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20D and dust spots

 
 
Lester Wareham
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Posts: n/a
 
      12-31-2004
Dust seems to be a problem.

I noticed a piece of fluff on the viewfinder today. Rather than let it
migrate to the sensor I *think* I managed to remove it.

This prompted me to try the sensor dust test (stop down to f22 and shoot the
sky out of focus. Sure enough there are a couple of faint spots, so I guess
changing from film to digital won't mean I will be giving up using the clone
stamp any time soon.

What I find disturbing is this is a brand new camera for xmas, I only have
one EF lens which has been mounted exactly twice, once on delivery and once
on xmas day. The camera has only been used in doors apart from a short stint
(mostly because I have been fixing my central heating).

If this is the amount of dust intrusion at this point what are things going
to be like after changing lenses in windy conditions a few times?

I know the 20D is not a pro camera so I was not expecting the mount to be
dust proof, but this seems to be an issue. Is this a particular problem with
the cheap 18-55mm kit lens or can I expect the same problem with any lenses?

I was planning to get mostly prime lenses like my old system but now I
wonder if I should consider zooms just to reduce the number of lens
mountings....

Can some of the more experienced DSLR users please indicate how much of an
operational issue sensor dust is and what precautions they take.

cheers

Lester



 
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Malcolm Stewart
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Posts: n/a
 
      12-31-2004
"Lester Wareham" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
news:41d55339$0$21322$(E-Mail Removed)...
> Dust seems to be a problem.
>
> I noticed a piece of fluff on the viewfinder today. Rather than let it
> migrate to the sensor I *think* I managed to remove it.
>
> This prompted me to try the sensor dust test (stop down to f22 and shoot

the
> sky out of focus. Sure enough there are a couple of faint spots, so I

guess
> changing from film to digital won't mean I will be giving up using the

clone
> stamp any time soon.


I've had a 10D for nearly 2 years, and it's been in amateur use and has
taken >5000 images. I also mainly use prime lenses. If I stop down to f22,
I too can see dust spots. BUT, why do I mainly use prime lenses ? So that
I can use f2.8, f4 and f5.6 and still get sharp images; and at f1.4 as well.
Stop worrying, and get out taking some photos!
--
M Stewart
Milton Keynes, UK
http://www.megalith.freeserve.co.uk/oddimage.htm



 
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Lester Wareham
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Posts: n/a
 
      12-31-2004

>
> I've had a 10D for nearly 2 years, and it's been in amateur use and has
> taken >5000 images. I also mainly use prime lenses. If I stop down to
> f22,
> I too can see dust spots. BUT, why do I mainly use prime lenses ? So
> that
> I can use f2.8, f4 and f5.6 and still get sharp images; and at f1.4 as
> well.
> Stop worrying, and get out taking some photos!
> --
> M Stewart
> Milton Keynes, UK
> http://www.megalith.freeserve.co.uk/oddimage.htm
>
>
>


Thanks for the confidence boost, but is the 10D better sealed or are you
lucky?

I guess there is an issue of finding a problem if one looks for it on my
part, the dust motes are barely detectable at f8 and then probably not at
all except on an even tone.

The other reason for avoiding zooms are the weight and size, particularly
for the Canon f2.8L flavours. On my old FD system I did have a 70-210/f4,
but it was so cumbersome I almost never used it.

thanks


Lester



 
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Joseph Meehan
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Posts: n/a
 
      12-31-2004
Lester Wareham wrote:
>> I've had a 10D for nearly 2 years, and it's been in amateur use and
>> has taken >5000 images. I also mainly use prime lenses. If I stop
>> down to f22,
>> I too can see dust spots. BUT, why do I mainly use prime lenses ? So
>> that
>> I can use f2.8, f4 and f5.6 and still get sharp images; and at f1.4
>> as well.
>> Stop worrying, and get out taking some photos!
>> --
>> M Stewart
>> Milton Keynes, UK
>> http://www.megalith.freeserve.co.uk/oddimage.htm
>>
>>
>>

>
> Thanks for the confidence boost, but is the 10D better sealed or are
> you lucky?


I don't think you are getting much dust in with the lens on, although
zoom lenses may have a chance of creating a problem, I have not seen in in
my 20D, as of yet. I admit I am more careful changing lenses than I was
with my non-digital SLRs. Still I have changed lenses in the rain and not
had a problem.

