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Is there a dslr on the market that does not require looking at it to make adjustments?

 
 
James Silverton
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      03-22-2006
http://www.velocityreviews.com/forums/(E-Mail Removed) wrote on 22 Mar 2006 14:34:22 -0800:

r> Hi Neil,
r> Thanks for the reply. I have strong opinions about how each
r> parameter should be set and I do not welcome comments from
r> the peanut section. I consider the non manual modes the
r> peanut section.

r> Thanks,
r> Ron

I never owned a Rollex twin lens reflex or a Hasselblad with a
viewing screen but I have used them once in a while and it's a
configuration with some real advantages. Do any of the cameras
with fold-out screens meet your requirements even if they are
not reflexes?

James Silverton.

 
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Jim Townsend
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      03-22-2006
(E-Mail Removed) wrote:

> Hi Jim,
> Braille has different connotations for me but you are the closest to
> taking my point.



OK.. If your intention was to get a lot of responses guessing
at what you were asking, you succeeded.

If you were looking for a specific and precise answer, you should have
structured your question differently.

What exactly are you after ?



 
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ronviers@gmail.com
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      03-22-2006
Thanks Jim,
I will try to be more clear in the future. I thought everyone would
know what I was talking about and it turns out
that no one did.
Here is what I should have said.
I like holding the camera in my lap, down around my hips, or whatever -
some place other than in front of my face - and I like to continuously
make adjustments while the situation changes. Sometimes I will raise
the camera and take a picture but usually the picture never happens so
I just keep adjusting. I find it distracting to have to look down or
to raise the camera and have to use the vew finder for something other
than compostion. Call it quirky but that is how I like to do it.

Thanks,
Ron

 
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Ryan
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      03-22-2006
(E-Mail Removed) wrote:

> I find it raises the emotional db level to point a camera at people. I
> would like to make all my adjustmenst; focal point, iso, aperture, etc.
> while holding the camera down around my hips. It would also be handy
> for shooting in the dark; silhouettes shadows etc.


I think familiarity (memorization) of your camera helps in this regard.

I shoot with a D70, often at night, and I don't have to look at it to
turn the dials and "feel" how many clicks they have turned.

Memorize the f-stop table and turn off incremental f-stops if you wish,
or else know that every 3 clicks is a full stop. (When set to 3rd stop
increments) After that, you just remember where your f-stop and
aperature is set, which perhaps you already do this part.

Similiarly, ISO, Whitebalance and Shooting mode (single, multi, timer)
can be done from memory, or by looking down while holding it.

As for focal length (or focus?), I think that could be tougher. I guess
you can use the readout on the lens, but I've not tried this so much.

From what I've seen on most dSLR models, the same would be true. Same
thing, different buttons.
 
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Scott W
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      03-23-2006
(E-Mail Removed) wrote:
> Thanks Jim,
> I will try to be more clear in the future. I thought everyone would
> know what I was talking about and it turns out
> that no one did.
> Here is what I should have said.
> I like holding the camera in my lap, down around my hips, or whatever -
> some place other than in front of my face - and I like to continuously
> make adjustments while the situation changes. Sometimes I will raise
> the camera and take a picture but usually the picture never happens so
> I just keep adjusting. I find it distracting to have to look down or
> to raise the camera and have to use the vew finder for something other
> than compostion. Call it quirky but that is how I like to do it.
>
> Thanks,
> Ron


It sounds like you want to make these adjustments without looking at
the camera, have I got that right?

If so just what adjustments are you talking about?

If you are just sitting there do you really need to be adjusting things
like the ISO?

If you are willing to look at the camera then just about any DSLR will
allow you to adjust the parameters while it is in your lap, if you are
not willing to look at the camera then just what is it that you think
you are going to be doing? Adjusting just by feel?

Scott

 
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David J. Littleboy
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      03-23-2006

<(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:

Just about every dSLR ever made has an LCD screen that allows you to set f
stop, shutter speed, and ISO. Almost every decent dSLR lens ever made has a
distance scale and a switch to (or way to) turn off autofocus. (The really
cheap consumer zooms like the Canon 55-200 don't have a distance scale, so
you'd have to use AF.)

So you can hold the camera in your lap or out of the way and adjust the
settings as you please.

David J. Littleboy
Tokyo, Japan


 
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ASAAR
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      03-23-2006
On 22 Mar 2006 15:48:03 -0800, (E-Mail Removed) wrote:

> I like holding the camera in my lap, down around my hips, or whatever -
> some place other than in front of my face - and I like to continuously
> make adjustments while the situation changes. Sometimes I will raise
> the camera and take a picture but usually the picture never happens so
> I just keep adjusting. I find it distracting to have to look down or
> to raise the camera and have to use the vew finder for something other
> than compostion. Call it quirky but that is how I like to do it.


