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Cold Photography Procedures

 
 
Rob
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      10-16-2004
What is the recommended "procedure" for shooting with digial cameras in cold
conditions? Let us say, -10 degrees C (14F) for the sake of argument.

The camera (ignoring the battery for now):
Is it best to keep the camera inside your jacket for warmth, or is it ok in
a bag? It would seem to me that it is best to keep it in the bag to avoid
condensation problems when you take it out for pictures. However, I expect
if you were in extreme cold, you would have problems like LCD freezing, lens
siezing up, etc.

Batteries:
I know that using litium-ion batteries when they are cold kills their life.
However, is keeping them in the cold a problem too? I have read places that
say they _should_ be stored cold. If both these things are true, it would
seem a good procedure would be to keep them in your bag until you need them,
then warm them up inside your jacket, then put them in the camera. This is
obviously quite a hassle for one photo, so would it just be easier to keep
everything inside your jacket and just be quick to avoid the condensation
issue?

Note: I am talking about rechargeable lithium-ion batteries, as opposed to
non-rechargeable lithium ones (I presume differences apply?). I am also
interested in procedures for 35mm cameras with lithium batteries, but I
realise this probably isn't the place to ask...

Forgive me if this has been covered before, but I couldn't find any complete
answers when searching.

Thanks,
Rob.


 
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GT40
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      10-16-2004
On Sat, 16 Oct 2004 16:00:39 +0000 (UTC), "Rob" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:

>What is the recommended "procedure" for shooting with digial cameras in cold
>conditions? Let us say, -10 degrees C (14F) for the sake of argument.
>
>The camera (ignoring the battery for now):
>Is it best to keep the camera inside your jacket for warmth, or is it ok in
>a bag? It would seem to me that it is best to keep it in the bag to avoid
>condensation problems when you take it out for pictures. However, I expect
>if you were in extreme cold, you would have problems like LCD freezing, lens
>siezing up, etc.


The battery is the only problem shooting in cold, its the act of going
from hot to cold thats the issue. Worse is cold to hot.

>
>Batteries:
>I know that using litium-ion batteries when they are cold kills their life.
>However, is keeping them in the cold a problem too? I have read places that
>say they _should_ be stored cold. If both these things are true, it would
>seem a good procedure would be to keep them in your bag until you need them,
>then warm them up inside your jacket, then put them in the camera. This is
>obviously quite a hassle for one photo, so would it just be easier to keep
>everything inside your jacket and just be quick to avoid the condensation
>issue?


Always keep batteries as warm as possible.


 
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andre
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      10-16-2004
GT40 wrote:
> On Sat, 16 Oct 2004 16:00:39 +0000 (UTC), "Rob" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
>
>
>>What is the recommended "procedure" for shooting with digial cameras in cold
>>conditions? Let us say, -10 degrees C (14F) for the sake of argument.
>>
>>The camera (ignoring the battery for now):
>>Is it best to keep the camera inside your jacket for warmth, or is it ok in
>>a bag? It would seem to me that it is best to keep it in the bag to avoid
>>condensation problems when you take it out for pictures. However, I expect
>>if you were in extreme cold, you would have problems like LCD freezing, lens
>>siezing up, etc.

>
>
> The battery is the only problem shooting in cold, its the act of going
> from hot to cold thats the issue. Worse is cold to hot.
>
>
>>Batteries:
>>I know that using litium-ion batteries when they are cold kills their life.
>>However, is keeping them in the cold a problem too? I have read places that
>>say they _should_ be stored cold. If both these things are true, it would
>>seem a good procedure would be to keep them in your bag until you need them,
>>then warm them up inside your jacket, then put them in the camera. This is
>>obviously quite a hassle for one photo, so would it just be easier to keep
>>everything inside your jacket and just be quick to avoid the condensation
>>issue?

>
>
> Always keep batteries as warm as possible.
>
>

I agree. You might even get less noise (thermal noise in sensor and
signal conditioning circuits). When you go inside, try bringing the
camera in slowly (I have no idea how). Otherwise you get condensation
inside your lens. This will be good breeding ground for some spores that
I have hard can make the lens unsharp. (Never happened to me but to others).

Andre

--
----------------------------------
http://www.aguntherphotography.com
 
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Rob
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      10-16-2004
"GT40" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
news:(E-Mail Removed)...
> The battery is the only problem shooting in cold, its the act of going
> from hot to cold thats the issue. Worse is cold to hot.
>
> Always keep batteries as warm as possible.
>


Thanks for the reply. So essentially, you should just keep everything warm
(e.g. inside the jacket) until you need it?

