Velocity Reviews - Computer Hardware Reviews

Velocity Reviews > Newsgroups > Computing > Digital Photography > Please, why is sky washed out?

Reply
Thread Tools

Please, why is sky washed out?

 
 
Mr.Bolshoyhuy
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      06-07-2006

Celcius wrote:
> Hi everyone!
>
> Why is the sky washed out while my wife with a point and shoot gets blue
> skys?
> It seems to me the sky was quite blue when I took this photo:


single use cameras use a fast shutter speed and ISO400 film.
that P&S might also were using a faster shutter speed than you set
your SLR. set to exp.comp. -1 and the sky will be blue.
thats what I did when taking a photo thru a tree stump into the sky.

 
Reply With Quote
 
 
 
 
Scott W
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      06-07-2006

Celcius wrote:
> Hi everyone!
>
> Why is the sky washed out while my wife with a point and shoot gets blue
> skys?
> It seems to me the sky was quite blue when I took this photo:
> http://celestart.com/images/publiques/15.jpg
>
> Any ideas? Recommendations?
>
> Thanks,
>
> Marcel

As others have said the sky is over exposed

learn to always shoot raw, you will be much happier, I would be very
surprised is the raw file of the exact shoot could not pull out a nice
looking blue sky.

In cases of a bright background, and many other hard lighting cases,
you can bracket to good effect.

Since the XT can take a jpeg file at the same time it does a raw you
can easily do some test taking the same type of shot and checking to
see how much better the image from the raw file can be compared to the
jpeg the camera produces.

Scott

 
Reply With Quote
 
 
 
 
Jim
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      06-07-2006
Careful use of a graduated neutral density filter might help getting good
color in the sky. What you need to do is cut down on the exposure of the
sky while leaving everything else alone.
Jim
"Pat" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
news:(E-Mail Removed) ups.com...
> The posts re the overexposed sky are generally correct. You can either
> under expose or play with it in photoshop and fix it. Both are
> perfectly good alternatives. Shooting in RAW might help, but RAW isn't
> the cure-all than many people think.
>
> I am "old school" so take my advice accordingly. If you are taking
> lots of pictures like that and want the sky to look better, keep the
> sky from overexposing in the first place and everything after that is
> much easier. The way to do that is to invest in a polarizing filter.
> That will allow you to darken a sky like that (plus keep interesting
> details in it) without underexposing the rest of the image. It will
> also cut out most glare that you encounter.
>
> For an autofocus lens, you want a "circular polarizer" (don't ask why,
> it's a long story, you just want one).
>
> People in this group hate filters and they hate people who don't shoot
> in RAW, but really, a filter is the answer. That's the way we did it
> back in "the day" when we used that stuff called film.
>
> Good luck with it.
>
> Pat
>
>
>
> Celcius wrote:
>> Hi everyone!
>>
>> Why is the sky washed out while my wife with a point and shoot gets blue
>> skys?
>> It seems to me the sky was quite blue when I took this photo:
>> http://celestart.com/images/publiques/15.jpg
>>
>> Any ideas? Recommendations?
>>
>> Thanks,
>>
>> Marcel

>



 
Reply With Quote
 
GF3
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      06-07-2006
Celcius wrote:

>
> "Daniel Silevitch" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
> news:(E-Mail Removed).. .
>> On Wed, 7 Jun 2006 09:22:04 -0400, Celcius <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
>> > Hi everyone!
>> >
>> > Why is the sky washed out while my wife with a point and shoot gets
>> > blue skys?
>> > It seems to me the sky was quite blue when I took this photo:
>> > http://celestart.com/images/publiques/15.jpg
>> >
>> > Any ideas? Recommendations?

>>
>> The sky is over-exposed; basically, it's so bright that the camera
>> sensor is saturating and just sees it as "white". You needed to tell the
>> camera to take in less light, either by using a faster shutter speed or
>> by stopping down the lens. Depending on the features your camera has,
>> there are a variety of ways of doing that.
>>
>> -dms

>
> Sorry Daniel, I forgot to say. I have a Canon Rebel XT and the lens I used
> was a Canon EF-S 17-85mm 1 4.5-5.6 IS USM
> Regards,
> Marcel
>
>

Canon's have poor exposure latitude. You will have to underexpose every shot
to prevent blowout.

Experiment until you find the best compromise.

--
George Fritschmann III
 
Reply With Quote
 
Celcius
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      06-07-2006

"Ed Ruf" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
news:(E-Mail Removed)...
> On Wed, 7 Jun 2006 09:22:04 -0400, in rec.photo.digital "Celcius"
> <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
>
> >Hi everyone!
> >
> >Why is the sky washed out while my wife with a point and shoot gets blue
> >skys?
> >It seems to me the sky was quite blue when I took this photo:
> >http://celestart.com/images/publiques/15.jpg
> >
> >Any ideas? Recommendations?

