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Cold Photography Procedures

 
 
GT40
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      10-17-2004
On Sat, 16 Oct 2004 23:47:33 GMT, "Gadgets" <info@gadgetaus...com>
wrote:

>For the pool shooting, any way you can pre-warm the camera before arriving
>at the event? Like car heater or hot water bottle outside camera bag/heat
>pads in camera bag or something?


There wasn't in my case, becuase I was shooting something outside
before hand.
 
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Paul J Gans
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      10-17-2004
GT40 <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
>On Sat, 16 Oct 2004 20:14:24 +0000 (UTC), "Rob" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:


>>"GT40" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
>>news:(E-Mail Removed). ..
>>> The battery is the only problem shooting in cold, its the act of going
>>> from hot to cold thats the issue. Worse is cold to hot.
>>>
>>> Always keep batteries as warm as possible.
>>>

>>
>>Thanks for the reply. So essentially, you should just keep everything warm
>>(e.g. inside the jacket) until you need it?



>I keep batteries warm, but then my camera won't fit under my coat with
>a big lens on The other advantage is, the camera isn't swinging
>around so its eaiser to keep containted.


Why should a digital camera react worse to cold weather than
a 35 mm SLR? Both have batteries and the film gets brittle.
We coped with those problems for years.

Or am I missing something?

----- Paul J. Gans
 
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Charlie Self
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      10-17-2004
Paul Gans asks:

>>I keep batteries warm, but then my camera won't fit under my coat with
>>a big lens on The other advantage is, the camera isn't swinging
>>around so its eaiser to keep containted.

>
>Why should a digital camera react worse to cold weather than
>a 35 mm SLR? Both have batteries and the film gets brittle.
>We coped with those problems for years.
>
>Or am I missing something


They shouldn't, except for the batteries. Keep them warm, or have extras, and
you're in good shape. Many years ago, I was using a Canon F1 to shoot
motorcycle ice races in the Lake George, NY area. Something like 10-15 below
zero, F. Biggest problem I discovered was flashmarks on the film. Static
discharge from too fast winding or rewinding. Some film brittleness problems. I
had had the camera prepped--in essence, I was told, removal of the standard
lubes and insertion of light lubes--for super cold, so the shutter didn't hang.

I found the best way to avoid condensation/fogging problems was to just stay
outside, which means appropriate dress, because 15 below is approaching a
temperature danger zone when you're out for extended periods.

Charlie Self
"There are two ways of exerting one's strength: one is pushing down, the other
is pulling up." Booker T. Washington
 
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Marvin Margoshes
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      10-17-2004

"Phil Wheeler" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
newsVfcd.7336$(E-Mail Removed)...
>
>
> Rob wrote:
>> "GT40" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
>> news:(E-Mail Removed)...
>>
>>>The battery is the only problem shooting in cold, its the act of going
>>>from hot to cold thats the issue. Worse is cold to hot.
>>>
>>>Always keep batteries as warm as possible.
>>>

>>
>>
>> Thanks for the reply. So essentially, you should just keep everything
>> warm
>> (e.g. inside the jacket) until you need it?
>>

>
> LiIon batteries and Li batteries do work well when cold.
>
> Beware of lens fogging if you keep the camera warm and then take it out to
> shoot.
>


It is the other way around, as anyone who wears eyeglasses can tell you.
Come from the cold into a warm, moist room, and your glasses fog up.

> Phil
>



 
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Al Dykes
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      10-17-2004
In article <cksm2b$bcj$(E-Mail Removed)>,
Paul J Gans <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
>GT40 <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
>>On Sat, 16 Oct 2004 20:14:24 +0000 (UTC), "Rob" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:

>
>>>"GT40" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
>>>news:(E-Mail Removed) ...
>>>> The battery is the only problem shooting in cold, its the act of going
>>>> from hot to cold thats the issue. Worse is cold to hot.
>>>>
>>>> Always keep batteries as warm as possible.
>>>>
>>>
>>>Thanks for the reply. So essentially, you should just keep everything warm
>>>(e.g. inside the jacket) until you need it?

>
>
>>I keep batteries warm, but then my camera won't fit under my coat with
>>a big lens on The other advantage is, the camera isn't swinging
>>around so its eaiser to keep containted.

>
>Why should a digital camera react worse to cold weather than
>a 35 mm SLR? Both have batteries and the film gets brittle.
>We coped with those problems for years.
>
>Or am I missing something?
>
> ----- Paul J. Gans



In general, I agree, but there's about 1000x the electronics in a Dslr
as a film camera, and the engineers that design this stuff don't have
a budget to make it mil-spec.

FWIW I put my shiny new 300D out on the back porch one night last
winter when the temps were going to drop into the singe digits. It
sat there overnight. In the early morrning I went out, picked up the
camera and immediatly took a burst of shots. It worked fine. I
probably had the kit lens and a iGB microdrive on it.

If I was going out for the day in those temps I'd have at least two
battery packs, one in the camera and the others inside my jacket, and
swap them each time the one in the camera showed signs of low power.

It's possible that cold-tolerance may vary with lens model.
The little moters must work really hard if the lubrication is a
little thick.

If I was going to work in _really_ cold temps I'd check with the
manufacturer to see if there should be special lube, same as film
cameras, and check what temp the battery packs actually sustain damage
due to freezing.

In deep cold there's always static. I'd be nervious about zapping a CF
card while handling it, out of the camera. A really big CF dard solves
that problem.

Always carry a plastic bag with you and stuff the cold camera in it
before you bring it indoors.






