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Watermarking Kodak PhotoCD files

 
 
kodak@bluemail.ch
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      05-19-2005
Hi,

I have to give 100 shots (in Kodak PhotoCD-format)to a book
producer. And i want to be able to prove that I am the
owner of those pictures for the case, "somebody else"
will use them.
(Why in PCD-format? Because with no(?) other format so many
"slides" at such a high resolution can be stored on 1 CD
and because all necessary slides are already saved/scanned
to that format. The final page size of the book will be
148mm x 210mm).

Question:
Is there no way to add "watermarking-information" to
Kodak PhotoCD-files without corrupting the files?



Any tips and "alternate approaches" are apprechiated very
much. Thank you!

John

 
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Jeremy
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      05-21-2005

<(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
news:(E-Mail Removed) oups.com...
> Hi,
>
> I have to give 100 shots (in Kodak PhotoCD-format)to a book
> producer.> (Why in PCD-format? Because with no(?) other format so many
> "slides" at such a high resolution can be stored on 1 CD


I do not believe this is possible in PCD format, because end-user editing
software can only read, not write, in that proprietary format.

As I understand it, PCD was conceived as an archival format--essentially a
"digital negative." If the image files require any kind of editing, the
resulting file would have to be saved in a currently-available format. That
would probably be a TIF file at this point in time.



 
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ASAAR
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      05-21-2005
On 19 May 2005 07:19:05 -0700, http://www.velocityreviews.com/forums/(E-Mail Removed) wrote:

> I have to give 100 shots (in Kodak PhotoCD-format)to a book
> producer. And i want to be able to prove that I am the
> owner of those pictures for the case, "somebody else"
> will use them.
> (Why in PCD-format? Because with no(?) other format so many
> "slides" at such a high resolution can be stored on 1 CD
> and because all necessary slides are already saved/scanned
> to that format. The final page size of the book will be
> 148mm x 210mm).


That isn't true. The PCD format saves several resolutions, the
highest being 3072x2048, which is equivalent what is produced by a
6mp camera. Each PCD image is compressed, and the image files
usually range from 4.5 to about 5MB. Compare this to the JPG files
produced by a camera such as Canon's G6, which has a 7mp sensor.
One that I downloaded from a review web site was barely over 4MB in
size. The resolution of the JPG files produced by this camera will
be comparable to that of what standard PCD files can hold, and a CD
should be able to easily hold 100 of them. Probably more than 150.

Converting the images from PCD to another format (JPG, TIF, etc.)
may be undesirable, but it's not difficult at all, even if you do it
manually rather than automating the conversion. The tough, time
consuming, expensive part (scanning to create the Photo CD disks)
has already been done. You can choose to stick with PCD files to
avoid a little bit of extra effort, but then you probably won't be
able to give watermarked files to the book publisher.

 
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Ron Hunter
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      05-22-2005
Jeremy wrote:
> <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
> news:(E-Mail Removed) oups.com...
>
>>Hi,
>>
>>I have to give 100 shots (in Kodak PhotoCD-format)to a book
>>producer.> (Why in PCD-format? Because with no(?) other format so many
>>"slides" at such a high resolution can be stored on 1 CD

>
>
> I do not believe this is possible in PCD format, because end-user editing
> software can only read, not write, in that proprietary format.
>
> As I understand it, PCD was conceived as an archival format--essentially a
> "digital negative." If the image files require any kind of editing, the
> resulting file would have to be saved in a currently-available format. That
> would probably be a TIF file at this point in time.
>
>
>

More likely a PSD format, which is anything but small.


--
Ron Hunter (E-Mail Removed)
 
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Ronald Baird
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      05-26-2005
Greetings Jeremy,

You are right.

The original concept (about 198 of the service was to digitize the images
at the time of processing and deliver a Photo CD as an extra service. The
user then would play them back on their TV. Kodak made players and such to
do this. The idea was OK for a while but did not catch on - to early in the
digital world for most general consumers. Computers had not become that
popular just yet so the base for that media was not quite there. It was
popular with professionals, however, and it remained so for some time.

