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contrast and saturation in camera or software

 
 
mike regish
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      04-11-2005
Does it make any difference if I adjust the contrast and saturation in the
camera settings or with software afterwards? If I don't like the results
from camera settings, can they basically be reversed with software without
getting any artifacts?

TIA.

mike


 
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Steph
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      04-11-2005
If you have the choice, do it yourself. Once done within the camera, it
cannot be reversed and some tones will be lost forever. At least if you do
it yourself, you can keep the original file unedited.

That's why the output from semi-professional dslr looks rather dull and flat
compared to a popular "amateur" model - no enhancement.

"mike regish" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
news(E-Mail Removed)...
> Does it make any difference if I adjust the contrast and saturation in the
> camera settings or with software afterwards? If I don't like the results
> from camera settings, can they basically be reversed with software without
> getting any artifacts?
>
> TIA.
>
> mike
>



 
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Alan Browne
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      04-11-2005
mike regish wrote:

> Does it make any difference if I adjust the contrast and saturation in the
> camera settings or with software afterwards? If I don't like the results
> from camera settings, can they basically be reversed with software without
> getting any artifacts?


If you record RAW, then you can do whatever is needed after the fact.

I don't believe contrast and saturation are reversible, at least at the
extremes.

I believe sharpness is reversible if you know how the sharp algo in the
camera is set.

In any case, the monitors on the camera are far too small to do any
useful judgement of where these setting should be, IMO.

Cheers,
Alan

--
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Mark Lauter
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      04-11-2005
> If you have the choice, do it yourself. Once done within the camera, it
> cannot be reversed and some tones will be lost forever. At least if you

do
> it yourself, you can keep the original file unedited.


Exactly. Doing otherwise is like throwing the negative away after making
the first print.

--
Mark Lauter

Photos, Ideas & Opinions
http://www.marklauter.com


 
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Jim Townsend
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      04-11-2005
mike regish wrote:

> Does it make any difference if I adjust the contrast and saturation in the
> camera settings or with software afterwards? If I don't like the results
> from camera settings, can they basically be reversed with software without
> getting any artifacts?


I think if you like what the camera is doing when you boost these
parameters, then go with it. It will save you some editing time
later on.

To me, simple contrast adjustments aren't enough. Instead, I prefer
to adjust levels and curves. These are far more powerful tools.

I leave my camera settings in the neutral position and edit after
the fact.


 
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paul
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      04-12-2005
mike regish wrote:

> Does it make any difference if I adjust the contrast and saturation in the
> camera settings or with software afterwards? If I don't like the results
> from camera settings, can they basically be reversed with software without
> getting any artifacts?



No you cannot reverse these without loss of information but I believe it
is best to let the camera do the adjustments if they are the appropriate
adjustments because the camera should be using the raw data. If the
scene is already too saturated, too contrasty or too noisy for
sharpening, then it's better to turn that stuff off & do it yourself
because highlights will be blown irretrievably, colors posterized, etc.
I'm assuming RAW isn't an option for your camera or you don't have the
energy to go through that for all shots. If you had the option to shoot
RAW + high quality jpeg, you could probably ignore the RAW for most
shots & use the jpeg. I would definitely boost the settings in that case.
 
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John Francis
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      04-12-2005
In article <d3erdl$al4$(E-Mail Removed)>,
Alan Browne <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
>
>I believe sharpness is reversible if you know how the sharp algo in the
>camera is set.


Not true, in general.

Plus, of course, if you're taking processed output from the camera,
you've probably thrown away all the extra precision in the raw file.

 
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mike regish
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      04-12-2005
I have raw as well as raw plus jpeg. Basically I was wondering if I could
save tima at the computer by adjusting saturation and contrast in the
camera, but from the answers here I'll leave the settings neutral.

Thanks all.

mike

"paul" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
news:(E-Mail Removed)...
> mike regish wrote:
>
>> Does it make any difference if I adjust the contrast and saturation in
>> the camera settings or with software afterwards? If I don't like the
>> results from camera settings, can they basically be reversed with
>> software without getting any artifacts?

>
>
> No you cannot reverse these without loss of information but I believe it
> is best to let the camera do the adjustments if they are the appropriate
> adjustments because the camera should be using the raw data. If the scene
> is already too saturated, too contrasty or too noisy for sharpening, then
> it's better to turn that stuff off & do it yourself because highlights
> will be blown irretrievably, colors posterized, etc. I'm assuming RAW
> isn't an option for your camera or you don't have the energy to go through
> that for all shots. If you had the option to shoot RAW + high quality
> jpeg, you could probably ignore the RAW for most shots & use the jpeg. I
> would definitely boost the settings in that case.



 
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paul
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      04-12-2005
mike regish wrote:

> I have raw as well as raw plus jpeg.



Then yes you can save time for most images if you have enough memory
card capacity. If you have enough memory & not enough hard drive, delete
the RAW files for exposures that look fine.


> Basically I was wondering if I could
> save tima at the computer by adjusting saturation and contrast in the
> camera, but from the answers here I'll leave the settings neutral.
>
> Thanks all.
>
>
> "paul" wrote:
>
>>If you had the option to shoot RAW + high quality
>>jpeg, you could probably ignore the RAW for most shots & use the jpeg. I
>>would definitely boost the settings in that case.

 
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googlegroups@sensation.net.au
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      04-12-2005

mike regish wrote:
> I have raw as well as raw plus jpeg. Basically I was wondering if I

could
> save tima at the computer by adjusting saturation and contrast in the


> camera, but from the answers here I'll leave the settings neutral.


If you have the RAW file available then there's no need to keep the
settings neutral - the JPEG version will be saved by the camera as
configured (which may be irreversible), but the RAW version will simply
be tagged with those non default parameters. You can manually override
those settings on a per image basis in your conversion program.

So, configure your camera for the most aesthetically pleasing default
output, then if some images don't look 100% right you can play with the
settings before converting them from RAW...

This is speaking from a Canon perspective, other manufacturers may
differ.

 
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