That's what most P&S cameras can do since the LCD display usually
can show all of the parameters as you change them. If you're also
positioned advantageously and the camera has a swiveling LCD you
don't even have to raise the camera to take the shot - the LCD does
double duty as the viewfinder. Most DLSRs use the LCD for viewing
shots after you take them, but I think that one of the new Olympus
DSLRs has "live preview", allowing you to duplicate what P&S owners
have been able to do for years. Alternatively, aren't there some
other DSLRs that have a simple LCD display on the top of the camera
that would show settings, such as shutter speed, aperture, ISO, etc?
Probably some of the Nikon DSLRs, since there have been some
messages from people indicating that their top LCD doesn't blank out
when the camera is powered off. Not owning or having used one, I
can't tell you what specific parameters are shown in the display.

 
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Scott W
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      03-23-2006
AAR wrote:
> On 22 Mar 2006 15:48:03 -0800, (E-Mail Removed) wrote:
>
> > I like holding the camera in my lap, down around my hips, or whatever -
> > some place other than in front of my face - and I like to continuously
> > make adjustments while the situation changes. Sometimes I will raise
> > the camera and take a picture but usually the picture never happens so
> > I just keep adjusting. I find it distracting to have to look down or
> > to raise the camera and have to use the vew finder for something other
> > than compostion. Call it quirky but that is how I like to do it.

>
> That's what most P&S cameras can do since the LCD display usually
> can show all of the parameters as you change them. If you're also
> positioned advantageously and the camera has a swiveling LCD you
> don't even have to raise the camera to take the shot - the LCD does
> double duty as the viewfinder. Most DLSRs use the LCD for viewing
> shots after you take them, but I think that one of the new Olympus
> DSLRs has "live preview", allowing you to duplicate what P&S owners
> have been able to do for years. Alternatively, aren't there some
> other DSLRs that have a simple LCD display on the top of the camera
> that would show settings, such as shutter speed, aperture, ISO, etc?
> Probably some of the Nikon DSLRs, since there have been some
> messages from people indicating that their top LCD doesn't blank out
> when the camera is powered off. Not owning or having used one, I
> can't tell you what specific parameters are shown in the display.


Canon shows you all the stuff on top, the back screen it pretty much
off unless you are viewing a photo or messing with a menu.

Scott

 
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Bill Funk
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      03-23-2006
On 22 Mar 2006 14:34:22 -0800, "(E-Mail Removed)"
<(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:

>Hi Neil,
>Thanks for the reply. I have strong opinions about how each parameter
>should be set and I do not welcome comments from the peanut section. I
>consider the non manual modes the peanut section.
>
>Thanks,
>Ron


You're sandbagging us, Ron.
If you'd just come out and tell us what you *really* want, maybe we
could help.
I sugested auto mode twice, and you ignored it. Now I find that you
really want to do everything manually. Why couldn't you have said that
first, or even rreplied when I asked if that's what you wanted?

Here's what you need to do: memorize how the camera's controls work,
then remember what settings are currently being used. Then, using you
rmemorized controls, adjust as you need.
Any DSLR will let you do this.
Or, again, is this not what you want?
The above is not a rhetorical question.

--
Bill Funk
replace "g" with "a"
 
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cjcampbell
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      03-23-2006

(E-Mail Removed) wrote:
> Thanks,
> Ron


You are welcome. Most DSLRs are designed to be easy to use in the dark
or at waist level. It is simply a matter of becoming familiar with the
controls. Nikons have a reputation of being a little more intuitive
about this, but legions of Canon owners have managed it as well. What
it really takes is practice. You learn fairly quickly how much you can
turn each lens to get the zoom you want, where each button is, and how
many clicks of the dial it is to set aperture or shutter speed.

I use my D70 quite a lot without looking at it at all. I frequently
shoot without even looking through the viewfinder, taking several shots
at slightly different angles to make sure I get the composition I want.
I find this especially useful for pictures where the camera is at or
near the ground level, holding the camera overhead to shoot over crowds
or other obstructions (or simply to get a less distorted view of a
building), or even just walking down the street.

Most DSLRs are black for a reason -- studies have shown that black
cameras are less "visible," meaning "threatening" to most subjects.
Even so, stick any lens that has a 77mm filter on the front and you are
going to have a seriously intimidating piece of equipment. Sneakiness
does not help matters; it just makes people jittery all the time.
Digital cameras can be a big help in putting people at ease, as can a
good photographer's banter. Take a few trial shots, letting people look
at the digital picture. Keep up the chatter and always act like you
know exactly what you are doing. Once you win their trust you become
invisible and you can snap away and nobody cares.

 
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