Cheers,
Rob.


 
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Phil Wheeler
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      10-16-2004


Rob wrote:
> "GT40" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
> news:(E-Mail Removed)...
>
>>The battery is the only problem shooting in cold, its the act of going
>>from hot to cold thats the issue. Worse is cold to hot.
>>
>>Always keep batteries as warm as possible.
>>

>
>
> Thanks for the reply. So essentially, you should just keep everything warm
> (e.g. inside the jacket) until you need it?
>


LiIon batteries and Li batteries do work well when cold.

Beware of lens fogging if you keep the camera warm and then take it out
to shoot.

Phil

 
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Phil Wheeler
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      10-16-2004


andre wrote:

>
>> The battery is the only problem shooting in cold, its the act of going
>> from hot to cold thats the issue. Worse is cold to hot.
>>


Indeed. Ten days ago I was shooting in the tropical plant greenhouse in
Golden Gate Park in San Francisco. Talk about instant fogging when
entering the building (went from maybe 60 deg to 85-90 deg)!

Phil

 
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GT40
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      10-16-2004
On Sat, 16 Oct 2004 20:14:24 +0000 (UTC), "Rob" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:

>"GT40" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
>news:(E-Mail Removed).. .
>> The battery is the only problem shooting in cold, its the act of going
>> from hot to cold thats the issue. Worse is cold to hot.
>>
>> Always keep batteries as warm as possible.
>>

>
>Thanks for the reply. So essentially, you should just keep everything warm
>(e.g. inside the jacket) until you need it?



I keep batteries warm, but then my camera won't fit under my coat with
a big lens on The other advantage is, the camera isn't swinging
around so its eaiser to keep containted.
 
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GT40
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      10-16-2004
On Sat, 16 Oct 2004 20:56:15 GMT, Phil Wheeler <(E-Mail Removed)>
wrote:

>
>
>Rob wrote:
>> "GT40" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
>> news:(E-Mail Removed)...
>>
>>>The battery is the only problem shooting in cold, its the act of going
>>>from hot to cold thats the issue. Worse is cold to hot.
>>>
>>>Always keep batteries as warm as possible.
>>>

>>
>>
>> Thanks for the reply. So essentially, you should just keep everything warm
>> (e.g. inside the jacket) until you need it?
>>

>
>LiIon batteries and Li batteries do work well when cold.
>
>Beware of lens fogging if you keep the camera warm and then take it out
>to shoot.


I shot swimming at high schools. So its -10F outside then you go into
a pool where its 80F (guess) and 100% humidity. Takes about 30min
before the camera gets used to the conidtions and wont constantly fog
up, I mean water is all over the camera and lens. Just have to keep
wiping it off.
 
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GT40
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      10-16-2004
On Sat, 16 Oct 2004 21:04:36 GMT, Phil Wheeler <(E-Mail Removed)>
wrote:

>
>
>andre wrote:
>
>>
>>> The battery is the only problem shooting in cold, its the act of going
>>> from hot to cold thats the issue. Worse is cold to hot.
>>>

>
>Indeed. Ten days ago I was shooting in the tropical plant greenhouse in
>Golden Gate Park in San Francisco. Talk about instant fogging when
>entering the building (went from maybe 60 deg to 85-90 deg)!


Try -10F outside to an indoor swimming event!
 
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Gadgets
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      10-16-2004
I've done some (film) shooting in -30C and followed what climbers have been
doing for years - keep camera inside jacket as much as poss. and at night
throw it in the foot of your sleeping bag. Lithium batteries are the most
cold tolerant, but besides batteries becoming less efficient in the cold,
people shooting in extended extremes may sometimes have the greases replaced
in-camera. Many an Everest climber has had their camera seize up after a
few minutes extreme exposure (windchill plus cold), but warming up again
will thaw it... If your batteries have died from the cold, removing them and
warming in hands or armpits will get you a few more shots.

For digis, you often get better battery life by leaving camera turned on,
than often switching it on/off - the battery is kept warm - so this might be
worth doing if you expect battery charge to last the duration of your trip,
just turn it off at the end of the day.

For preventing condensation, leaving it inside a camera bag allows for a
slower warmup, which should avoid the problem if you can wait...

For the pool shooting, any way you can pre-warm the camera before arriving
at the event? Like car heater or hot water bottle outside camera bag/heat
pads in camera bag or something?

Cheers, Jason (remove ... to reply)
Video & Gaming: http://gadgetaus.com
 
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