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Preventing Rip-Off of My Photos on DVDs

 
 
Randy Berbaum
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      06-15-2006
Andrew <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
: "One4All" <(E-Mail Removed)> ruminated:
: >What I'd like to know is whether someone who copies these files, given
: >their format & file size, could use them for their own gain. I know
: >they could be used on a Website, but are they of sufficient size that
: >they could be used for hard-copy purposes (postcards, calendars,
: >magazines, art prints, etc.)?

: To allay your fears, I recommend going to a photography site
: like flickr.com, to see what amazing, excellent photography
: people are willing to share at reasonably high
: resolution. Now, compare those photos to yours. If yours are
: far superior, then you may have something to worry about. If
: yours are at the same level or worse, then you really do not
: have to worry about someone using your images for commercial
: purposes. If they wanted to infringe on someone else's
: copyrights, they could pick from a large number of photos
: already available on the internet, which are far easier to
: obtain and already tagged for easy search.

: While i wouldn't feel great if someone were using my photos
: without permission, it's not all bad, as more people would
: get to see my photography, and it's not taking away money
: that I would have made otherwise.

: Andrew

One further thought. Be sure to keep an original copy with all the exif
data intact. Then if you discover that someone has published your photo
without permission you have proof that the image is originally yours and
the date, time and such can back up your claim. At least if someone else
made a profit from your work without permission you would have proof in an
attempt to recover damages from the perpetrator.

Another reason to keep a copy of all your originals direct from the camera
on some form of archiving device (CD, DVD-R, etc).

Randy

==========
Randy Berbaum
Champaign, IL

 
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hywel.jenkins@gmail.com
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      06-15-2006

Dmac wrote:
> Mxsmanic wrote:
> > One4All writes:
> >
> >
> >>I intend to burn some DVD's of images I've taken over the years to
> >>share with family/friends. These files are in .jpg format at high (not
> >>highest) quality. The files average 1MB each. Many of these images (I
> >>think) are marketable. I want to share my best photos, partly for their
> >>enjoyment & partly for my own ego.


> One way to make it harder for the image thieves - those blokes with
> masks, lurking in the shadows of Usenet and your friend's lounge rooms -
> is to compile a slide show into an Executable file. This way it gets
> seen but the images are all part of the one file which has to be reverse
> engineered to get the images out of it.


That means that the images can only be viewed on a computer, possibly
negating the point of produced a DVD, which may be viewed on a TV with
a suitable DVD player . It might also be tricky to get the same DVD to
work with different operating systems.

It also does very little to prevent copying the images. Once the image
is displayed on a PC screen it can be copied, saved, and reprinted,
albeit at lowish resolution.

--
Hywel

 
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Marvin
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      06-15-2006
One4All wrote:
> I intend to burn some DVD's of images I've taken over the years to
> share with family/friends. These files are in .jpg format at high (not
> highest) quality. The files average 1MB each. Many of these images (I
> think) are marketable. I want to share my best photos, partly for their
> enjoyment & partly for my own ego.
>
> Altho I trust my family/friends, once a DVD goes out, no telling who
> may have access to it and may use the images for their own gain. I've
> registered these images with the Copyright Center, but if the images
> cannot be reproduced well, that would solve the problem up front.
>
> What I'd like to know is whether someone who copies these files, given
> their format & file size, could use them for their own gain. I know
> they could be used on a Website, but are they of sufficient size that
> they could be used for hard-copy purposes (postcards, calendars,
> magazines, art prints, etc.)?
>
> Putting it another way, what would be a sufficient file size to show on
> a TV screen, while preventing that file's use, due to low quality, for
> print purposes?
>
> My system is Macintosh G5, OS 10.3.9 (Panther). If more info needed,
> let me know.
>

Screen resolution is nominally 72 ppi. If you want the image
to be 6" wide on the screen, reduce the pixel count to a
width of 72X6 = 432 pixels. If a friend or family member
wants to make a print, they can ask you for the full-size
image file.
 
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One4All
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      06-15-2006

Stewy wrote:

> Use maximum compression.


Sorry to be so dense, but as I said, this is new territory for me: So,
using maximum .jpg compression will still yield a good image on a TV
set? Even HDTV sets?

