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What is sports mode? Fuji 5200 equiv?

 
 
Chris
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      03-21-2006
I got a Fuji 5200 partly because I thought the high ISO/short exposure
would be good for sports photography. But it doesn't have a "sports
mode" per se that some cameras have. I assume the meaning of "sports
mode" varies with the capabilties of a particular camera, but what is
thistypically trying to accoplish? What would be the corresponding
settings on a 5200?

 
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ASAAR
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      03-21-2006
On 20 Mar 2006 22:31:48 -0800, Chris wrote:

> I got a Fuji 5200 partly because I thought the high ISO/short exposure
> would be good for sports photography. But it doesn't have a "sports
> mode" per se that some cameras have. I assume the meaning of "sports
> mode" varies with the capabilties of a particular camera, but what is
> thistypically trying to accoplish? What would be the corresponding
> settings on a 5200?


Lack of a sports mode is no big deal. You should be able to dial
in more useful settings than the camera would have. The Fuji S5100
was replaced by the S5200 and is quite similar. It had a sports
mode. According to the manual, when sports mode is used:

> The priority to faster shutter speeds is given.


> The camera selects the "100" sensitivity setting. Choose the
> sensitivity setting that best suits the condition.


It's highly unlikely that anyone reading this will know what it
really means. In fact, the manual says the same thing when it
describes the other shooting modes. What the camera actually does
is this: It has an ISO AUTO setting. This is relatively worthless,
as it almost always uses ISO 100, no matter how dark or bright the
lighting is. If it's extremely dark the camera *might* use ISO 200,
but it never goes higher than that. This ISO AUTO setting is only
available in the AUTO shooting mode. If it is set to AUTO and the
shooting mode is changed to any other mode (P, A, S, M, sports,
landscape, etc) ISO 100 is used. You may take pictures, but as long
as the ISO wasn't actually modified in the menu, when you put the
camera back to AUTO mode, ISO AUTO is restored. If, however, you
manually changed the ISO in any mode, when the camera is returned to
AUTO mode the camera does not revert to AUTO ISO, but continues to
use whatever ISO value it was last set to.


According to the manual's tables of functions and menu options,
when using sports mode:

You can't use macro mode.
You can't use red-eye reduction.
You can't use slow synch flash.
You can't use auto bracketing.
You can't use long period (up to 40 frames) continuous shooting.
You can't use exposure compensation.

White Balance is not a menu option (AUTO is used).
AF mode is not a menu option (CENTER is used)
Photometry (metering) is not a menu option (MULTI is used)
Bracketing is not a menu option (+/- 1/3 EV is used)
Sharpness is not a menu option (NORMAL is used)
Flash adjustment is not a menu option (+/- 0 is used)

The S5100 doesn't have any C(ustom) settings capabilities, as
some other cameras do. If the S5200 has Custom settings, you could
create one that mimics the S5100's sports mode.

 
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Andy Lee
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      03-21-2006
On 20 Mar 2006 22:31:48 -0800, "Chris" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:

>I got a Fuji 5200 partly because I thought the high ISO/short exposure
>would be good for sports photography. But it doesn't have a "sports
>mode" per se that some cameras have. I assume the meaning of "sports
>mode" varies with the capabilties of a particular camera, but what is
>thistypically trying to accoplish? What would be the corresponding
>settings on a 5200?



Just use the S mode (This is shutter priority) from PASM this allows
you to choose the shutter speed you want for the type of sport you are
covering and the camera will take of all the other settings that are
needed to get the correct exposure..

The shutter speed you need will vary with the type of sport you are
actually shooting for high speed motor sport you will need speeds up
to say 1/1000 sec for things like Football maybe around server 1/100
sec earliest way to tell is set a speed take a few shots take a look
on the screen if the action is "frozen" then you have a fast enough
shutter speed if not then you need to increase it a bit at a time till
you get the desired result.

Of course if you want some speed blur effects then vary shutter speed
as required.

P.S Setting the speed manually is OK so long as your camera can manage
to alter everything else enough to get the correct exposure this will
depend on the abilities of the camera wrt aperture and ISO rating and
also the available light levels.
 
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Chris
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      03-21-2006
As you describe the sports mode, it seems to do approximately nothing.
If all those other features are disabled, could it increase the
response time maybe? Otherwise I don't see that it does much.

 
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ASAAR
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      03-21-2006
On 21 Mar 2006 07:16:30 -0800, Chris wrote:

> As you describe the sports mode, it seems to do approximately nothing.
> If all those other features are disabled, could it increase the
> response time maybe? Otherwise I don't see that it does much.


It actually does quite a bit, not all of it good, but is designed
to guarantee reasonable performance for fast moving sports shots.
Some of them would prevent the response time from increasing (making
the camera more responsive) which is a good thing for sports shots.


>> The priority to faster shutter speeds is given.


I can't say that the camera would make the best decisions, but it
would protect those that know nothing about photography from
unknowingly using a horrendously slow shutter speed selected by the
camera in P or A mode.

If you don't remember the various modes the camera might have
been set to, perhaps days or weeks earlier, some of them might
interfere with sports shots, so the camera overrides some of these
settings, using reasonable defaults.

>> You can't use macro mode.


If the camera was left in macro mode, it would probably waste a
lot of time trying to focus (and it might fail) since macro mode is
intended to be used only at closer distances than most sports shots.


>> You can't use red-eye reduction.


If the flash was used, red-eye preflashes would introduce an
unnecessarily long delay between when the shutter is pressed and
when the picture is shot. You'd probably miss what you were trying
to capture.


>> You can't use slow synch flash.


This uses a slow shutter speed - not what you want for sports
shots.


>> You can't use auto bracketing.


Exposure bracketing can be useful for stationary objects. For
sports shots this is not an acceptable substitute for one of the
continuous shooting modes.


>> You can't use long period (up to 40 frames) continuous shooting.


Also not good for sports shots since the S5100 (and probably the
S5200) determines the focus for the first frame and doesn't adjust
it for subsequent shots in the continuous burst. If the subject
moves during the sequence, focus would be off.


>> You can't use exposure compensation.


I'm not sure why this isn't allowed. Maybe to protect you from a
previous setting that might have been forgotten.


>> White Balance is not a menu option (AUTO is used).


Moving subjects could move into areas having different
illumination.


>> AF mode is not a menu option (CENTER is used)


There may be many subjects moving in the shot. This lets *you*
determine which one the camera should try to get in focus.


>> Photometry (metering) is not a menu option (MULTI is used)


This is a toss-up. It might often be the best metering mode, but
not always.


>> Bracketing is not a menu option (+/- 1/3 EV is used)


I'm not sure why the manual says 1/3 EV is used since bracketing
is supposedly disallowed in sports mode. This might be an error.


So all things considered, as I've already indicated, sports mode
doesn't choose the ideal settings, but prevents many really bad ones
from being used inadvertently.

 
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