>
> I guess there is an issue of finding a problem if one looks for it
> on my part, the dust motes are barely detectable at f8 and then
> probably not at all except on an even tone.
>
> The other reason for avoiding zooms are the weight and size,
> particularly for the Canon f2.8L flavours. On my old FD system I did
> have a 70-210/f4, but it was so cumbersome I almost never used it.
>
> thanks
>
>
> Lester


--
Joseph Meehan

26 + 6 = 1 It's Irish Math


 
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Musty
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      12-31-2004

"Lester Wareham" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
news:41d55339$0$21322$(E-Mail Removed)...
> Dust seems to be a problem.
>
> I noticed a piece of fluff on the viewfinder today. Rather than let it
> migrate to the sensor I *think* I managed to remove it.
>
> This prompted me to try the sensor dust test (stop down to f22 and shoot

the
> sky out of focus. Sure enough there are a couple of faint spots, so I

guess
> changing from film to digital won't mean I will be giving up using the

clone
> stamp any time soon.
>
> What I find disturbing is this is a brand new camera for xmas, I only have
> one EF lens which has been mounted exactly twice, once on delivery and

once
> on xmas day. The camera has only been used in doors apart from a short

stint
> (mostly because I have been fixing my central heating).
>
> If this is the amount of dust intrusion at this point what are things

going
> to be like after changing lenses in windy conditions a few times?
>
> I know the 20D is not a pro camera so I was not expecting the mount to be
> dust proof, but this seems to be an issue. Is this a particular problem

with
> the cheap 18-55mm kit lens or can I expect the same problem with any

lenses?
>
> I was planning to get mostly prime lenses like my old system but now I
> wonder if I should consider zooms just to reduce the number of lens
> mountings....
>
> Can some of the more experienced DSLR users please indicate how much of an
> operational issue sensor dust is and what precautions they take.
>
> cheers
>
> Lester
>


Lester, please see my posts in rec.photo.digital.slr-systems. The thread is
titled "sensor cleaning".

I am also fairly new to the 20D and saw about 10-15 dust spots @ f/22
straight out of the box essentially. Initially I was very upset about this
(being new to DSLR also) and it made me very uncomfortable. I did quite a
bit of research and this is totally not uncommon. I tried the rocket air
bulb blower yesterday and it removed all my dust-spots. I did not resort to
physically touching the sensor. Note that I had my significant other hold a
vacuum in the proximity of the camera while I used the blower (but I am not
sure if this is really necessary).

Here is a link to the rocket blower:
http://www.bhphotovideo.com/bnh/cont...=259157&is=REG

Here are some other cleaning methods/links **try at own risk!!**:
http://www.photo.net/equipment/digital/sensorcleaning/
http://www.pbase.com/copperhill/ccd_cleaning
http://www.luminous-landscape.com/es...cleaning.shtml

After reading all the physical cleaning methods, I was very happy that the
blower worked for me. Those C02 blowers look very good too.

Hope this helps
Musty.


 
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C J Campbell
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      12-31-2004

"Lester Wareham" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
news:41d55339$0$21322$(E-Mail Removed)...
> Dust seems to be a problem.


Yes, it is. It is a problem common to all dSLRs. The spots mainly show up
against large expanses of sky or some light colored area. They get lost in
background clutter otherwise. It is the main reason I hesitated for so long
before getting a dSLR.

There is no way to keep dust out of the camera. The major source of dust
indoors is people -- everyone lives inside of a dust cloud, shedding an
aerosol of bits of skin and hair and particles of clothing and mites and
stuff out of every conceivable opening everywhere they go. Thankfully, we
don't think about it much, but it affects our photography. No matter what
you do, some of that is going to get into the camera. It is probably cleaner
to change your camera outdoors on a windy day.

Clean your sensor regularly, using a dry bulb to blow particles off the
chip. If something is really stubborn, a cotton swab and denatured alcohol
will work. If it does not come off with that, a trip to the repair shop is
in order.

Some manufacturers have a disclaimer saying that you should never try to
clean the chip. Nikon does this on cameras sold in the US, but then turns
around and sells a do it yourself cleaning kit in Japan. Maybe they think
American fingers are too big (thinking of the film "Crazy People") to do a
good job. Anyway, all the kit contains is a blower bulb, some swabs, and
some denatured alcohol. It tells you to run the very lightly moistened swabs
in swirls over the sensor. Be gentle; it should not take any pressure to
remove even stubborn dust. You are unlikely to scratch the sensor with a
swab, but I suspect you could knock it out of alignment. You don't want to
use enough fluid that it might leave a stain.