 
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Shawn Hirn
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      06-15-2006
In article <(E-Mail Removed) .com>,
"One4All" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:

> I intend to burn some DVD's of images I've taken over the years to
> share with family/friends. These files are in .jpg format at high (not
> highest) quality. The files average 1MB each. Many of these images (I
> think) are marketable. I want to share my best photos, partly for their
> enjoyment & partly for my own ego.
>
> Altho I trust my family/friends, once a DVD goes out, no telling who
> may have access to it and may use the images for their own gain. I've
> registered these images with the Copyright Center, but if the images
> cannot be reproduced well, that would solve the problem up front.
>
> What I'd like to know is whether someone who copies these files, given
> their format & file size, could use them for their own gain. I know
> they could be used on a Website, but are they of sufficient size that
> they could be used for hard-copy purposes (postcards, calendars,
> magazines, art prints, etc.)?
>
> Putting it another way, what would be a sufficient file size to show on
> a TV screen, while preventing that file's use, due to low quality, for
> print purposes?
>
> My system is Macintosh G5, OS 10.3.9 (Panther). If more info needed,
> let me know.


The reality is the only way you can avoid having your photos stolen is
to avoid giving them out. Even if you do as others suggested and degrade
their resolution, an enterprising copyright violator can simply pass
your photos through one of numerous filters to increase the resolution
with minimal degradation.

You can't have it both ways. You need to decide which is more important
to you, preventing theft of your photos or sharing them.
 
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John McWilliams
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      06-15-2006
Shawn Hirn wrote:
> In article <(E-Mail Removed) .com>,
> "One4All" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
>
>> I intend to burn some DVD's of images I've taken over the years to
>> share with family/friends. These files are in .jpg format at high (not
>> highest) quality. The files average 1MB each. Many of these images (I
>> think) are marketable. I want to share my best photos, partly for their
>> enjoyment & partly for my own ego.


> The reality is the only way you can avoid having your photos stolen is
> to avoid giving them out. Even if you do as others suggested and degrade
> their resolution, an enterprising copyright violator can simply pass
> your photos through one of numerous filters to increase the resolution
> with minimal degradation.


The latter is patent rubbish.
>
> You can't have it both ways. You need to decide which is more important
> to you, preventing theft of your photos or sharing them.


Others have offered practical ways you can do both.

--
John McWilliams
 
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Adrian Boliston
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      06-15-2006
"Marvin" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
news:(E-Mail Removed)...

> Screen resolution is nominally 72 ppi. If you want the image to be 6" wide
> on the screen, reduce the pixel count to a width of 72X6 = 432 pixels. If
> a friend or family member wants to make a print, they can ask you for the
> full-size image file.


Notebooks tend to have a higher ppi value as there is less space to cram in
those pixels!

My notebook screen is 9.75 inches horizontally with 1366 pixels wide which
means it's 140 ppi, and the 432 pixel photo would be a microscopic 3" wide.


 
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Floyd L. Davidson
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      06-15-2006
Shawn Hirn <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
>The reality is the only way you can avoid having your photos stolen is
>to avoid giving them out.


That is basically true. But, it is also true that you can't get
into a car accident if you are never in a car, you can't die of
food poisoning if you never eat, and you won't drown if you
never go near water. All true, but it is absolutely not practical
to implement such avoidance schemes as a solution to the problem
cited.

>Even if you do as others suggested and degrade
>their resolution, an enterprising copyright violator can simply pass
>your photos through one of numerous filters to increase the resolution
>with minimal degradation.


Where can I get one of these filters???? I don't need to steal images,
but that certainly sounds useful in other ways!

[Hint: they don't exist.]

>You can't have it both ways. You need to decide which is more important
>to you, preventing theft of your photos or sharing them.


Or, you can share something which is less likely to attract a
thief, but which does satisfy the particular recipients. That
is easier said than done, perhaps, but the point is that by
customizing the product to the customer, exposure is reduced.

--
Floyd L. Davidson <http://www.apaflo.com/floyd_davidson>
Ukpeagvik (Barrow, Alaska) http://www.velocityreviews.com/forums/(E-Mail Removed)
 
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2
Guest
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      06-15-2006
"Shawn Hirn" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote

> The reality is the only way you can avoid having your photos stolen is
> to avoid giving them out.


Right.

> Even if you do as others suggested and degrade
> their resolution, an enterprising copyright violator can simply pass
> your photos through one of numerous filters to increase the resolution
> with minimal degradation.


Wrong.


 
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One4All
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      06-15-2006

As I've said earlier, I trust my family/friends not to rip me off. My
concern is that they loan the DVD to someone else. I think that if, in
my narration at the beginning, I state that I do not want the DVD to
leave their possession, they will honor that. An earlier poster said
that if I'm lucky, my recipients will toss the DVD into a drawer & if
unlucky, they'll trash it. Well, that's ok with me, regardless. I just
don't want them to loan the DVD to another.

I guess it gets down to a matter of trust, provided one informs the
recipient of that trust.

 
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