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What is the f/16 rule ?

 
 
Bill Funk
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      11-22-2005
On Tue, 22 Nov 2005 17:40:01 -0500, ASAAR <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:

>On 22 Nov 2005 13:46:44 -0800, Scott W wrote:
>
>> Ok I have not heard about mooney 8. You are not trying to say that
>> under moon light you would open the aperture two stops and be the same
>> as in sun light? Under moon light, even full moon light, you need LONG
>> exposures.

>
> It *might* be a simple misunderstanding (by Jim, not you) but I'm
>not sure. You do need a much longer exposure to take pictures by
>moonlight. But if you want to take a picture of the moon (which is
>illuminated by the same sun that illuminates the earth), Mooney 8
>should do nicely. Maybe even Mooney 11. Or maybe he meant that you
>need a Mooney 8 minute exposure? <g> But by the same token, if he
>wants to take a picture of the surface of the sun, he'd better not
>try to use a similar variant of the Sunny 16 rule.


A picture of the moon would also use the Sunny 16 rule.
The moon is a bright sun-lit object. The reflected light is the same
as a subject here on earth, it just takes up a smaller portion of the
background.
Try it; it works!

--
Bill Funk
Replace "g" with "a"
funktionality.blogspot.com
 
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eawckyegcy@yahoo.com
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      11-22-2005
Bill Funk wrote:

> A picture of the moon would also use the Sunny 16 rule.
> The moon is a bright sun-lit object. The reflected light is the same
> as a subject here on earth, it just takes up a smaller portion of the
> background.
> Try it; it works!


I take pictures of the Moon all the time. "Sunny f/16" produces
woefully underexposed images.

www.google.com: lunar albedo

 
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Jasen
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      11-22-2005

<(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
news:(E-Mail Removed) oups.com...
> Bert Hyman wrote:
>
>> http://www.velocityreviews.com/forums/(E-Mail Removed) () wrote:
>>
>> > RON wrote:
>> >
>> >> I do not know the answer so to me this is not a dumb question.
>> >
>> > Your answer can be found at www.just****inggoogleit.com

>>
>> As can the answer to just about every question ever posed in this
>> newsgroup, or any other newsgroup.

>
> I early await your demonstration of this claim.


I eagerly await you learning to spell.

>
>> Are you suggesting that the newsgroup be shut down?

>
> Are you suggesting that it is not sound advice that any question should
> be first given to google? Just type the in, verbatim. What do you
> have to lose?
>



 
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Bob Williams
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      11-22-2005


RON wrote:

> I do not know the answer so to me this is not a dumb question.
> Thanks for your time



At the risk of being called a party pooper the answer is as follows:
For an average subject in direct sunlight, the correct exposure is f=16
at 1/ISO film speed.
Ex: Using ISO 100 film, (or the ISO 100 setting on a digital camera),
the correct exposure would be f16 at 1/100 sec.
The rule is sometimes called the "Sunny 16" rule.
BTW, you can check the accuracy of your camera's light meter by focusing
on a standard Kodak 18% gray card (or equivalent) placed in direct
sunlight on a sunny day.
Bob Williams

 
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ASAAR
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      11-23-2005
On Tue, 22 Nov 2005 15:50:10 -0700, Bill Funk wrote:

> A picture of the moon would also use the Sunny 16 rule.
> The moon is a bright sun-lit object. The reflected light is the same
> as a subject here on earth, it just takes up a smaller portion of the
> background.


But when sunlit, the full moon is much farther than the earth is
from the sun, doncha know? Yeah, I had my doubts, which is why
I suggested a shift from Mooney 8 to Mooney 11, but I don't know the
real color and reflectivity of the moon's surface. Unlike some
astronauts, I have no rock samples to check. Is the surface really
equivalent to an 18% gray card? Area 51 photographers want to know.

 
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Peter
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      11-23-2005
(E-Mail Removed) wrote:
> Bill Funk wrote:
>
> > A picture of the moon would also use the Sunny 16 rule.
> > The moon is a bright sun-lit object. The reflected light is the same
> > as a subject here on earth, it just takes up a smaller portion of the
> > background.
> > Try it; it works!

>
> I take pictures of the Moon all the time. "Sunny f/16" produces
> woefully underexposed images.


It depends on what you think the moon is supposed to look like.
If you took a lightmeter and grey card to the moon, you would
get the sunny f/16 reading. If you want the moon to look bright
rather than a dull sort of grey, then you will want to over expose it.

Peter.
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(E-Mail Removed)

 
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Neil Harrington
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      11-23-2005

"Bill Funk" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
news:(E-Mail Removed)...
> On Tue, 22 Nov 2005 17:40:01 -0500, ASAAR <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:

[ . . . ]
>
> A picture of the moon would also use the Sunny 16 rule.
> The moon is a bright sun-lit object.


It is, but the moon's reflectance is not necessarily the same as typical
earthly subjects. What I read somewhere is "sunny 16" doesn't do it for the
moon, you need at least another stop or two. I have no experience in this
myself.

Neil


 
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Peter
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      11-23-2005

ASAAR wrote:
> On Tue, 22 Nov 2005 15:50:10 -0700, Bill Funk wrote:
>
> > A picture of the moon would also use the Sunny 16 rule.
> > The moon is a bright sun-lit object. The reflected light is the same
> > as a subject here on earth, it just takes up a smaller portion of the
> > background.

>
> But when sunlit, the full moon is much farther than the earth is
> from the sun, doncha know? Yeah, I had my doubts, which is why
> I suggested a shift from Mooney 8 to Mooney 11, but I don't know the
> real color and reflectivity of the moon's surface. Unlike some
> astronauts, I have no rock samples to check. Is the surface really
> equivalent to an 18% gray card? Area 51 photographers want to know.


The astronauts shot a fair amount of Ektachrome 64 on the moon. From
what I understand most of the exposures were 1/500 at f/5.6 or 1/250 at
f/8.

Some pictures can be found here:
<http://nssdc.gsfc.nasa.gov/imgcat/html/group_page/EM.html>

Peter.
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(E-Mail Removed)

 
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Matt Ion
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      11-23-2005
Mike Forrest wrote:

> For quick shoot such as kids etc this is much faster and more accurate
> than the light meter.


It's also handy if you have an old inherited camera without built-in
metering and can't afford a light meter... like the several years I shot
with an old 1953-vintage Argus C-3 "brick" camera


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Frank ess
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      11-23-2005
Matt Ion wrote:
> Mike Forrest wrote:
>
>> For quick shoot such as kids etc this is much faster and more
>> accurate than the light meter.

>
> It's also handy if you have an old inherited camera without built-in
> metering and can't afford a light meter... like the several years I
> shot with an old 1953-vintage Argus C-3 "brick" camera
>


Argus C3 picture from 1956:
http://www.fototime.com/3A548A515C8B19C/orig.jpg

 
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