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GPS and Digital Photography

 
 
Ted Edwards
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      04-13-2006
Jack wrote:
> The June issue of Digital Photographer has a good article on using a
> GPS(Garmin 60csx), Canon DSLR, and inexpensive software to make
> geo-positioning easier.


If you download and save your active track and your pictures to your
computer before doing anything to them, it is a trivial project to match
up the time stamps from the picture files and the GPS track log. In
fact it so easy it could even be done with one of those spread sheet
thingys.

Ted
 
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Dave Martindale
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      04-13-2006
"Happy Traveler" <(E-Mail Removed)> writes:
>These days, when virtually every 2oz cellphone has a simple GPS receiver
>built-in, how difficult can it be to add one to a 2lb DSLR?


Apparently the cellphone GPS receivers are not full independent GPS
receivers - they depend on the cellular data connection to a cell site
(which includes a full GPS receiver) for some of the data needed to get
a rapid location fix.

So if your camera happened to *also* be a cellphone, this technology
would work there. But for the average camera that is not a cellphone,
you'd need a more general-purpose GPS chipset. Not terribly difficult
to do, just not comparable to cellphone with GPS.

Dave
 
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Artoi
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      04-13-2006
In article <e1mcf2$b6$(E-Mail Removed)>, Dave Martindale
<(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:

> So if your camera happened to *also* be a cellphone, this technology
> would work there. But for the average camera that is not a cellphone,
> you'd need a more general-purpose GPS chipset. Not terribly difficult
> to do, just not comparable to cellphone with GPS.


No thanks. dSLR are already too baulky these days.

--
 
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J. Clarke
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      04-13-2006
Dave Martindale wrote:

> "Happy Traveler" <(E-Mail Removed)> writes:
>>These days, when virtually every 2oz cellphone has a simple GPS receiver
>>built-in, how difficult can it be to add one to a 2lb DSLR?

>
> Apparently the cellphone GPS receivers are not full independent GPS
> receivers - they depend on the cellular data connection to a cell site
> (which includes a full GPS receiver) for some of the data needed to get
> a rapid location fix.


I read that article too and the author is very confused.

There is no such thing as "partial GPS". To use differential GPS you need a
full standard GPS plus an additional receiver. The benefit of doing this
is that you get a time correction from the relatively nearby DGPS
transmitter that allows _very_ accurate positioning--this is mainly used in
surveying. One does not get a _faster_ fix--the time required to acquire
the satellites remains the same, and once the satellites are acquired the
fix is updated at very short intervals, how short depending on the
particular receiver but short enough to easily track the position of a
moving car--fast moving planes may need fancier hardware.

The cellular location system uses technology that may be related to or
derived from that used in the satellite-based system but it is based on the
cell towers and not on satellites--it may also be able to use a
satellite-based system if there is one in the phone but that's not the
usual setup.

I do wish that they had found something to call it other than GPS, as using
the same term to identify two systems that perform a related function gets
confusing quickly.

> So if your camera happened to *also* be a cellphone, this technology
> would work there. But for the average camera that is not a cellphone,
> you'd need a more general-purpose GPS chipset. Not terribly difficult
> to do, just not comparable to cellphone with GPS.
>
> Dave


--
--John
to email, dial "usenet" and validate
(was jclarke at eye bee em dot net)
 
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Phil Wheeler
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      04-13-2006
Ted Edwards wrote:
> Jack wrote:
>
>> The June issue of Digital Photographer has a good article on using a
>> GPS(Garmin 60csx), Canon DSLR, and inexpensive software to make
>> geo-positioning easier.

>
>
> If you download and save your active track and your pictures to your
> computer before doing anything to them, it is a trivial project to match
> up the time stamps from the picture files and the GPS track log. In
> fact it so easy it could even be done with one of those spread sheet
> thingys.
>


Last trip was 14 days and over 2000 images. Might stress my track memory
 
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Phil Wheeler
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      04-13-2006
Artoi wrote:
> In article <e1mcf2$b6$(E-Mail Removed)>, Dave Martindale
> <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
>
>
>>So if your camera happened to *also* be a cellphone, this technology
>>would work there. But for the average camera that is not a cellphone,
>>you'd need a more general-purpose GPS chipset. Not terribly difficult
>>to do, just not comparable to cellphone with GPS.

>
>
> No thanks. dSLR are already too baulky these days.
>


If it is bauking, get it serviced.

Phil
 
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Ted Edwards
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      04-13-2006
Phil Wheeler wrote:
> Last trip was 14 days and over 2000 images. Might stress my track
> memory


Hiking? Some of the hand helds might have enough memory for daily track
downloads and as long as you didn't mess with the saved picture files
other than copying them, the time stamps would still be valid.

If a vehicle was involved, a laptop could also have been.

Ted
 
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Phil Wheeler
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      04-14-2006
Ted Edwards wrote:
> Phil Wheeler wrote:
>
>> Last trip was 14 days and over 2000 images. Might stress my track
>> memory

>
>
> Hiking? Some of the hand helds might have enough memory for daily track
> downloads and as long as you didn't mess with the saved picture files
> other than copying them, the time stamps would still be valid.
>
> If a vehicle was involved, a laptop could also have been.
>


I generally do not hike with a laptop.
 
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Phil Wheeler
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      04-14-2006
Ted Edwards wrote:
> Phil Wheeler wrote:
>
>> Last trip was 14 days and over 2000 images. Might stress my track
>> memory

>
>
> Hiking? Some of the hand helds might have enough memory for daily track
> downloads and as long as you didn't mess with the saved picture files
> other than copying them, the time stamps would still be valid.
>
> If a vehicle was involved, a laptop could also have been.
>


Why speculate on a situation you were not in? Seems odd.

Don't need a GPSR to tell me what shots I took and where, period.

Phil
 
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Dave
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      04-14-2006
Just curious about using a GPS receiver and taking pictures. Why might
someone want to coordinate the two? Are they using the GPS to mark a
waypoint (coordinates) about where the image was taken? Just wondering what
other uses they have.




"Jack" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
news:C9r%f.101$(E-Mail Removed)...
> The June issue of Digital Photographer has a good article on using a
> GPS(Garmin 60csx), Canon DSLR, and inexpensive software to make
> geo-positioning easier.



 
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