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Jagged & wavy lines on pictures

 
 
Buckwheat
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      03-10-2005
I don't know if I am in the right group,but maybe there is someone
that can help me or lead me the right way.

When I take shots of houses,fence lines, The roof lines are jagged
and wavy, and it makes
the printed photo looks bad, is there a solution to this problem, or am
I doing sometning wrong.
any advice or help will be appreciated, either reply by post or
E-Mail me at http://www.velocityreviews.com/forums/(E-Mail Removed)
Thank You.. Buckwheat..


 
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Scott W
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      03-10-2005

Buckwheat wrote:
> I don't know if I am in the right group,but maybe there is someone
> that can help me or lead me the right way.
>
> When I take shots of houses,fence lines, The roof lines are

jagged
> and wavy, and it makes
> the printed photo looks bad, is there a solution to this problem, or

am
> I doing sometning wrong.
> any advice or help will be appreciated, either reply by post or
> E-Mail me at (E-Mail Removed)
> Thank You.. Buckwheat..

Could you give a bit more detail, what FL lens you were using perhaps.
The best would be is you could post a link to one of these photos.

I will take a guess that it might be thermals that you are seeing, if
you are shooting with a long lens the thermal air currents will often
distort the image making it look wavy.

Scott

 
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Gary Edstrom
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      03-10-2005
Note: Courtesy copy of this followup sent to author via email.

On Wed, 9 Mar 2005 21:40:22 -0600, (E-Mail Removed) (Buckwheat) wrote:

> I don't know if I am in the right group,but maybe there is someone
>that can help me or lead me the right way.
>
> When I take shots of houses,fence lines, The roof lines are jagged
>and wavy, and it makes
> the printed photo looks bad, is there a solution to this problem, or am
>I doing sometning wrong.
> any advice or help will be appreciated, either reply by post or
>E-Mail me at (E-Mail Removed)
> Thank You.. Buckwheat..


It sounds like you might be talking about a moire pattern. It happens
with digital cameras when you are taking a picture of something with a
lot of parallel straight lines. You can also see it on television if
someone is wearing a coat with a checkerboard pattern.

This is one of those places where film wins out over digital. The
random placements of the chemical salts just don't produce the patterns.
Some photo processing programs may have the capability of reducing the
effect.

Gary

--
Gary Edstrom <(E-Mail Removed)>
Visit my Midway Island home page at http://gbe.dynip.com/Midway
Artificial Intelligence: Making computers behave like they do
in the movies.
The above tagline is number 44 in a series of 547. Collect them all!
 
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Keith Sheppard
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      03-10-2005
>>It sounds like you might be talking about a moire pattern.

Slightly off topic, but only just... I recently tried to scan an old
pamphlet containing a number of black and white photos. Every single photo
has come out stripey. My scanner software has some setting to do with moire
reduction. I tried this and it made an almost imperceptible improvement but
the pictures were still basically striped. Any suggestions how I can
overcome this?

Keith



 
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andrew29@littlepinkcloud.invalid
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      03-10-2005
Keith Sheppard <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
>>>It sounds like you might be talking about a moire pattern.


> Slightly off topic, but only just... I recently tried to scan an old
> pamphlet containing a number of black and white photos. Every single photo
> has come out stripey. My scanner software has some setting to do with moire
> reduction. I tried this and it made an almost imperceptible improvement but
> the pictures were still basically striped. Any suggestions how I can
> overcome this?


The screen pattern in your document is aliasing with the scanning
frequency. The classic way to fix this is oversampling, which
involves scanning at the highest resolution followed by downsampling.
Another possibility is to defocus slightly.

Andrew.
 
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andrew29@littlepinkcloud.invalid
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      03-10-2005
Buckwheat <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:

> --WebTV-Mail-32174-1845
> Content-Type: Text/Plain; Charset=US-ASCII
> Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7Bit


> I don't know if I am in the right group,but maybe there is
> someone that can help me or lead me the right way. When I take
> shots of houses,fence lines, The roof lines are jagged and wavy, and
> it makes the printed photo looks bad, is there a solution to this
> problem, or am I doing sometning wrong. any advice or help will be
> appreciated, either reply by post or E-Mail me at (E-Mail Removed)


This is aliasing. If your print is less than 300 pixels per inch
(based on the resolution of the actual picture) you may see this quite
dramatically. One way to reduce the visual impact of this effect is
to resize the image to the actaul physical resolution of your printer.
This is usually 360ppi for the Epsons.

Andrew.
 
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JPS@no.komm
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      03-10-2005
In message <(E-Mail Removed)>,
(E-Mail Removed)lid wrote:

>Keith Sheppard <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
>>>>It sounds like you might be talking about a moire pattern.

>
>> Slightly off topic, but only just... I recently tried to scan an old
>> pamphlet containing a number of black and white photos. Every single photo
>> has come out stripey. My scanner software has some setting to do with moire
>> reduction. I tried this and it made an almost imperceptible improvement but
>> the pictures were still basically striped. Any suggestions how I can
>> overcome this?

>
>The screen pattern in your document is aliasing with the scanning
>frequency. The classic way to fix this is oversampling, which
>involves scanning at the highest resolution followed by downsampling.
>Another possibility is to defocus slightly.


I wonder if anyone makes film to put betwen the printed images and the
scanner, that breaks up the patterns?

What I would do is sample at the highest optical resolution, then use
the "diffuse" filter to randomly swap neighboring pixels, zoomed in
300%, repeatedly until the pattern is gone. Then downsample (optionally
noise-filtering, first).
--

<>>< ><<> ><<> <>>< ><<> <>>< <>>< ><<>
John P Sheehy <(E-Mail Removed)>
><<> <>>< <>>< ><<> <>>< ><<> ><<> <>><

 
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Bubbabob
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      03-10-2005
"Keith Sheppard" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:

>>>It sounds like you might be talking about a moire pattern.

>
> Slightly off topic, but only just... I recently tried to scan an old
> pamphlet containing a number of black and white photos. Every single
> photo has come out stripey. My scanner software has some setting to
> do with moire reduction. I tried this and it made an almost
> imperceptible improvement but the pictures were still basically
> striped. Any suggestions how I can overcome this?
>
> Keith
>
>
>
>


Send your scanner back for an overhaul.
 
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