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Do you use CD or DVD for archiving?

 
 
Laser Faire
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      02-24-2005
Do you archive your images on CD-R, CD-RW, DVD-/+R, or DVD-+RW? Why?
Which is better? Which is likely to last longer before rotting? Or
are there other problems that can arise.

My 30 year old negatives can still be printed. Will I be able to
retrieve my digital images in 30 years?


 
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Jim Waggener
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      02-24-2005

"Laser Faire" <moc.seimmud4latigid@eriafresal> wrote in message
news(E-Mail Removed)...
> Do you archive your images on CD-R, CD-RW, DVD-/+R, or DVD-+RW? Why?
> Which is better? Which is likely to last longer before rotting? Or
> are there other problems that can arise.
>
> My 30 year old negatives can still be printed. Will I be able to
> retrieve my digital images in 30 years?
>

I personally use DVD, larger space = more images, and I burn two copies. As
far as newer technology you are just going to have to migrate from your
current storage method to the newer. You are in affect transferring digital
images time and time again. Whether this loses data from the original I do
not know. You can also have your digital images transferred to film.

Jim



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Scott W
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      02-24-2005

Laser Faire wrote:
> Do you archive your images on CD-R, CD-RW, DVD-/+R, or DVD-+RW? Why?
> Which is better? Which is likely to last longer before rotting? Or
> are there other problems that can arise.
>
> My 30 year old negatives can still be printed. Will I be able to
> retrieve my digital images in 30 years?


I am using DVDs, the writing surface of a DVD is buried inside the disk
and so less likely to have problem then a CD where the writing surface
is right at the top. Things are not going obsolete as fast as many
people would have you believe, file formats from years ago, like gif,
still work today. Jpeg will be around for a long, long time. You might
have to move you files to newer media from time to time and you should
definitely have more then one copy as any DVD or CD can fail over time.

Scott

 
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Alfred Molon
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      02-25-2005
In article <(E-Mail Removed)>, Laser Faire
says...
> Do you archive your images on CD-R, CD-RW, DVD-/+R, or DVD-+RW? Why?
> Which is better? Which is likely to last longer before rotting? Or
> are there other problems that can arise.
>
> My 30 year old negatives can still be printed. Will I be able to
> retrieve my digital images in 30 years?


DVDs, because on CDs there is just not enough space for RAW files.
--

Alfred Molon
------------------------------
Olympus 4040, 5050, 5060, 7070, 8080, E300 forum at
http://groups.yahoo.com/group/MyOlympus/
Olympus 8080 resource - http://myolympus.org/8080/
 
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Keith Sheppard
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      02-25-2005
>>You are in affect transferring digital
>>images time and time again. Whether this loses data from the original I do
>>not know.

Only if there is a severe hardware error causing bits to be lost. In
theory, every copy should be identical to the original.

I think the probability of harware-introduced errors is vanishingly small
but a single instance could be catastrophic. If you are of a paranoid
disposition it might be a good idea just to check you can still view the
images after each transfer.

Keith


 
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Ron
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      02-25-2005
I used cd's for many years and am now using dvd's. My rule of thumb is
to make two copies -- one for the house and one for storage outside the
house (in the trunk of my car usually) and every couple of years make
sure that everything is backed onto new media, putting the old ones in
the back of a filing cabinet. Of course, I keep everything on my
computers, with one backup on a second hard drive.

FYI, my discs from the mid-90s still read perfectly.
Who knows what will be around 30 years from now (though you will
certainly be able to retrieve your images), but I do have a very
unhappy memory of all our family's old photos being lost in a very
unexpected flood. No backups in those days.

My next long term solution will be to put a laptop sized hard drive in
a small USB enclosure and use it as my main 'outside the house' backup
for images and other important files. This solution is now very, very
inexpensive.

 
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Larry
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      02-25-2005
In article <(E-Mail Removed) .com>,
http://www.velocityreviews.com/forums/(E-Mail Removed) says...
> I used cd's for many years and am now using dvd's. My rule of thumb is
> to make two copies -- one for the house and one for storage outside the
> house (in the trunk of my car usually) and every couple of years make
> sure that everything is backed onto new media, putting the old ones in
> the back of a filing cabinet. Of course, I keep everything on my
> computers, with one backup on a second hard drive.
>
> FYI, my discs from the mid-90s still read perfectly.
> Who knows what will be around 30 years from now (though you will
> certainly be able to retrieve your images), but I do have a very
> unhappy memory of all our family's old photos being lost in a very
> unexpected flood. No backups in those days.
>
> My next long term solution will be to put a laptop sized hard drive in
> a small USB enclosure and use it as my main 'outside the house' backup
> for images and other important files. This solution is now very, very
> inexpensive.
>
>


I'm using DvDs now, but since the very first cd writers became available I
was using CDRs.