It was possible to have your slides or negatives scanned, and later up to
4x5 in format. Since the file could be opened in programs like Photoshop,
where it could be edited and improved, then saved as a TIFF, or other file
format, it did begin to become popular with professional photographers that
were getting into the digital world.

The is proprietary format and is created as s WORM - which relates to Refers
to electronic data storage in which the storage space on the optical disk
can be written on only once; that is, once the information is stored on the
disk, it cannot be edited (Write Once). However, the information on the disk
can be read as many times as desired (Read Many Times). I am not clear on
whether or not we included a digital watermark, but believe we did for some
time.

The service still exists in some reatailers and you can find more by going
to the noted Photo CD site.

http://www.kodak.com

Talk to you soon,

Ron Baird
Eastman Kodak Company




"Jeremy" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
news:TaKje.16582$E05.8310@trndny09...
>
> <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
> news:(E-Mail Removed) oups.com...
> > Hi,
> >
> > I have to give 100 shots (in Kodak PhotoCD-format)to a book
> > producer.> (Why in PCD-format? Because with no(?) other format so many
> > "slides" at such a high resolution can be stored on 1 CD

>
> I do not believe this is possible in PCD format, because end-user editing


> software can only read, not write, in that proprietary format.
>
> As I understand it, PCD was conceived as an archival format--essentially a
> "digital negative." If the image files require any kind of editing, the
> resulting file would have to be saved in a currently-available format.

That
> would probably be a TIF file at this point in time.
>
>
>



 
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Jeremy
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Posts: n/a
 
      05-26-2005

"Ronald Baird" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
news:d74la8$ej5$(E-Mail Removed)...
>
> The service still exists in some reatailers and you can find more by going
> to the noted Photo CD site.
>
> http://www.kodak.com
>
> Talk to you soon,
>
> Ron Baird
> Eastman Kodak Company
>



I don't have the URL at hand, but I saw something on the Kodak web site, in
the Professional category, that said the Photo CD was discontinued. Shall
we assume that those labs that still offer it will drop it once their
equipment becomes obsolete, or no more of those $10.00 Kodak CDs are
available to them?
>
>
>
> "Jeremy" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
> news:TaKje.16582$E05.8310@trndny09...
>>
>> <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
>> news:(E-Mail Removed) oups.com...
>> > Hi,
>> >
>> > I have to give 100 shots (in Kodak PhotoCD-format)to a book
>> > producer.> (Why in PCD-format? Because with no(?) other format so many
>> > "slides" at such a high resolution can be stored on 1 CD

>>
>> I do not believe this is possible in PCD format, because end-user editing

>
>> software can only read, not write, in that proprietary format.
>>
>> As I understand it, PCD was conceived as an archival format--essentially
>> a
>> "digital negative." If the image files require any kind of editing, the
>> resulting file would have to be saved in a currently-available format.

> That
>> would probably be a TIF file at this point in time.
>>
>>
>>

>
>



 
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Ronald Baird
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Posts: n/a
 
      06-01-2005
Hi Jeremy,

The home page for Photo CD has this statement on it.

"KODAK Photo CD hardware and software are discontinued. Photo CD-related
information and some software downloads remain available online for those
Kodak customers who wish to continue using their Photo CD products. However,
Kodak no longer services or supports this system."

Essentially, that Kodak is out of the loop on Photo CD equipment, although I
believe there are som labs that have the systems and software that can still
provide it if you like. Who they are can be found by searching the web. Try
the following.

http://www.twocardigital/kodakpcd.html
Ron Baird

Eastman Kodak Company




> You are right.
>
> The original concept (about 198 of the service was to digitize the

images
> at the time of processing and deliver a Photo CD as an extra service. The
> user then would play them back on their TV. Kodak made players and such to
> do this. The idea was OK for a while but did not catch on - to early in

the
> digital world for most general consumers. Computers had not become that
> popular just yet so the base for that media was not quite there. It was
> popular with professionals, however, and it remained so for some time.




 
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