Velocity Reviews - Computer Hardware Reviews

Velocity Reviews > Newsgroups > Computing > Digital Photography > How to repair photos with bad lighting?

Reply
Thread Tools

How to repair photos with bad lighting?

 
 
ingsiang@gmail.com
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      04-24-2006
I am incharge of the editing and compiling of the photos of my class
trip yesterday.

We went to the beach for the photo-taking session this time.

However, many of the photos were taken against the sun, meaning that
the camera itself is facing towards the sun, hence causing the subjects
of the photos appeared dark.

Anyone here could help and tell me ways(anything, photoshop or whatever
softwares or services can be consider) to enhance the photos so I can
improve the lighting?

I tried to adjust the overall lighting but it seems to push the
background colour a bit too far, making the photos look real odd and
somewhat distorted.

Please, advice needed urgently. Thanks a million.

 
Reply With Quote
 
 
 
 
Dan
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      04-24-2006
A badly shoot pic is a badly shoot pic but sometimes Dodge and Burn
tools in Photoshop can rescue some pictures.

http://www.velocityreviews.com/forums/(E-Mail Removed) wrote:
> I am incharge of the editing and compiling of the photos of my class
> trip yesterday.
>
> We went to the beach for the photo-taking session this time.
>
> However, many of the photos were taken against the sun, meaning that
> the camera itself is facing towards the sun, hence causing the subjects
> of the photos appeared dark.
>
> Anyone here could help and tell me ways(anything, photoshop or whatever
> softwares or services can be consider) to enhance the photos so I can
> improve the lighting?
>
> I tried to adjust the overall lighting but it seems to push the
> background colour a bit too far, making the photos look real odd and
> somewhat distorted.
>
> Please, advice needed urgently. Thanks a million.
>

 
Reply With Quote
 
 
 
 
Gizmo
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      04-24-2006

<(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
news:(E-Mail Removed) ups.com...
>I am incharge of the editing and compiling of the photos of my class
> trip yesterday.
>
> We went to the beach for the photo-taking session this time.
>
> However, many of the photos were taken against the sun, meaning that
> the camera itself is facing towards the sun, hence causing the subjects
> of the photos appeared dark.
>
> Anyone here could help and tell me ways(anything, photoshop or whatever
> softwares or services can be consider) to enhance the photos so I can
> improve the lighting?
>
> I tried to adjust the overall lighting but it seems to push the
> background colour a bit too far, making the photos look real odd and
> somewhat distorted.
>
> Please, advice needed urgently. Thanks a million.



In Photoshop;
Image > Adjustments > Shaddow / highlight


 
Reply With Quote
 
bob crownfield
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      04-24-2006
(E-Mail Removed) wrote:
> I am incharge of the editing and compiling of the photos of my class
> trip yesterday.
>
> We went to the beach for the photo-taking session this time.
>
> However, many of the photos were taken against the sun, meaning that
> the camera itself is facing towards the sun, hence causing the subjects
> of the photos appeared dark.
>
> Anyone here could help and tell me ways(anything, photoshop or whatever
> softwares or services can be consider) to enhance the photos so I can
> improve the lighting?
>
> I tried to adjust the overall lighting but it seems to push the
> background colour a bit too far, making the photos look real odd and
> somewhat distorted.
>
> Please, advice needed urgently. Thanks a million.


try changing the gamma. this will lighten the shadows.


>

 
Reply With Quote
 
BD
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      04-24-2006
>I tried to adjust the overall lighting

First off - search the web for photoshop tutorials involving shadow and
contrast. The site www.lumunous-landscape.com has some very good
tutorials, and it's really stunning how effective the tweaks can be.

I have seen some tutorials on enhancing areas that are in shadow, and
it can be complicated, involving multiple layers, layer masks, and
filters. But start by googling it. I know I've seen tutorials which
will help you, but it's been awhile - I'll have to leave you to track
them down. Start with luminous-landscape.

I believe that making any 'global' changes to the image is not the
solution here - there's already far too much contrast/brightness in the
background for the subject, and making overall changes to the image,
IMO, will likely just exacerbate the problem.

Subjects appearing dark will have less contrast, and less color
saturation; in order to 'brighten' the subjects, you will likely have
to mask the areas containing the subjects, increase brightness and
contrast, and then deal with additional noise and hue problems. For
example - boosting the brightness of a subject too far will make the
adjustment very obvious.

As well, since the subjects are effectively in shadow, visible detail
will likely be reduced in those areas of the photo. Such detail cannot
easily be re-added.

As a first kick at the cat, my process would be:

-lasso one of the subjects that appears too dark;
-boost the brightness slightly, boost the contrast slightly
-play with the color saturation and hue sliders to see if they improve
the color balance between subject and background
-if the 'brightened' area appears grainy, use some of the noise filters
(perhaps Median) to soften it slightly.

As another option:

-adjust the entire image until the subjects look 'okay', or as okay as
you can make them - blow the background out of the water if you have
to.
-save this as a separate image
-open both images as layers, and link them with a layer mask
-use a soft brush to pull in the better portions of one image into the
other

The benefit of this route is that with a layer mask and a soft brush,
you don't have to be obsessive about lassooing precisely along the
border of the subject. In my experience, it's the sharp demarcation
between adjusted and non-adjusted portions of the image that are the
biggest giveaway; the layer mask and soft brush will help to ease that
demarcation.

