Velocity Reviews - Computer Hardware Reviews

Velocity Reviews > Newsgroups > Computing > Digital Photography > Reproducing white at ISO 100

Reply
Thread Tools

Reproducing white at ISO 100

 
 
ronviers@gmail.com
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      03-22-2006
When I shoot a white backdrop at ISO 100 the result is gray. The
histogram shows the information to be in the center. Why is that? I
have tried various light levels and apertures but it stays gray. I can
get it to be white if I use a higher ISO.

Thanks,
Ron

 
Reply With Quote
 
 
 
 
Scott W
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      03-22-2006

http://www.velocityreviews.com/forums/(E-Mail Removed) wrote:
> When I shoot a white backdrop at ISO 100 the result is gray. The
> histogram shows the information to be in the center. Why is that? I
> have tried various light levels and apertures but it stays gray. I can
> get it to be white if I use a higher ISO.
>
> Thanks,
> Ron


Expsoure meters tend to assume that average scene will be at 18% of
white. So when you photograph a uniform scene like a backdrop it will
come out at about 18% gray.

You need to use you EV adjustment to correct for this, or you can edit
that photo after the fact. In tricky lighting it is a good idea to
look at the histogram of the photo to see how the exposure is coming
out.

Scott

 
Reply With Quote
 
 
 
 
ronviers@gmail.com
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      03-22-2006
Hi Scott, thank you for information.
Why didn't I think of that. I am using manual mode so I just stopped
up two clicks past when the indicator pegs and it worked perfectly.
Until I learn what I am doing I will take a practice picture picture,
check the histogram, then reset the exposure. The only problem I had
was that I had to close the aperture a tad to allow for the increased
time but for these photos it will not be the end of the world.

Thanks again

 
Reply With Quote
 
ronviers@gmail.com
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      03-22-2006
Hi Scott, thank you for information.
Why didn't I think of that. I am using manual mode so I just stopped
up two clicks past when the indicator pegs and it worked perfectly.
Until I learn what I am doing I will take a practice picture picture,
check the histogram, then reset the exposure. The only problem I had
was that I had to close the aperture a tad to allow for the increased
time but for these photos it will not be the end of the world.

Thanks again

 
Reply With Quote
 
Rich
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      03-22-2006
On 22 Mar 2006 08:37:54 -0800, "(E-Mail Removed)"
<(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:

>When I shoot a white backdrop at ISO 100 the result is gray. The
>histogram shows the information to be in the center. Why is that? I
>have tried various light levels and apertures but it stays gray. I can
>get it to be white if I use a higher ISO.
>
>Thanks,
>Ron


Everyone must learn the Zone System. Ansel's work still has
value.
-Rich
 
Reply With Quote
 
Jim Townsend
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      03-22-2006
(E-Mail Removed) wrote:


> Until I learn what I am doing I will take a practice picture picture,
> check the histogram, then reset the exposure.


I KNOW what I'm doing, yet I still check the histogram often to make
sure the exposure is right


 
Reply With Quote
 
Scott W
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      03-22-2006
Rich wrote:
> On 22 Mar 2006 08:37:54 -0800, "(E-Mail Removed)"
> <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
>
> >When I shoot a white backdrop at ISO 100 the result is gray. The
> >histogram shows the information to be in the center. Why is that? I
> >have tried various light levels and apertures but it stays gray. I can
> >get it to be white if I use a higher ISO.
> >
> >Thanks,
> >Ron

>
> Everyone must learn the Zone System. Ansel's work still has


This is pretty basic stuff, I don't think we really need to bring the
Zone system in for this one.

Scott

 
Reply With Quote
 
secheese
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      03-22-2006
On Wed, 22 Mar 2006 13:52:41 -0600, Jim Townsend <(E-Mail Removed)>
wrote:

>(E-Mail Removed) wrote:
>
>
>> Until I learn what I am doing I will take a practice picture picture,
>> check the histogram, then reset the exposure.

>
>I KNOW what I'm doing, yet I still check the histogram often to make
>sure the exposure is right


The histogram doesn't indicate right or wrong exposure, any more than
a thermometer indicates right or wrong temperature. It's up to the
photographer to interpret what the histogram is displaying. For
example, I may intentionally overexpose a snowy scene and have the
histogram indicate many pixels at the high end. Is this wrong? Of
course not; it's what I wanted.

 
Reply With Quote
 
Scott W
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      03-23-2006
secheese wrote:
> On Wed, 22 Mar 2006 13:52:41 -0600, Jim Townsend <(E-Mail Removed)>
> wrote:
>
> >(E-Mail Removed) wrote:
> >
> >
> >> Until I learn what I am doing I will take a practice picture picture,
> >> check the histogram, then reset the exposure.

> >
> >I KNOW what I'm doing, yet I still check the histogram often to make
> >sure the exposure is right

>
> The histogram doesn't indicate right or wrong exposure, any more than
> a thermometer indicates right or wrong temperature. It's up to the
> photographer to interpret what the histogram is displaying. For
> example, I may intentionally overexpose a snowy scene and have the
> histogram indicate many pixels at the high end. Is this wrong? Of
> course not; it's what I wanted.


In this case the histogram will tell you if the exposure is wrong. He
has a large unifrom surface that he wants to come out white, pretty
easy to see this on a histogram.

Scott

 
Reply With Quote
 
David J. Littleboy
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      03-23-2006

"Scott W" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
> Rich wrote:
>>
>> Everyone must learn the Zone System. Ansel's work still has

>
> This is pretty basic stuff, I don't think we really need to bring the
> Zone system in for this one.


The whole zone system is a bit overmuch, but zone exposure is certainly
worth learning. This guy's books explain it quite well. Another book worth
reading is "The Zone System for 35mm Photographers". I find it's
descriptions and examples of the different zones useful, although the
reproduction of the photos in the book is way too flat (they don't have a
good black).

http://www.spotmetering.com/

David J. Littleboy
Tokyo, Japan


 
Reply With Quote
 
 
 
Reply

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Tetration (print 100^100^100^100^100^100^100^100^100^100^100^100^100^100) jononanon@googlemail.com C Programming 5 04-25-2012 08:49 PM
Is Sigma's SD10 at ISO 1600 better than Canon's 1Ds at ISO 100? Georgette Preddy Digital Photography 14 07-15-2004 04:16 AM



Advertisments