Canned air contains freezing cold fluids that can drip onto the sensor, so
most people avoid it. Even if it is certified as fluid free, it is under
enough pressure that when released it can cause moisture to condense out of
the air and form ice on the sensor. Whenever you run air through a narrow
passage to accelerate it the pressure is reduced, meaning it can hold less
water and the temperature is also reduced, which also lowers how much water
the air can contain and which means that any water that condenses out will
be cold. It is the reason that canned air and propane tanks and the like, if
run continuously, will sometimes clog up with ice at the valves.


 
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embee
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      12-31-2004
On Fri, 31 Dec 2004 13:25:18 -0000, "Lester Wareham"
<(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:

>Dust seems to be a problem.
>
>I noticed a piece of fluff on the viewfinder today. Rather than let it
>migrate to the sensor I *think* I managed to remove it.
>
>This prompted me to try the sensor dust test (stop down to f22 and shoot the
>sky out of focus. Sure enough there are a couple of faint spots, so I guess
>changing from film to digital won't mean I will be giving up using the clone
>stamp any time soon.
>
>What I find disturbing is this is a brand new camera for xmas, I only have
>one EF lens which has been mounted exactly twice, once on delivery and once
>on xmas day. The camera has only been used in doors apart from a short stint
>(mostly because I have been fixing my central heating).
>
>If this is the amount of dust intrusion at this point what are things going
>to be like after changing lenses in windy conditions a few times?
>
>I know the 20D is not a pro camera so I was not expecting the mount to be
>dust proof, but this seems to be an issue. Is this a particular problem with
>the cheap 18-55mm kit lens or can I expect the same problem with any lenses?
>
>I was planning to get mostly prime lenses like my old system but now I
>wonder if I should consider zooms just to reduce the number of lens
>mountings....
>
>Can some of the more experienced DSLR users please indicate how much of an
>operational issue sensor dust is and what precautions they take.
>
>cheers
>
>Lester
>

You think you've got problems )
http://www.flickr.com/photos/mikeb1/

 
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Lester Wareham
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      12-31-2004
Anyone know of a UK supplier for "Sensor Swabs" and "Eclipse Optic Cleaner"
for sensor cleaning?

"Musty" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
news:VteBd.34850$(E-Mail Removed)...
>
> "Lester Wareham" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
> news:41d55339$0$21322$(E-Mail Removed)...
>> Dust seems to be a problem.
>>
>> I noticed a piece of fluff on the viewfinder today. Rather than let it
>> migrate to the sensor I *think* I managed to remove it.
>>
>> This prompted me to try the sensor dust test (stop down to f22 and shoot

> the
>> sky out of focus. Sure enough there are a couple of faint spots, so I

> guess
>> changing from film to digital won't mean I will be giving up using the

> clone
>> stamp any time soon.
>>
>> What I find disturbing is this is a brand new camera for xmas, I only
>> have
>> one EF lens which has been mounted exactly twice, once on delivery and

> once
>> on xmas day. The camera has only been used in doors apart from a short

> stint
>> (mostly because I have been fixing my central heating).
>>
>> If this is the amount of dust intrusion at this point what are things

> going
>> to be like after changing lenses in windy conditions a few times?
>>
>> I know the 20D is not a pro camera so I was not expecting the mount to be
>> dust proof, but this seems to be an issue. Is this a particular problem

> with
>> the cheap 18-55mm kit lens or can I expect the same problem with any

> lenses?
>>
>> I was planning to get mostly prime lenses like my old system but now I
>> wonder if I should consider zooms just to reduce the number of lens
>> mountings....
>>
>> Can some of the more experienced DSLR users please indicate how much of
>> an
>> operational issue sensor dust is and what precautions they take.
>>
>> cheers
>>
>> Lester
>>

>
> Lester, please see my posts in rec.photo.digital.slr-systems. The thread
> is
> titled "sensor cleaning".
>
> I am also fairly new to the 20D and saw about 10-15 dust spots @ f/22
> straight out of the box essentially. Initially I was very upset about this
> (being new to DSLR also) and it made me very uncomfortable. I did quite a
> bit of research and this is totally not uncommon. I tried the rocket air
> bulb blower yesterday and it removed all my dust-spots. I did not resort
> to
> physically touching the sensor. Note that I had my significant other hold
> a
> vacuum in the proximity of the camera while I used the blower (but I am
> not
> sure if this is really necessary).
>
> Here is a link to the rocket blower:
> http://www.bhphotovideo.com/bnh/cont...=259157&is=REG
>
> Here are some other cleaning methods/links **try at own risk!!**:
> http://www.photo.net/equipment/digital/sensorcleaning/
> http://www.pbase.com/copperhill/ccd_cleaning
> http://www.luminous-landscape.com/es...cleaning.shtml
>
> After reading all the physical cleaning methods, I was very happy that the
> blower worked for me. Those C02 blowers look very good too.
>
> Hope this helps
> Musty.
>
>



