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converting a random string of bits into a TCP/IP packet

 
 
Perdition
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      11-14-2005
I have encrypted data which I would like to send over the net, but I
don't know how to make the router interpret them into data, all it sees
is an endless string of bits.
I need a way, and I don't care how complex or expensive to make the
router understand this code.
if you know any product, hardware, interface or anything else that can
add an IP packet format or any other third/second level protocol
(HDLC,SDLC,DECNET..) from data, please help.

Thanks a bunch, you rock on many levels, all seven of them,
Michael

 
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Merv
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      11-14-2005

You could try using a File Transfer Protocol FTP) utility; plenty of
them available.

 
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Perdition
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      11-14-2005
I don't see how an FTP utility is used between a router and a hardware
based encrypter to pack the data into a packet so the router can route
the information properly, can you elaborate please?

 
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Rex Johnson
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      11-14-2005
"Perdition" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
news:(E-Mail Removed) ups.com...
>I have encrypted data which I would like to send over the net, but I
> don't know how to make the router interpret them into data, all it sees
> is an endless string of bits.
> I need a way, and I don't care how complex or expensive to make the
> router understand this code.
> if you know any product, hardware, interface or anything else that can
> add an IP packet format or any other third/second level protocol
> (HDLC,SDLC,DECNET..) from data, please help.
>
> Thanks a bunch, you rock on many levels, all seven of them,
> Michael
>


How about netcat?

http://netcat.sourceforge.net/



 
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Perdition
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      11-14-2005
I'm not sure this is the program for me, i have data and i bring it
through a hardware encrypter so it is then transformed into a series of
encrypted bytes, meaning it is entirely of the physical layer without
any flags or what not to say when it begins or ends. I then need to
have it packed into a third layer packet so that a router will know how
to transport it. on some other network is another encrypter and if need
be, a program to do the opposite of what was done on the original
network. That means take the third layer information and decapsulate it
entirely to raw data. Then the encryptor will use the same key in order
to interpret the data. I didn't understand from the netcat website
whether or not it can accept data through a port which doesn't have any
discernable headers. It has to be data that is transported from one
network to another, the window size will be the only thing to stop the
flow between encapsulations. Any thoughts?

 
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Andy Furnell
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      11-14-2005
On 2005-11-14, Perdition <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
> I'm not sure this is the program for me, i have data and i bring it
> through a hardware encrypter so it is then transformed into a series of
> encrypted bytes, meaning it is entirely of the physical layer without
> any flags or what not to say when it begins or ends. I then need to
> have it packed into a third layer packet so that a router will know how
> to transport it. on some other network is another encrypter and if need
> be, a program to do the opposite of what was done on the original
> network. That means take the third layer information and decapsulate it
> entirely to raw data. Then the encryptor will use the same key in order
> to interpret the data. I didn't understand from the netcat website
> whether or not it can accept data through a port which doesn't have any
> discernable headers. It has to be data that is transported from one
> network to another, the window size will be the only thing to stop the
> flow between encapsulations. Any thoughts?
>


Let me get this straight.. You've got a hardware encrypter that takes a
stream of data in on one network port, encrypts it, and spits it out on
another port connected to your router? Something like tinc
<http://www.tinc-vpn.org> would (technically) do the job.. Sit it in
between your encrpyter device and your router and configure it in 'hub'
mode, where it will listen promiscuously on one interface, and to encapsulate
anything it hears with an IP header for broadcasting to another tinc
server. Once it hits the other end, the IP header will be stripped off
and the underlying data spat back out to whatever's on the other side.
The only thing I'm not sure about is whether it will blindly accept and
retransmit frames with no valid MAC hdr/CRC..

If you're going to be going to such trouble, you would probably be better
just implementing this as an IPSEC VPN and removing the hardware encrypters
altogether, though? Seems that would be a much simpler solution..

Andy
 
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Rex Johnson
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      11-14-2005

"Perdition" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
news:(E-Mail Removed) ups.com...
> I'm not sure this is the program for me, i have data and i bring it
> through a hardware encrypter so it is then transformed into a series of
> encrypted bytes, meaning it is entirely of the physical layer without
> any flags or what not to say when it begins or ends. I then need to
> have it packed into a third layer packet so that a router will know how
> to transport it. on some other network is another encrypter and if need
> be, a program to do the opposite of what was done on the original
> network. That means take the third layer information and decapsulate it
> entirely to raw data. Then the encryptor will use the same key in order
> to interpret the data. I didn't understand from the netcat website
> whether or not it can accept data through a port which doesn't have any
> discernable headers. It has to be data that is transported from one
> network to another, the window size will be the only thing to stop the
> flow between encapsulations. Any thoughts?
>


What is the "hardware" between this hardware encryptor and the router? What
kind of hardware encryptor is it? Does it have an ethernet card? Or is
that what your question is?


 
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Perdition
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      11-16-2005
a hardware encrypter is what certain militaries use to encrypt data.
the output of a hardware encrypter is the data that it received from a
host but the bits have been encrypted so that any encapsulation that
took place has made the data undiscernable, including headers and such.
to reverse the process the same key is used on the other side with
another hardware encrypter. and so i need a program to take bits which
have no discernable headers (because all the data is encrypted) and
encapsulate it into a third layer protocol so that a router can route
it properly. Assume price isn't a factor, although free software would
definetly be a bonus ^_^ any thoughts?

DTE -> Encrypter -> Encapsulator to a third layer protocol -> router ->
modem

 
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Walter Roberson
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      11-16-2005
In article <(E-Mail Removed). com>,
Perdition <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
>so i need a program to take bits which
>have no discernable headers (because all the data is encrypted) and
>encapsulate it into a third layer protocol so that a router can route
>it properly.


ttcp or netcat

For ttcp, on the source end use ttcp -t DESTINATIONHOST
and on the destination end use ttcp -r

On the source end, where you have the bit stream, if
the bit stream is obtained from a program, pipe that program
into ttcp, or have that program popen() to ttcp and write the data
to it; if the bit stream comes across as a device, then
use redirect from the device .

On the other end do the reverse in order to get the data into
the encryption device.
--
I am spammed, therefore I am.
 
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Perdition
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      11-16-2005
netcat's website states: Netcat is a utility that is able to write and
read data across TCP and UDP network connections.
How would I use it so that it would read from one port a stream of
bits which can't possibly be interpreted as having any headers or
footers, and encapsulate it into a packet which will be sent to a
different port? I remind you that the stream of bits don't include any
flags and are entirely random. The bit stream does not arrive from a
program, it arrives directly from the hardware encrypter.
TTCP's website states that it's a program to benchmark tcp/udp
performance between two systems but not how it could get a stream of
non-encapsulated bits.

 
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