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point n shoot? slr?

 
 
cjcampbell
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      04-15-2006

Beck wrote:
> To me, a point and shoot camera has always been of the small pocketable
> type that have barely any manual controls and maybe a few set scenes.
>
> SLR would be a camera type (apart from being single lens reflex) that has
> full manual controls aswell as auto.
>
> I am curious as to what the middle cameras would be? You know like for
> example the Fuji S5500 that has a full range of manual controls but is not
> an SLR. Would that still be classed as a point and shoot camera?


Actually, an SLR is a camera using a mirror and prism to transmit the
image from the lens through the viewfinder. When you are looking
through the viewfinder you are looking through the lens. SLR cameras
should have interchangeable lenses. If your only criterion for an SLR
is one that you view your shot through the lens, even if it is
projected on an LCD, then almost all digital cameras would be SLRs.

A point and shoot camera originally was one that is usually used in a
fully automatic mode: you point it and shoot, hoping for the best. I
would consider some SLRs to be point and shoot cameras.

A "prosumer" camera is an amateur camera, not an SLR, that is really a
high end point and shoot. Although you were thinking of these cameras
as SLRs, they are not, really, as none of them have a mirror or a
prism.

A rangefinder camera is one that has an optical viewfinder off to the
side and has markings in the viewfinder to adjust for parallax and
distance. Some digital cameras have such a viewfinder but most people
are now composing their picture on the LCD. A lot of the cheaper point
and shoots have no viewfinder at all; you have to use the LCD.

So you see there can be considerable overlap in terms. A rangefinder or
SLR or a prosumer camera could also be a point and shoot.

 
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Jim Townsend
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      04-15-2006
Peter Chant wrote:

> Bill wrote:
>
>
>> Some people call the midrange P&S models ZLR cameras. They work similar
>> to an SLR with many of the same features, but with a fixed zoom lense. A
>> canon S2 IS would be one of these.

>
> But are they a reflex camera?



This is the REAL question. 'Reflex' refers to the mirror that is
REQUIRED to see through the lens in Single Lens Reflex (SLR) cameras.

A quick look at an online dictionary shows the FIRST definition of
"Reflex" as:

1. To reflect. [Obs.] --Shak.
[1913 Webster]

Without a mirror system designed to allow the user to focus through
the lens, a camera technically isn't an SLR because there is no
'reflex' happening.

But.. Things tend to get muddied with time.

Consider the wine Champagne. It originally meant a wine that was
made in the French province of Champagne.. (Hence the name). But today
the Napa Vally in California churns out the bubbly liquid and calls
it champagne too.

I think with the broad definitions in use now, an SLR can be just
about any camera with manual controls. (But I'll still be a purist and
look for a mirror before I call a camera an SLR).


 
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ruthjoyb@googlemail.com
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      04-15-2006
I feel like point and shoot my canonT90 SLR is in fixit shop
I am curious about digital camera via mobile phone
If I get sony Ericson I can point and shoot and send image by email to
friends
Rooty

 
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Ron Hunter
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      04-15-2006
Beck wrote:
> To me, a point and shoot camera has always been of the small pocketable
> type that have barely any manual controls and maybe a few set scenes.
>
> SLR would be a camera type (apart from being single lens reflex) that has
> full manual controls aswell as auto.
>
> I am curious as to what the middle cameras would be? You know like for
> example the Fuji S5500 that has a full range of manual controls but is not
> an SLR. Would that still be classed as a point and shoot camera?
>
> There is no real reason I need to know this, its just merely out of
> curiousity because in my experience the media tend to talk about either
> point and shoot or slr cameras.
>
>


The most appropriate designation I have seen for that type of camera is
'prosumer'. This implies a person who is still a 'consumer', but of the
more experienced, and knowledgeable type.
 
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David J Taylor
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      04-15-2006
Bill Funk wrote:
[]
> Really? I see alot of P&S cameras with optical viewfinders. Don't you?


None of my "P&S" cameras have an optical viewfinder, thank goodness! Mind
you, they fall more into the ZLR category than low-end P&S.

David


 
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David J Taylor
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      04-15-2006
Peter Chant wrote:
> Bill wrote:
>
>
>> Some people call the midrange P&S models ZLR cameras. They work
>> similar to an SLR with many of the same features, but with a fixed
>> zoom lense. A canon S2 IS would be one of these.

>
> But are they a reflex camera?


Like many digital cameras, the reflex is electronic.

David


 
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David J Taylor
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      04-15-2006
Beck wrote:
> "Bill" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
> news:(E-Mail Removed)...
>> Some people call the midrange P&S models ZLR cameras. They work
>> similar to an SLR with many of the same features, but with a fixed
>> zoom lense. A canon S2 IS would be one of these.

>
> Now that is something I have never come across. Will this become
> standard?


Adding a long zoom lens and image-stabilisation enhances the capability a
lot, and the long lens is often accomodated in an SLR-shaped body, hence
the term ZLR.