 
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Musty
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      12-31-2004

"Lester Wareham" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
news:41d5918e$0$21317$(E-Mail Removed)...
> Anyone know of a UK supplier for "Sensor Swabs" and "Eclipse Optic

Cleaner"
> for sensor cleaning?
>


I would really try a bulb blower first. I think a lot of the sites which
strongly advocate using direct contact cleaning methods are trying to sell
it to you. There was a poster in the thread which I mentioned that said he
had been using a bulb blower on DSLR for 3 years with success. It worked for
me on a 20D. Direct cleaning should be a last resort only.

> "Musty" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
> news:VteBd.34850$(E-Mail Removed)...
> >
> > "Lester Wareham" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
> > news:41d55339$0$21322$(E-Mail Removed)...
> >> Dust seems to be a problem.
> >>
> >> I noticed a piece of fluff on the viewfinder today. Rather than let it
> >> migrate to the sensor I *think* I managed to remove it.
> >>
> >> This prompted me to try the sensor dust test (stop down to f22 and

shoot
> > the
> >> sky out of focus. Sure enough there are a couple of faint spots, so I

> > guess
> >> changing from film to digital won't mean I will be giving up using the

> > clone
> >> stamp any time soon.
> >>
> >> What I find disturbing is this is a brand new camera for xmas, I only
> >> have
> >> one EF lens which has been mounted exactly twice, once on delivery and

> > once
> >> on xmas day. The camera has only been used in doors apart from a short

> > stint
> >> (mostly because I have been fixing my central heating).
> >>
> >> If this is the amount of dust intrusion at this point what are things

> > going
> >> to be like after changing lenses in windy conditions a few times?
> >>
> >> I know the 20D is not a pro camera so I was not expecting the mount to

be
> >> dust proof, but this seems to be an issue. Is this a particular problem

> > with
> >> the cheap 18-55mm kit lens or can I expect the same problem with any

> > lenses?
> >>
> >> I was planning to get mostly prime lenses like my old system but now I
> >> wonder if I should consider zooms just to reduce the number of lens
> >> mountings....
> >>
> >> Can some of the more experienced DSLR users please indicate how much of
> >> an
> >> operational issue sensor dust is and what precautions they take.
> >>
> >> cheers
> >>
> >> Lester
> >>

> >
> > Lester, please see my posts in rec.photo.digital.slr-systems. The thread
> > is
> > titled "sensor cleaning".
> >
> > I am also fairly new to the 20D and saw about 10-15 dust spots @ f/22
> > straight out of the box essentially. Initially I was very upset about

this
> > (being new to DSLR also) and it made me very uncomfortable. I did quite

a
> > bit of research and this is totally not uncommon. I tried the rocket air
> > bulb blower yesterday and it removed all my dust-spots. I did not resort
> > to
> > physically touching the sensor. Note that I had my significant other

hold
> > a
> > vacuum in the proximity of the camera while I used the blower (but I am
> > not
> > sure if this is really necessary).
> >
> > Here is a link to the rocket blower:
> >

http://www.bhphotovideo.com/bnh/cont...=259157&is=REG
> >
> > Here are some other cleaning methods/links **try at own risk!!**:
> > http://www.photo.net/equipment/digital/sensorcleaning/
> > http://www.pbase.com/copperhill/ccd_cleaning
> > http://www.luminous-landscape.com/es...cleaning.shtml
> >
> > After reading all the physical cleaning methods, I was very happy that

the
> > blower worked for me. Those C02 blowers look very good too.
> >
> > Hope this helps
> > Musty.
> >
> >

>
>



 
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Lester Wareham
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Posts: n/a
 
      12-31-2004

"Musty" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
news:%GgBd.37562$(E-Mail Removed)...
>
> "Lester Wareham" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
> news:41d5918e$0$21317$(E-Mail Removed)...
>> Anyone know of a UK supplier for "Sensor Swabs" and "Eclipse Optic

> Cleaner"
>> for sensor cleaning?
>>

>
> I would really try a bulb blower first. I think a lot of the sites which
> strongly advocate using direct contact cleaning methods are trying to sell
> it to you. There was a poster in the thread which I mentioned that said he
> had been using a bulb blower on DSLR for 3 years with success. It worked
> for
> me on a 20D. Direct cleaning should be a last resort only.
>
>


No I agree, I just want to find sutable materials if it comes to that. It
would have to be very bad though.


 
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