktop manager window on the left edge of the right hand screen
>> (basically used for static information windows, while the left
>> screen is "workspace").
>>
>> I can't imagine using a window manager that does not provide
>> that functionality. It would be *far* too confining without it.
>>
>> I note though, that the single user history for MS systems still
>> has a grip on users. Running applications "full screen" is one
>> example, as is executing each app from a specific directory
>> location. Because those habits are encouraged it is difficult
>> perhaps for such users to see the productivity increase
>> available with the typical Unix/X approach.
>>
>>>Imagine pressing the
>>>alt-key+left-mouse-button-drag combination and then watching in delight
>>>as the entire screen in front of you shifts revealing more desktop
>>>space on the right, on the top, the bottom, and the left side of the
>>>screen!

>>
>> How about simply using Control, plus the arrow keys. That is
>> how FVWM moves around the desktop matrix. Obviously with my
>> 1x15 vertically stacked matrix the only keys I use are
>> ctrl+up_arrow and ctrl+down_arrow. (The default matrix is 3x3
>> if I remember right.)
>>
>> Most of your other points, while quite valid, can simply be
>> summarized as having a true multi-user OS, implemented and used
>> to take advantage of that characteristic.

>
>Oh, Christ, another advotwit parading his ignorance. Do Linux a favor,
>start supporting Windows.


If you wish to project your ignorance is OS design, go right ahead.
You don't seem able to argue even a single point that was made.

Start by telling us how many desktops you typically invoke on your
MS-Windows screen. That should be good for a few grins and giggles...

--
Floyd L. Davidson <http://www.apaflo.com/floyd_davidson>
Ukpeagvik (Barrow, Alaska) (E-Mail Removed)
 
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