--
Al Dykes
-----------
adykes at p a n i x . c o m
 
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Al Dykes
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Posts: n/a
 
      10-17-2004
In article <(E-Mail Removed)>,
GT40 <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
>On Sat, 16 Oct 2004 20:56:15 GMT, Phil Wheeler <(E-Mail Removed)>
>wrote:
>
>>
>>
>>Rob wrote:
>>> "GT40" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
>>> news:(E-Mail Removed)...
>>>
>>>>The battery is the only problem shooting in cold, its the act of going
>>>>from hot to cold thats the issue. Worse is cold to hot.
>>>>
>>>>Always keep batteries as warm as possible.
>>>>
>>>
>>>
>>> Thanks for the reply. So essentially, you should just keep everything warm
>>> (e.g. inside the jacket) until you need it?
>>>

>>
>>LiIon batteries and Li batteries do work well when cold.
>>
>>Beware of lens fogging if you keep the camera warm and then take it out
>>to shoot.

>
>I shot swimming at high schools. So its -10F outside then you go into
>a pool where its 80F (guess) and 100% humidity. Takes about 30min
>before the camera gets used to the conidtions and wont constantly fog
>up, I mean water is all over the camera and lens. Just have to keep
>wiping it off.



Take the batteries out and wrap it in a plastic bag before you leave
the house, and when you're in the gym leave the camera out for at
least 15 minutes before taking it out of the bag.

Keep the batteries on your person, so they'll be warm when you pop one
in the camera.

--
Al Dykes
-----------
adykes at p a n i x . c o m
 
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Paul J Gans
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Posts: n/a
 
      10-18-2004
Marvin Margoshes <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:

>"Phil Wheeler" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
>newsVfcd.7336$(E-Mail Removed).. .
>>
>>
>> Rob wrote:
>>> "GT40" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
>>> news:(E-Mail Removed)...
>>>
>>>>The battery is the only problem shooting in cold, its the act of going
>>>>from hot to cold thats the issue. Worse is cold to hot.
>>>>
>>>>Always keep batteries as warm as possible.
>>>>
>>>
>>>
>>> Thanks for the reply. So essentially, you should just keep everything
>>> warm
>>> (e.g. inside the jacket) until you need it?
>>>

>>
>> LiIon batteries and Li batteries do work well when cold.
>>
>> Beware of lens fogging if you keep the camera warm and then take it out to
>> shoot.
>>


>It is the other way around, as anyone who wears eyeglasses can tell you.
>Come from the cold into a warm, moist room, and your glasses fog up.


All that is required is that the lens or glasses (or whatever
surface) be below the dew point for the current conditions.

I was in Florida last summer (not a good time to go) and
had to leave my car outside in the sun one day. So I went
from the 101 degree outside temperature into my car and
my glasses fogged up.

That's how hot the air in the car was. My glasses were like a nice
cold surface to it.

----- Paul J. Gans

 
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Mark Johnson
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      10-18-2004
Phil Wheeler <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:

>andre wrote:


>>> The battery is the only problem shooting in cold, its the act of going
>>> from hot to cold thats the issue. Worse is cold to hot.


>Indeed. Ten days ago I was shooting in the tropical plant greenhouse in
>Golden Gate Park in San Francisco. Talk about instant fogging when
>entering the building (went from maybe 60 deg to 85-90 deg)!


If you give the camera a chance to settle - it'll slowly 'defog'. You
might have to use the microfibre to wipe the lens a few times. But it
should go away. Maybe if there were a cooler area, try there first, or
a fan? And then walk back into the humidity.
 
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Mark Johnson
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      10-18-2004
GT40 <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:

>I shot swimming at high schools. So its -10F outside then you go into
>a pool where its 80F (guess) and 100% humidity. Takes about 30min
>before the camera gets used to the conidtions and wont constantly fog
>up, I mean water is all over the camera and lens. Just have to keep
>wiping it off.


Right. You have to maybe wipe it a few times. But it will eventually
stop fogging. The problem is that, as others have mentioned, it's
almost impossible to keep the elements inside the lens from acquiring
the same moisture. It can be a breeding ground for fungus which can
etch the inside of lenses, over time. Something to check days or
weeks, later. And if it's a digicam, with a non-servicable lens, then
you have to buy another if it got to be a problem. If it's a lens for
a dSLR or SLR, if you have the rubberized press pod, you can unscrew
the retainer and carefully clean the elements inside and out.

Particularly with a dSLR, I would think the best thing is to bag the
camera, or use a water-proof housing. It's not just the camera - it's
the lens!
 
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GT40
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      10-18-2004
On Mon, 18 Oct 2004 03:48:28 -0700, Mark Johnson
<(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:

>GT40 <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
>
>>I shot swimming at high schools. So its -10F outside then you go into
>>a pool where its 80F (guess) and 100% humidity. Takes about 30min
>>before the camera gets used to the conidtions and wont constantly fog
>>up, I mean water is all over the camera and lens. Just have to keep
>>wiping it off.

>
>Right. You have to maybe wipe it a few times. But it will eventually
>stop fogging. The problem is that, as others have mentioned, it's
>almost impossible to keep the elements inside the lens from acquiring
>the same moisture. It can be a breeding ground for fungus which can
>etch the inside of lenses, over time. Something to check days or
>weeks, later. And if it's a digicam, with a non-servicable lens, then
>you have to buy another if it got to be a problem. If it's a lens for
>a dSLR or SLR, if you have the rubberized press pod, you can unscrew
>the retainer and carefully clean the elements inside and out.
>
>Particularly with a dSLR, I would think the best thing is to bag the
>camera, or use a water-proof housing. It's not just the camera - it's
>the lens!



The newspaper didn't own an underwater housing for the Nikon D1h with
80-200 2.8 lens. Never had a problem with the camera or lens growing
anything, but maybe the clohrine in the moist air killed it off
 
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