Velocity Reviews - Computer Hardware Reviews

Velocity Reviews > Newsgroups > Computing > Digital Photography > ARSAT 2.8/35 tilt and shift lens

Reply
Thread Tools

ARSAT 2.8/35 tilt and shift lens

 
 
clive
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      10-18-2004
Will be getting a Canon 20D and will need a shifting and sometimes
tilting lens. The Canon 24 and 45mm are a bit too expensive for my
occassional use and was looking into the Arsat 35mm.

Have not been able to find any reviews on the Arsat but assume the
quality, stopped down is OK - I would be using it on a tripod so do
not need to shoot wide open.

Will it work OK with the 20D - I assume that I will have to manually
focus.

Will the 20D exposure meter work, again I assume in stop down mode, or
does it require a Canon lens to interact with the body's electronics.

If it will not work can I take a test shot and determine from the
histogram the correct exposure? or will I need to get a hand held
meter.

Would there be any other issues I should know before I get one and are
there any alternatives?

Thanks

Clive
 
Reply With Quote
 
 
 
 
David R. Greenberg
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      10-18-2004
Hi Clive,

The first thing I'd suggest investigating is whether or not you really
need a T/S lens. If your application is architecture and you're trying
to prevent vertical line convergence, be aware that this type of
distortion can be corrected easily in Photoshop, with some limits.
Resolution is degraded somewhat in those regions of the image that need
to be expanded and the borders of the image become non-rectangular,
requiring a recropping. However, since you'll be starting with an
8.2Mpixel image, you will likely be able to tolerate these tradeoffs
quite well, as long as the corrections aren't severe.

David

 
Reply With Quote
 
 
 
 
TP
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      10-18-2004
"David R. Greenberg" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
>
>The first thing I'd suggest investigating is whether or not you really
>need a T/S lens. If your application is architecture and you're trying
>to prevent vertical line convergence, be aware that this type of
>distortion can be corrected easily in Photoshop, with some limits.
>Resolution is degraded somewhat in those regions of the image that need
>to be expanded and the borders of the image become non-rectangular,
>requiring a recropping. However, since you'll be starting with an
>8.2Mpixel image, you will likely be able to tolerate these tradeoffs
>quite well, as long as the corrections aren't severe.



I would like to know how you increase depth of field in Photoshop ...



 
Reply With Quote
 
Alan Browne
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      10-18-2004
TP wrote:

>
> I would like to know how you increase depth of field in Photoshop ...


We would like to know if you've ever shot hyperfocal. Or anything at all.

--
-- rec.photo.equipment.35mm user resource:
-- http://www.aliasimages.com/rpe35mmur.htm
-- e-meil: there's no such thing as a FreeLunch.--
 
Reply With Quote
 
Dallas
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      10-18-2004
On Mon, 18 Oct 2004 17:10:43 +0100, TP had this to say:

> "David R. Greenberg" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
>>
>>The first thing I'd suggest investigating is whether or not you really
>>need a T/S lens. If your application is architecture and you're trying to
>>prevent vertical line convergence, be aware that this type of distortion
>>can be corrected easily in Photoshop, with some limits. Resolution is
>>degraded somewhat in those regions of the image that need to be expanded
>>and the borders of the image become non-rectangular, requiring a
>>recropping. However, since you'll be starting with an 8.2Mpixel image,
>>you will likely be able to tolerate these tradeoffs quite well, as long
>>as the corrections aren't severe.

>
>
> I would like to know how you increase depth of field in Photoshop ...
>
>


Ask an expert. I recommend Brain Bird. Or is that Bran Bard? Byron Brad?
Bird Brain? Um...wait...Brian Baird. That's it. Professional expert on all
things Photoshop (not that you'd ever need any profesional advice).

--
DD™
Durban, South Africa.


 
Reply With Quote
 
me
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      10-18-2004
"clive" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
news:(E-Mail Removed) om...
> Will be getting a Canon 20D and will need a shifting and sometimes
> tilting lens. The Canon 24 and 45mm are a bit too expensive for my
> occassional use and was looking into the Arsat 35mm.
>
> Have not been able to find any reviews on the Arsat but assume the
> quality, stopped down is OK - I would be using it on a tripod so do
> not need to shoot wide open.
>
> Will it work OK with the 20D - I assume that I will have to manually
> focus.
>
> Will the 20D exposure meter work, again I assume in stop down mode, or
> does it require a Canon lens to interact with the body's electronics.
>
> If it will not work can I take a test shot and determine from the
> histogram the correct exposure? or will I need to get a hand held
> meter.
>
> Would there be any other issues I should know before I get one and are
> there any alternatives?
>
> Thanks
>
> Clive


Here's a review of the Arsat lens by Shutterbug Magazine:
http://www.shutterbug.net/features/0801sb_thewide/ If there are any
alternatives they are listed here:
http://www.ohse.de/uwe/articles/shift-tilt.html


 
Reply With Quote
 
clive
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      10-18-2004
Thanks David, I have investigated these ideas and as my work does
include, but not limited to, architectural shots I want to get things
correctly done at source. I have done some work doing perspective
corrections in software but there are limitations and trade offs. The
work needed to resize in the one direction to correctly retain the
scale is very time consuming. Also I will need om occassions to have
more than 8 mpixels - which I hope to do by stitching.


>
> The first thing I'd suggest investigating is whether or not you really
> need a T/S lens. If your application is architecture and you're trying
> to prevent vertical line convergence, be aware that this type of
> distortion can be corrected easily in Photoshop, with some limits.
> Resolution is degraded somewhat in those regions of the image that need
> to be expanded and the borders of the image become non-rectangular,
> requiring a recropping. However, since you'll be starting with an
> 8.2Mpixel image, you will likely be able to tolerate these tradeoffs
> quite well, as long as the corrections aren't severe.
>
> David

 
Reply With Quote
 
David Dyer-Bennet
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      10-24-2004
TP <(E-Mail Removed)> writes:

> "David R. Greenberg" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
>>
>>The first thing I'd suggest investigating is whether or not you really
>>need a T/S lens. If your application is architecture and you're trying
>>to prevent vertical line convergence, be aware that this type of
>>distortion can be corrected easily in Photoshop, with some limits.
>>Resolution is degraded somewhat in those regions of the image that need
>>to be expanded and the borders of the image become non-rectangular,
>>requiring a recropping. However, since you'll be starting with an
>>8.2Mpixel image, you will likely be able to tolerate these tradeoffs
>>quite well, as long as the corrections aren't severe.

>
>
> I would like to know how you increase depth of field in Photoshop ...
>
>


However, using a smaller sensor and hence a correspondingly shorter
focal-length lens does help.
--
David Dyer-Bennet, <(E-Mail Removed)>, <http://www.dd-b.net/dd-b/>
RKBA: <http://noguns-nomoney.com/> <http://www.dd-b.net/carry/>
Pics: <http://dd-b.lighthunters.net/> <http://www.dd-b.net/dd-b/SnapshotAlbum/>
Dragaera/Steven Brust: <http://dragaera.info/>
 
Reply With Quote
 
 
 
Reply

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Java left shift and right shift operators. Sanny Java 38 04-29-2011 10:02 PM
Re: Faking and expensive tilt-shift lens Sir John Howard Digital Photography 42 02-20-2009 03:13 AM
Tilt-shift in action Cynicor Digital Photography 22 01-30-2007 11:45 PM
No need for a tilt shift lens. Scott W Digital Photography 49 11-02-2005 04:06 AM



Advertisments