I have found the price difference betweer DvD-r and CDr to have dissapeared
with hundred packs of blank write-once DVDs down between $20 and $30 (US)
most of the time, so there is no economy in using CDRs.

I do, however, avoid any re-writable medium for archiving anything.

I can still read the original 1x discs I wrote with my first old 1x burner.

I have NEVER had a re-writable cd last more than a couple of months, so I
gave up on them early on.

Re-writable DvDs dont seem to have the same problems as re-writable cdrs but
since the cost for them is high, I use them only for storage of recoded
video, and only for short term storage... (saving Mondays CSI-Miami 'till I
have time to watch it, ect)


--
Larry Lynch
Mystic, Ct.
 
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Ron
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      02-25-2005
Hi Larry:

Strange, but I used re-writable cd's for years with Direct CD as my
primary backup and to this day they all read and write perfectly, and
this after hundreds of rewrites in some cases. Maybe I lost one or two
along the way, but I must say that they have been perfectly reliable
regardless of brand and three generations of burners. I do use dvd-rw's
as part of my current backup scheme, but since I've only been doing it a
short time I have no idea of their reliability. I do agree that for
permanent long term archiving cdr's or dvd r's would be the way to go.
But my archiving is pretty 'short term'. The important thing is not to
be driven nuts by this.

/ron

Larry wrote:
> In article <(E-Mail Removed) .com>,
> (E-Mail Removed) says...
>
>>I used cd's for many years and am now using dvd's. My rule of thumb is
>>to make two copies -- one for the house and one for storage outside the
>>house (in the trunk of my car usually) and every couple of years make
>>sure that everything is backed onto new media, putting the old ones in
>>the back of a filing cabinet. Of course, I keep everything on my
>>computers, with one backup on a second hard drive.
>>
>>FYI, my discs from the mid-90s still read perfectly.
>>Who knows what will be around 30 years from now (though you will
>>certainly be able to retrieve your images), but I do have a very
>>unhappy memory of all our family's old photos being lost in a very
>>unexpected flood. No backups in those days.
>>
>>My next long term solution will be to put a laptop sized hard drive in
>>a small USB enclosure and use it as my main 'outside the house' backup
>>for images and other important files. This solution is now very, very
>>inexpensive.
>>
>>

>
>
> I'm using DvDs now, but since the very first cd writers became available I
> was using CDRs.
>
> I have found the price difference betweer DvD-r and CDr to have dissapeared
> with hundred packs of blank write-once DVDs down between $20 and $30 (US)
> most of the time, so there is no economy in using CDRs.
>
> I do, however, avoid any re-writable medium for archiving anything.
>
> I can still read the original 1x discs I wrote with my first old 1x burner.
>
> I have NEVER had a re-writable cd last more than a couple of months, so I
> gave up on them early on.
>
> Re-writable DvDs dont seem to have the same problems as re-writable cdrs but
> since the cost for them is high, I use them only for storage of recoded
> video, and only for short term storage... (saving Mondays CSI-Miami 'till I
> have time to watch it, ect)
>
>


 
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Dave Herzstein
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      02-25-2005
Ron wrote:
>
> I used cd's for many years and am now using dvd's. My rule of thumb is
> to make two copies -- one for the house and one for storage outside the
> house (in the trunk of my car usually)....


You car trunk is a very bad place to store DVDs. The temperature
cycling could cause expansion/contraction induced delamination and
summertime high tempertures would (at least) accelerate aging.

-Dave
 
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All Things Mopar
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      02-25-2005
Ron commented courteously ...

> I used cd's for many years and am now using dvd's.


Ron and Larry...

I've been using CD-Rs successfully for years. I have a
drive that can read DVDs but not burn them.

Why did you switch to DVD-R, other than the obvious very
high capacity? Is it because you need the capacity for
very large files, ala RAW, or large files because of very
high resolution?

Not thinking that I need RAW (yet) for the work I do, not
needing to re-edit previously saved images, and not
needing to save in the native format of PSP 8/9 (where
pspimage files can get quite large), I've been well-
served with JPEGs, where I get very acceptable quality by
keeping compression quite low.

Since I'm always trying to learn, I'm interested in your
perspectives on DVD vs. CD. Thanks.

--
ATM, aka Jerry
 
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