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High resolution...through digital interpolation...

 
 
Des
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      04-05-2005
My camera takes photos in normal resolution but claims to be able to take
finer photos at a higher pixel-rate through "digital interpolation".
Surely that's just stretching the image and not worth doing?
Can't I improve the image to the same degree later using filters in Corel
Photopaint?

Is there any real advantage in terms of image quality between an image
that's been digitally interpolated to a higher resolution?
It's no substitute for a higher resolution CCD in the camera is it?

D.


 
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Larry
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      04-05-2005
In article <d2ugk2$psk$(E-Mail Removed)>,
http://www.velocityreviews.com/forums/(E-Mail Removed) says...
> My camera takes photos in normal resolution but claims to be able to take
> finer photos at a higher pixel-rate through "digital interpolation".
> Surely that's just stretching the image and not worth doing?
> Can't I improve the image to the same degree later using filters in Corel
> Photopaint?
>
> Is there any real advantage in terms of image quality between an image
> that's been digitally interpolated to a higher resolution?
> It's no substitute for a higher resolution CCD in the camera is it?
>
> D.
>
>
>


On some cameras the improvement is there but only slight, on others its just
an up-sizing that gives you a bigger picture, but not a better one.

Fuji makes several that "interpolate upward" and on the S7000 there is
USUALLY some improvement, but the file is twice as big, but NOT 2 times
better. (at any rate, doubling the pixels dosent double the quality anyway,
even if you increase the sensor count, twice as many isnt twice as good, only
twice as big).



--
Larry Lynch
Mystic, Ct.
 
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Bas v.d. Wiel
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      04-05-2005
On Tue, 05 Apr 2005 17:07:15 +0000, Des wrote:

> My camera takes photos in normal resolution but claims to be able to take
> finer photos at a higher pixel-rate through "digital interpolation".
> Surely that's just stretching the image and not worth doing?
> Can't I improve the image to the same degree later using filters in Corel
> Photopaint?
>
> Is there any real advantage in terms of image quality between an image
> that's been digitally interpolated to a higher resolution?
> It's no substitute for a higher resolution CCD in the camera is it?
>
> D.


There's a simple rule on processing information
(photo/video/audi) digitally:

garbage in = garbage out

It's as simple as that. Any pixel that was not produced by light hitting
the sensor and having its colour properly registered, is not a real pixel.
Sure it may be there, but it doesn't represent any visual information that
was present in the scene when the photo was taken. It was calculated after
the fact and therefore it is artificial.

There is absolutely nothing that a digital process can do after the
picture was taken to add real pixels. It is simply impossible. Now of
course there are plenty of sharpening tricks that create a pretty good
illusion of detail on interpolated images. They're nothing more than
illusions though and you can only go a certain length before the fact that
your pixels are fake starts showing. If the camera gives you all the
pixels it actually captured, then it is in no way capable of more than
good interpolating on your PC.. like Photopaint.

In practice you can usually interpolate up to 125% or even 150% of the
original size, apply a sharpening filter and end up with a decent print.
The result however is no substitute for a higher real resolution.

I see this a lot on really cheap desktop scanners. They claim to go up to
14400dpi while their optics start to struggle beyond 600dpi. Years ago I
bought a $3000,- flatbed scanner that had lesser specs than my neighbor's
$100 scanner, at least when we compared the boxes they came in. Turned out
that 'my' 1000dpi. was a lot sharper than 'his'. All the result of
interpolation and good optics.

Bas
 
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Mxsmanic
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      04-05-2005
Des writes:

> My camera takes photos in normal resolution but claims to be able to take
> finer photos at a higher pixel-rate through "digital interpolation".
> Surely that's just stretching the image and not worth doing?


Correct.

> Can't I improve the image to the same degree later using filters in Corel
> Photopaint?


You can't improve an image through any type of manipulation. You will
never have better quality than the image had when originally recorded.
Interpolation is the creation of an optical illusion; it does not
improve real image quality.

> Is there any real advantage in terms of image quality between an image
> that's been digitally interpolated to a higher resolution?


No.

> It's no substitute for a higher resolution CCD in the camera is it?


No, it's not.

--
Transpose hotmail and mxsmanic in my e-mail address to reach me directly.
 
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Mxsmanic
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      04-05-2005
Larry writes:

> On some cameras the improvement is there but only slight, on others its just
> an up-sizing that gives you a bigger picture, but not a better one.


There is never an improvement.

> Fuji makes several that "interpolate upward" and on the S7000 there is
> USUALLY some improvement ...


There is never any improvement. It's a mathematical impossibility.