>
> First guess would be improper white balance. The exif info in the
> photo says the camera was set to manual WB. So, exactly how did you
> set it? If you're just beginning start with auto WB of set the proper
> preset for the scene at hand, such as sunny for this scene.
> __________________________________________________ ______
> Ed Ruf Lifetime AMA# 344007 ((E-Mail Removed))
> http://EdwardGRuf.com


Ed,
My was st at "sunny"
Marcel


 
Reply With Quote
 
Celcius
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      06-07-2006

"Pat" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
news:(E-Mail Removed) ups.com...
> The posts re the overexposed sky are generally correct. You can either
> under expose or play with it in photoshop and fix it. Both are
> perfectly good alternatives. Shooting in RAW might help, but RAW isn't
> the cure-all than many people think.
>
> I am "old school" so take my advice accordingly. If you are taking
> lots of pictures like that and want the sky to look better, keep the
> sky from overexposing in the first place and everything after that is
> much easier. The way to do that is to invest in a polarizing filter.
> That will allow you to darken a sky like that (plus keep interesting
> details in it) without underexposing the rest of the image. It will
> also cut out most glare that you encounter.
>
> For an autofocus lens, you want a "circular polarizer" (don't ask why,
> it's a long story, you just want one).
>
> People in this group hate filters and they hate people who don't shoot
> in RAW, but really, a filter is the answer. That's the way we did it
> back in "the day" when we used that stuff called film.
>
> Good luck with it.
>
> Pat
>

Thanks Pat.
I tried with my polarizing filter and it turned a tad better. However, the
sky was still ooverexposed ;-(
I can't try again now because it's overcast... we're getting rain soon ...
Marcel


 
Reply With Quote
 
acl
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      06-07-2006
King Sardon wrote:
> On 7 Jun 2006 08:06:03 -0700, "Pat" <(E-Mail Removed)>
> wrote:
> A polarizing filter will help little with a hazy sky, and the picture
> shows a hazy sky.
>
> KS


It shows an overexposed sky. The original poster also says it was blue;
so it's probably just overexposed, not hazy.
 
Reply With Quote
 
Ingo von Borstel
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      06-07-2006
Hi,

> I tried with my polarizing filter and it turned a tad better.
> However, the sky was still ooverexposed ;-( I can't try again now
> because it's overcast... we're getting rain soon ...


I don't think any filter will help another way you couldn't achieve
using only your camera. You just need less light, that is a
smaller aperture or a shorter shutter time.

I suggest next time you give it a try with various exposure settings,
ranging from -2 ... +2 compensation and take images simultaneously as
jpeg and RAW. Then have a look on the computer and judge which is best
so you'll know for the next time which way to go. After all: taking an
image more doesn't cost a single cent. Just be sure to delete the
unworthy pictures.

From my experience there is a lot more to raw data than jpeg, especially
if the light situation is difficult: you can safely alter exposure by
+/-2 levels on the computer. The backdraw is that it requires a lot of
time afterwards.

Best regards,
Ingoo
 
Reply With Quote
 
King Sardon
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      06-07-2006
On 7 Jun 2006 08:06:03 -0700, "Pat" <(E-Mail Removed)>
wrote:

> The way to do that is to invest in a polarizing filter.
>That will allow you to darken a sky like that (plus keep interesting
>details in it) without underexposing the rest of the image. It will
>also cut out most glare that you encounter.


A polarizing filter will help little with a hazy sky, and the picture
shows a hazy sky.

KS
 
Reply With Quote
 
John McWilliams
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      06-07-2006
Scott W wrote:
> Celcius wrote:
>> Hi everyone!
>>
>> Why is the sky washed out while my wife with a point and shoot gets blue
>> skys?
>> It seems to me the sky was quite blue when I took this photo:
>> http://celestart.com/images/publiques/15.jpg
>>
>> Any ideas? Recommendations?
>>
>> Thanks,
>>
>> Marcel

> As others have said the sky is over exposed
>
> learn to always shoot raw, you will be much happier, I would be very
> surprised is the raw file of the exact shoot could not pull out a nice
> looking blue sky.
>
> In cases of a bright background, and many other hard lighting cases,
> you can bracket to good effect.
>
> Since the XT can take a jpeg file at the same time it does a raw you
> can easily do some test taking the same type of shot and checking to
> see how much better the image from the raw file can be compared to the
> jpeg the camera produces.
>


But that's well after the fact. There's but one review on the camera,
and I suggest concentrating on the histogram. Also, the blinking sky in
the review would be a big hint.

Bracketing in RAW gives incredible latitude. Even a single RAW image can
be developed in, say, two different ways, one for the house, and one for
the sky. Then you can layer the two, mask one, and paint on the mask to
reveal the bottom layer.

--
John McWilliams
 
Reply With Quote
 
 
 
Reply

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
A way to transfer data from My Sky to a PC or backup My Sky data? Donchano NZ Computing 5 02-09-2010 04:59 AM
Two sky boxes with single Sky+ dish sherkhanthegreat@gmail.com Computer Support 0 09-07-2009 11:27 PM
findcontrol("PlaceHolderPrice") why why why why why why why why why why why Mr. SweatyFinger ASP .Net 2 12-02-2006 03:46 PM
Copying Movies: SKY says its legal on "MY SKY" Jones Minor NZ Computing 27 11-25-2005 08:40 AM
Blue Sky From White Sky Russell Digital Photography 5 05-30-2005 11:56 PM



Advertisments