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cleaning inside camera mirror ?

 
 
RJ45
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      06-04-2005
HEllo,
I have a brand NEW Pentax *ist DS.
I Am satisfied of my camera.
but changing from lens to another lens I accidentally
made the internal mirror dirty with a dirt spot and it
was not dust.
I could clean it with a standard product to clean lenses and inside
camera mirror but it was VERY HARD I took a long time.. I used a very very soft
cloth to do it.
IT can happen that the inside get dirty so here I want to make a
question.
Which is the proper way to clean the lenses and/or inside mirror of the
cameras ? with which tools ?
Can the internal mirror get damaged by products if using proper camera
products ?
Which is the best way to clean camera internals ?
thanks

Rick

 
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Charles Schuler
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      06-04-2005
Ear syringe (clean!) or rocket blower can be used to blow off particles.
More stubborn particles can be removed with a clean artist's brush. Also,
see http://www.photosol.com/eclipseproduct.htm


 
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Roy
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      06-04-2005
"RJ45" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
news:(E-Mail Removed)...
> HEllo,
> I have a brand NEW Pentax *ist DS.
> I Am satisfied of my camera.
> but changing from lens to another lens I accidentally
> made the internal mirror dirty with a dirt spot and it
> was not dust.
> I could clean it with a standard product to clean lenses and inside
> camera mirror but it was VERY HARD I took a long time.. I used a very very
> soft
> cloth to do it.
> IT can happen that the inside get dirty so here I want to make a
> question.
> Which is the proper way to clean the lenses and/or inside mirror of the
> cameras ? with which tools ?
> Can the internal mirror get damaged by products if using proper camera
> products ?
> Which is the best way to clean camera internals ?
> thanks
>
> Rick
>


Hi there.

The Reflex Mirror is different from almost any other mirror you are going to
come across. The reflective surface is ON TOP of the Glass, not below it.
It is incredibly easy to damage it.

The normal rule is Do Not touch It with anything.

If it gets very dusty, use a blower, without the brush. Dirt marks on the
mirror are usually so out of focus that they will not affect your viewfinder
image. If you must touch it, then a clean artists sable brush should be
used, and used very gently.

Point the lens opening downwards when changing lenses to avoid dirt getting
inside.

The best way to clean camera interiors, is with a miniature vacuum, (the
kind that runs on 1 AA or the little 9V battery), without letting the end
of the suction tube touch anything. The Shutter Blades are also very easy
to damage, and replacing a shutter mechanism is expensive.

Roy G


 
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Don
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      06-05-2005
Have a look at these sites:

http://194.100.88.243/petteri/pont/H...ur_Sensor.html
http://www.visibledust.com/

Would be interested in other comments from the group once they have read the
two/three articles about this. I was about to plunk out about $150 (CD)
when I read Petteri's pontifications. Now I am further confused.

regards

Don from Down Under
"Roy" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
news:LBqoe.3006$(E-Mail Removed)...
> "RJ45" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
> news:(E-Mail Removed)...
>> HEllo,
>> I have a brand NEW Pentax *ist DS.
>> I Am satisfied of my camera.
>> but changing from lens to another lens I accidentally
>> made the internal mirror dirty with a dirt spot and it
>> was not dust.
>> I could clean it with a standard product to clean lenses and inside
>> camera mirror but it was VERY HARD I took a long time.. I used a very
>> very soft
>> cloth to do it.
>> IT can happen that the inside get dirty so here I want to make a
>> question.
>> Which is the proper way to clean the lenses and/or inside mirror of the
>> cameras ? with which tools ?
>> Can the internal mirror get damaged by products if using proper camera
>> products ?
>> Which is the best way to clean camera internals ?
>> thanks
>>
>> Rick
>>

>
> Hi there.
>
> The Reflex Mirror is different from almost any other mirror you are going
> to come across. The reflective surface is ON TOP of the Glass, not below
> it. It is incredibly easy to damage it.
>
> The normal rule is Do Not touch It with anything.
>
> If it gets very dusty, use a blower, without the brush. Dirt marks on the
> mirror are usually so out of focus that they will not affect your
> viewfinder image. If you must touch it, then a clean artists sable brush
> should be used, and used very gently.
>
> Point the lens opening downwards when changing lenses to avoid dirt
> getting inside.
>
> The best way to clean camera interiors, is with a miniature vacuum, (the
> kind that runs on 1 AA or the little 9V battery), without letting the end
> of the suction tube touch anything. The Shutter Blades are also very easy
> to damage, and replacing a shutter mechanism is expensive.
>
> Roy G
>



 
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JD
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      06-05-2005
"Don" <(E-Mail Removed)> a écrit dans le message de news:
sAzoe.3235$(E-Mail Removed)...
> Have a look at these sites:
>
> http://194.100.88.243/petteri/pont/H...ur_Sensor.html
> http://www.visibledust.com/
>
> Would be interested in other comments from the group once they have read
> the two/three articles about this. I was about to plunk out about $150
> (CD) when I read Petteri's pontifications. Now I am further confused.
>
> regards
>
> Don from Down Under





 
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JD
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      06-05-2005

"Don" <(E-Mail Removed)> a écrit dans le message de news:
sAzoe.3235$(E-Mail Removed)...
> Have a look at these sites:
>
> http://194.100.88.243/petteri/pont/H...ur_Sensor.html
> http://www.visibledust.com/
>
> Would be interested in other comments from the group once they have read
> the two/three articles about this. I was about to plunk out about $150
> (CD) when I read Petteri's pontifications. Now I am further confused.
>
> regards
>
> Don from Down Under


Sorry, I clicked on "send" instead of "paste"!...