If you haven't used layer transparency masks, they're very useful for
merging photos in this fashion

I don't know how bad the shadow effect is, but consider the fact that
if the subject is in shadow, the information required to make the
subject look correct (color range, for example) is simply not present
in that portion of the image. Information that _is_ in the image can be
massaged, but only to a certain point. In short, don't get your hopes
up too high...

best of luck!

BD

 
Reply With Quote
 
John McWilliams
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      04-24-2006
Gizmo wrote:
> <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
> news:(E-Mail Removed) ups.com...
>
>>I am incharge of the editing and compiling of the photos of my class
>>trip yesterday.
>>
>>We went to the beach for the photo-taking session this time.
>>
>>However, many of the photos were taken against the sun, meaning that
>>the camera itself is facing towards the sun, hence causing the subjects
>>of the photos appeared dark.
>>
>>Anyone here could help and tell me ways(anything, photoshop or whatever
>>softwares or services can be consider) to enhance the photos so I can
>>improve the lighting?
>>
>>I tried to adjust the overall lighting but it seems to push the
>>background colour a bit too far, making the photos look real odd and
>>somewhat distorted.
>>
>>Please, advice needed urgently. Thanks a million.

>
>
>
> In Photoshop;
> Image > Adjustments > Shaddow / highlight
>
>

That's the one. In PS CS [I + II] only, I believe. If you don't have
that version, the other suggestions kick in.

Or, go back to the beach and take along flash units. Tell the teacher
it's a learning experience.....

--
John McWilliams
 
Reply With Quote
 
Jeroen Wenting
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      04-24-2006

> However, many of the photos were taken against the sun, meaning that
> the camera itself is facing towards the sun, hence causing the subjects
> of the photos appeared dark.
>

tough luck. Learn to shoot properly.
That's the main problem of the current generation of "photographers". They
think they can just shoot any old crap and "fix it in photoshop".
You can't, don't even try.
Learn from your mistakes and move on, exposing properly the next time.

> Anyone here could help and tell me ways(anything, photoshop or whatever
> softwares or services can be consider) to enhance the photos so I can
> improve the lighting?
>

you can't. At most you can make total crap looking like not-quite-total
crap.

> I tried to adjust the overall lighting but it seems to push the
> background colour a bit too far, making the photos look real odd and
> somewhat distorted.
>

Crap in, crap out.

> Please, advice needed urgently. Thanks a million.
>

Nothing urgent in there for me.


 
Reply With Quote
 
Peter A.
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      04-24-2006

John McWilliams wrote:

> > In Photoshop;
> > Image > Adjustments > Shaddow / highlight
> >

> That's the one. In PS CS [I + II] only, I believe.


Elements (3+) has it as well. Enhance > Adjust Lighting >
Shadows/Highlights.

 
Reply With Quote
 
John McWilliams
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      04-24-2006
Jeroen Wenting wrote:

>>Anyone here could help and tell me ways(anything, photoshop or whatever
>>softwares or services can be consider) to enhance the photos so I can
>>improve the lighting?
>>

>
> you can't. At most you can make total crap looking like not-quite-total
> crap.
>

This is a student editor who's trying to do right with the poorly
exposed pictures some or many classmates submitted.

A lot of good advice has been given, which will work fine, depending on
the number of pixels present and the degree of underexposure.

--
John McWilliams

I know that you believe you understood what you think I said, but I'm
not sure you realize that what you heard is not what I meant.

 
Reply With Quote
 
Jim
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      04-24-2006

<(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
news:(E-Mail Removed) ups.com...
>I am incharge of the editing and compiling of the photos of my class
> trip yesterday.
>
> We went to the beach for the photo-taking session this time.
>
> However, many of the photos were taken against the sun, meaning that
> the camera itself is facing towards the sun, hence causing the subjects
> of the photos appeared dark.

Try using fill flash the next time. That is the way that most people would
go.
>
> Anyone here could help and tell me ways(anything, photoshop or whatever
> softwares or services can be consider) to enhance the photos so I can
> improve the lighting?

There are lots and lots of ways. In addition to the ways already suggested,
you could try making a selection of the darkened area. Then you adjust the
exposure of this region alone.
Another way is to use the curve tool to brighten the central area of the
histogram.
>
> I tried to adjust the overall lighting but it seems to push the
> background colour a bit too far, making the photos look real odd and
> somewhat distorted.

Yes, it certainly would.
>
> Please, advice needed urgently. Thanks a million.
>

Jim


 
Reply With Quote
 
 
 
Reply

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Re: How include a large array? Edward A. Falk C Programming 1 04-04-2013 08:07 PM
Bad media, bad files or bad Nero? John Computer Information 23 01-08-2008 09:17 PM
ActiveX apologetic Larry Seltzer... "Sun paid for malicious ActiveX code, and Firefox is bad, bad bad baad. please use ActiveX, it's secure and nice!" (ok, the last part is irony on my part) fernando.cassia@gmail.com Java 0 04-16-2005 10:05 PM
24 Season 3 Bad Bad Bad (Spoiler) nospam@nospam.com DVD Video 12 02-23-2005 03:28 AM
24 Season 3 Bad Bad Bad (Spoiler) nospam@nospam.com DVD Video 0 02-19-2005 01:10 AM



Advertisments