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Ron Hunter
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      04-05-2005
Des wrote:
> My camera takes photos in normal resolution but claims to be able to take
> finer photos at a higher pixel-rate through "digital interpolation".
> Surely that's just stretching the image and not worth doing?
> Can't I improve the image to the same degree later using filters in Corel
> Photopaint?
>
> Is there any real advantage in terms of image quality between an image
> that's been digitally interpolated to a higher resolution?
> It's no substitute for a higher resolution CCD in the camera is it?
>
> D.
>
>

It is marketing, just like 'digital zoom'. Many 'enhanced digital
zooms' do basically the same thing, interpolating to a larger size, then
cropping.
It's mostly smoke and mirrors, but the pictures usually DO look
smoother, just not more detailed.


--
Ron Hunter (E-Mail Removed)
 
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Ron Hunter
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      04-05-2005
Mxsmanic wrote:
> Larry writes:
>
>
>>On some cameras the improvement is there but only slight, on others its just
>>an up-sizing that gives you a bigger picture, but not a better one.

>
>
> There is never an improvement.
>
>
>>Fuji makes several that "interpolate upward" and on the S7000 there is
>>USUALLY some improvement ...

>
>
> There is never any improvement. It's a mathematical impossibility.
>

There is an 'apparent' improvement, since 'jaggies' are artificially
reduced.

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Ron Hunter (E-Mail Removed)
 
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Ron Hunter
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      04-05-2005
Mxsmanic wrote:
> Des writes:
>
>
>>My camera takes photos in normal resolution but claims to be able to take
>>finer photos at a higher pixel-rate through "digital interpolation".
>>Surely that's just stretching the image and not worth doing?

>
>
> Correct.
>
>
>>Can't I improve the image to the same degree later using filters in Corel
>>Photopaint?

>
>
> You can't improve an image through any type of manipulation. You will
> never have better quality than the image had when originally recorded.
> Interpolation is the creation of an optical illusion; it does not
> improve real image quality.
>
>
>>Is there any real advantage in terms of image quality between an image
>>that's been digitally interpolated to a higher resolution?

>
>
> No.
>
>
>>It's no substitute for a higher resolution CCD in the camera is it?

>
>
> No, it's not.
>


Sigh.
Ok, let's start a firestorm here.
IF you have taken a picture at, say 4mp, and the picture has a lot of
sharp lines, some at angles to the horizon, then you CAN get a better
looking picture if you interpolate to a larger size, but ONLY because
the interpolation algorithm is able to insert pictures that are the same
as what would have been captured by a higher resolution sensor. They
aren't 'real', but they end up in the same place as a real one would be,
so the difference is rather more theoretical than practical.

That said, the utility of this kind of interpolation is limited, and
will rarely give you noticeably better results than just processing the
picture with Photoshop.


--
Ron Hunter (E-Mail Removed)
 
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Larry
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      04-05-2005
In article <(E-Mail Removed)>, (E-Mail Removed)
says...
> Larry writes:
>
> > On some cameras the improvement is there but only slight, on others its just
> > an up-sizing that gives you a bigger picture, but not a better one.

>
> There is never an improvement.
>
> > Fuji makes several that "interpolate upward" and on the S7000 there is
> > USUALLY some improvement ...

>
> There is never any improvement. It's a mathematical impossibility.
>
>



Well its wonderful that you know everything there is to know about a camera
you dont own, havent tried, and dont know **** about.

There is SOMETIMES, an aparent increse in picture detail with the Fuji S7000.
Does it make a 12mp image YES! Does it have 12mp of resolution? NO! Does it
sometimes improve the aparent resolution? YES! Even some reviewers say that
SOMETIMES it works, however, nobody that I've read recommends it, and niether
do I, so whats your problem????? Fuji sells it as a 6mp Camera (Thats what it
says on the box it came in.

Personally, I use it in 6mp mode, and used that way it takes good pictures.

Sometimes though, when Im shooting RAW with it, I let the software do it both
ways, then use the picture that looks better, and SOMETIMES the interpolated
image looks better.




--
Larry Lynch
Mystic, Ct.
 
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Tony
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      04-05-2005
It is advertising bull. There is no such thing.

--
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home of The Camera-ist's Manifesto
The Improved Links Pages are at
http://www.chapelhillnoir.com/links/mlinks00.html
A sample chapter from "Haight-Ashbury" is at
http://www.chapelhillnoir.com/writ/hait/hatitl.html

"Des" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
news:d2ugk2$psk$(E-Mail Removed)...
> My camera takes photos in normal resolution but claims to be able to take
> finer photos at a higher pixel-rate through "digital interpolation".
> Surely that's just stretching the image and not worth doing?
> Can't I improve the image to the same degree later using filters in Corel
> Photopaint?
>
> Is there any real advantage in terms of image quality between an image
> that's been digitally interpolated to a higher resolution?
> It's no substitute for a higher resolution CCD in the camera is it?
>
> D.
>
>



 
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