By the way, full-control ZLR cameras have their own newsgroup:

rec.photo.digital.zlr

as do the limited control P&S cameras:

rec.photo.digital.point+shoot

May maufacturers have jumped onto the ZLR bandwagon including Kodak, and
some who forgot that a long zoom lens without image stabilisation is of
more limited use (Fuji).

However, manufacturers such as Panasonic now offer a wide range of such
cameras including the ~US $300 ~300 gram Panasonic FZ5 and the
higher-resolution, but larger FZ30.

http://www.dpreview.com/reviews/panasonicfz5/

http://www.dpreview.com/reviews/panasonicfz30/

David


 
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J. Clarke
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      04-15-2006
Beck wrote:

>
> "Bill" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
> news:(E-Mail Removed)...
>
>> Some people call the midrange P&S models ZLR cameras. They work similar
>> to an SLR with many of the same features, but with a fixed zoom lense. A
>> canon S2 IS would be one of these.

>
> Now that is something I have never come across. Will this become
> standard?


There's no way to know--there is a newsgroup "rec.photo.digital.zlr" but
it's not very active. Really depends on whether the press and the
marketdroids pick it up or not.

--
--John
to email, dial "usenet" and validate
(was jclarke at eye bee em dot net)
 
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J. Clarke
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      04-15-2006
Bill Funk wrote:

> On Fri, 14 Apr 2006 22:47:20 +0100, "Adrian Boliston"
> <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
>
>>"Beck" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
>>news:444011c4$0$33901$(E-Mail Removed)...
>>
>>> To me, a point and shoot camera has always been of the small pocketable
>>> type that have barely any manual controls and maybe a few set scenes.
>>>
>>> SLR would be a camera type (apart from being single lens reflex) that
>>> has full manual controls aswell as auto.
>>>
>>> I am curious as to what the middle cameras would be? You know like for
>>> example the Fuji S5500 that has a full range of manual controls but is
>>> not
>>> an SLR. Would that still be classed as a point and shoot camera?
>>>
>>> There is no real reason I need to know this, its just merely out of
>>> curiousity because in my experience the media tend to talk about either
>>> point and shoot or slr cameras.

>>
>>From what I gather, it seems that the main factor which separates p&s to
>>dslr is the type of viewfinder.

>
> And I think it's the size of the sensor.
> There seems to be a disctinct seperation between cameras with APS-C
> (or thereabouts) and larger sensors (call them DSLRs), and the cameras
> with smaller sensors cal them P&S cameras).
> The differences ar emore than just sensor size. More control over the
> picture taking procedure;


When you control aperture, shutter speed, focus, zoom, and white balance
what additional control do you have in mind?

> removable lenses; faster processors (less
> shutter lag)


Shutter lag has little to do with processor speed. The speed of the focus
mechanism, which is more a function of the raw power of the focus motor,
tends to control

> ; less noise at higher ISOs.
>>
>>A dslr will give you a "real" preview image projected onto a ground glass
>>viewfinder, wheras a p&s will show the preview on a low-resolution "evf"
>>or electronic viewfinder, which can never really compare with the "real"
>>preview that a dslr gives. Another problem with the evf is that the image
>>often lags behind what is actually happening.

>
> Really? I see alot of P&S cameras with optical viewfinders. Don't you?


Ever use one? The cheap optical finders on point-and-shoots are not the
same as the through-the-lens viewing of an SLR or the parallax-corrected
rangefinder on a Leica M. If you're using the optical finder on a typical
point-and-shoot you don't really know what you've got until you look at the
stored image.

--
--John
to email, dial "usenet" and validate
(was jclarke at eye bee em dot net)
 
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dj_nme@hotmail.com
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      04-15-2006

J. Clarke wrote:

> Beck wrote:
>
> >
> > "Bill" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
> > news:(E-Mail Removed)...
> >
> >> Some people call the midrange P&S models ZLR cameras. They work similar
> >> to an SLR with many of the same features, but with a fixed zoom lense. A
> >> canon S2 IS would be one of these.

> >
> > Now that is something I have never come across. Will this become
> > standard?

>
> There's no way to know--there is a newsgroup "rec.photo.digital.zlr" but
> it's not very active. Really depends on whether the press and the
> marketdroids pick it up or not.


My personal spin on this "creative" name for EVF cameras is that it was
realy invented so that a small group of people could have there very
own newsgroup.
This group seemed to get annoyed that everytime in rec.photo.digital
they tried to use the silly term "ZLR", it was pointed out that none of
the cameras they described used any sort of reflex viewfinder and were
realy EVF cameras.
As far as I know there have only been a handful of true digital ZLR
cameras, all made by Olympus (the two that stood out as very good
digicams were the E-10n and the E-20n) and they were all acurately
described as DSLR cameras anyway.
Olympus was the main manufacturer of film ZLR cameras, which seemed to
be their answer to the advent of autofocus with other manufacturers: if
you (unfortunately) can't (or don't want to) compete, start a new
market segment.

 
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