Don, I've been through all this myself, and after much hesitation my
conclusions are:

1. Clean your camera yourself (you'll save money, it only takes 3 minutes -
photography is about taking photos for pleasure, not waiting for your camera
to be returned). Cleaning is something that has to be done do on a regular
basis and really, the only practical way is to do it yourself! It is nerves
breaking the first time, but frankly, there's nothing to it except that
legend and superstitions have already done their damage, together with
greedy salespeople to make you believe that only a professional can do it.
Not true if you have selected the appropriate tools.

2. My solution was to buy a kit (sensor swabs and pecpads with the
appropriate fluid). I think that next time I'll recycle the swabsticks by
wrapping them with pecpads - it will be cheaper (haven'd deciede yeet as my
supply of swabsticks is not exhausted).

3. For info, follow this link: I've use it successfully prior to cleaning
despite all the doom predicted to me.
http://fovea.perso.cegetel.net/IonizerE.htm (anything that removes stactic
electricity is a great idea, whether it is the method mentioned on the above
link or charging a brush - this is next on my list of things to try).

4. Use common sense: be gentle on your camera, use soft tools, don't scrub.
The sensor is protected either by a varnish or a glass plate. I have used
used compressed air successfully, though some people do not recommend it.
Again, be sensible about the way you blow the air... (don't shake the can,
hold it vertically, blow from a safe distance, in short bursts. Also, don't
be a purist about dust (a lot of people complain that their camera comes
back from cleaning with dust particles still on the sensor anyway).

My last word of advice: BE SENSIBLE AND PRAGMATIC. It it works, it is the
right way to do it, with all due respect to salesmen, purists, priests and
witches to name a few.

And above all, please keep us informed of your progress, we'll all benefit
from your acquired knowledge.

Jean (formerly from down under and missing it sometimes).


 
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SamSez
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      06-05-2005

"Don" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
news:sAzoe.3235$(E-Mail Removed)...
>Have a look at these sites:
>
>http://194.100.88.243/petteri/pont/H...rush_Your_Sens

or.html
>http://www.visibledust.com/
>
>Would be interested in other comments from the group once they have read the
>two/three articles about this. I was about to plunk out about $150 (CD)
>when I read Petteri's pontifications. Now I am further confused.
>
>regards


1) my first cleaning was a walk-in while-u-wait at a well known east coast US
repair-only shop that happens to be not far from where I live. It was done with
their shop-air and a sensor swab with eclipse. It was not 100% effective (to my
standards anyway), though it was a major improvement -- being the first cleaning
since owning the camera and many lens changes along.

2) I have since done cleanings myself with a foot-pump air supply, sensor swabs
and eclipse. I have easily gotten results as good or better than the shop,
though sensor swabs aren't exactly what I would call cheap. The foot pump still
bothers me too, as there is nothing to keep dust -- or the stray spider for that
matter! -- from being sucked in the inlet side and blasted against the mirror or
sensor. But I don't know that I have the kind of $$$ to put a shop air system
together of the quality of a dedicated repair shop.

3) after reading the first link above, I think you will see me at one or more
cosmetic counters today...

quite interesting.


 
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Jer
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      06-05-2005
SamSez wrote:

> 2) I have since done cleanings myself with a foot-pump air supply, sensor swabs
> and eclipse. I have easily gotten results as good or better than the shop,
> though sensor swabs aren't exactly what I would call cheap. The foot pump still
> bothers me too, as there is nothing to keep dust -- or the stray spider for that
> matter! -- from being sucked in the inlet side and blasted against the mirror or
> sensor. But I don't know that I have the kind of $$$ to put a shop air system
> together of the quality of a dedicated repair shop.



My little bench air supply (a recycled oil-free aquarium pump) lost it's
input filter, so I fashioned one from a piece of scrap aluminum window
screen, a large handful of replaceable cotton balls, a soup can, and a
dab or two of silicone caulking compound.

You sure there's not some place you could stuff a cotton ball or two?


--
jer
email reply - I am not a 'ten'
 
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Randy Berbaum
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      06-06-2005
SamSez <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:

: The foot pump still bothers me too, as there is nothing to keep dust --
: or the stray spider for that matter! -- from being sucked in the inlet
: side and blasted against the mirror or sensor. But I don't know that I
: have the kind of $$$ to put a shop air system together of the quality
: of a dedicated repair shop.

For a quick fix for this worry, put some filter material over this inlet.
Even some muslin cloth or other thin (lint free) cloth would help. Or you
could get a furnace filter and tear it apart for the filter material. A
piece big enough to cover (and slightly beyond) the inlet, taped securely
all around, would reduce the chance of any particulate or wildlife
contamination of the air supply. You can also purchase in line air filters
that can be installed in the output line if you are still nervous about
particulate contamination. It is highly recommended to keep the air
pressure as low as possible as at high enough pressures, even microscopic
particles can scratch or score sensitive surfaces. But if the PSI is kept
as low as possible it would take a rather hefty particle size (relatively)
to do damage.

This is why I have a multi level cleaning routine. First I use a hand held
squeeze bulb to get the easiest removed particles. If that does not get
it, a super soft brush may dislodge or remove additional pieces (followed
by another use of the bulb). Only if both of these methods fail would I
even think of trying chemicals or compressed air. Either has a potential
for harming the surface or even surrounding mechanicals. And some of this
can be additive in nature. So one use will not have an appreciable
detrimental effect, but 100 uses could cause noticable deterioration. So I
do everything I can to reduce the need for cleaning, then use the most
gentle cleaning possible to do the job. This should give me the longest
life expectancy possible for my equipment.

Randy

==========
Randy Berbaum
Champaign, IL

 
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