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Lens cleaning

 
 
Paul Westwell
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      09-19-2004
Hi all.

Having recently purchased a Fuji S5000 I was telling someone how I clean my
lens by breathing on it and wiping it with my hanky to which they responded
with panic!

Am I likely to do any harm, are their coatings really that delicate... is
the damage already done?

Regards,

Paul


 
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Marvin Margoshes
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      09-19-2004

"Paul Westwell" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
news:46i3d.120$(E-Mail Removed)...
> Hi all.
>
> Having recently purchased a Fuji S5000 I was telling someone how I clean
> my lens by breathing on it and wiping it with my hanky to which they
> responded with panic!
>
> Am I likely to do any harm, are their coatings really that delicate... is
> the damage already done?
>
> Regards,
>
> Paul


There are usually tiny bits of material on a hanky that can scratch the
coating. The accumulated scratches will be worse than the dirt.


 
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wayne
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      09-19-2004
if the camera has the mount get a filter for it so you scratch the filter.
I found the moist lens cleaners made for plastic eyeglass lenses seem to
work pretty well. They look like wet naps!

Wayne

"Paul Westwell" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
news:46i3d.120$(E-Mail Removed)...
> Hi all.
>
> Having recently purchased a Fuji S5000 I was telling someone how I clean
> my lens by breathing on it and wiping it with my hanky to which they
> responded with panic!
>
> Am I likely to do any harm, are their coatings really that delicate... is
> the damage already done?
>
> Regards,
>
> Paul
>



 
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Bill Crocker
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      09-19-2004
A clean hanky is perfect. They're soft cotton, and will do no harm. Your
breath is just condensed moisture, and would not carry any contaminants.
Take a shot of Jack Daniels, before breathing on the lens, for those really
stubborn spots! You do have to be careful about rubbing the lens
however, as particles on the lens could scratch it. They recommend you use
a camels hair brush. Preferably from a camel that hasn't spent too much
time in the desert.
Bill Crocker


"Paul Westwell" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
news:46i3d.120$(E-Mail Removed)...
> Hi all.
>
> Having recently purchased a Fuji S5000 I was telling someone how I clean
> my lens by breathing on it and wiping it with my hanky to which they
> responded with panic!
>
> Am I likely to do any harm, are their coatings really that delicate... is
> the damage already done?
>
> Regards,
>
> Paul
>



 
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Gene Palmiter
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      09-19-2004
Years ago I was a photography student and had the time to use a proper lens
kit....as a working photojournalist I don't have that time. I keep a
protective skylight filter on all lenses and wipe them with my tee-shirt
when necessary. I buy a new protective filter as necessary...about every
year....and that is mostly from big scratches...not the little ones from
cleaning. (I don't use a lens cap as too often I forget to take it off and
miss the first and usually best shot.

"Paul Westwell" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
news:46i3d.120$(E-Mail Removed)...
> Hi all.
>
> Having recently purchased a Fuji S5000 I was telling someone how I clean

my
> lens by breathing on it and wiping it with my hanky to which they

responded
> with panic!
>
> Am I likely to do any harm, are their coatings really that delicate... is
> the damage already done?
>
> Regards,
>
> Paul
>
>



 
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Joseph Meehan
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Posts: n/a
 
      09-19-2004
Paul Westwell wrote:
> Hi all.
>
> Having recently purchased a Fuji S5000 I was telling someone how I clean
> my
> lens


How often do you clean your lens??? It should need cleaning only
rarely. Few lenses are ever damaged. Lenses and not as sensitive as they
were many years ago. However I am going to guess that more lenses are
damaged by cleaning than by anything else. Almost all of that cleaning is
excessive cleaning.

> by breathing on it and wiping it with my hanky to which they responded
> with panic!


Given a clean hanky, not one that has been in your pocket with loose
change and who knows what for three weeks is fine.

The safest leaning would be a puff of clean dry air, as from a clean ear
syringe. Next would be a clean camel hair brush. Your method is good (a
true lens cleaning tissue, used once and discarded would be better) for
smudges etc that will not come off with the air or brush. In any case,
don't clean unless it is really needed.

I don't subscribe to the "protective filter" thing many people and
almost all camera salespeople try to say is necessary but decide for
yourself.

>
> Am I likely to do any harm, are their coatings really that delicate...


No, no lens made today uses the kind of soft glass and coatings that
started all this fear. I might add that even back in the old days, the
"damage" did not really do much real damage. It is mostly worry and not
fact.

> is
> the damage already done?


Not likely.

>
> Regards,
>
> Paul


--
Joseph E. Meehan

26 + 6 = 1 It's Irish Math



 
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David Littlewood
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Posts: n/a
 
      09-19-2004
In article <46i3d.120$(E-Mail Removed)>, Paul Westwell
<(E-Mail Removed)> writes
>Hi all.
>
>Having recently purchased a Fuji S5000 I was telling someone how I clean my
>lens by breathing on it and wiping it with my hanky to which they responded
>with panic!
>
>Am I likely to do any harm, are their coatings really that delicate... is
>the damage already done?
>
>Regards,
>

Forget the hanky and buy yourself a microfibre lens cleaning cloth. A
perfectly clean hanky won't do much damage, but if it's in your pocket
collecting grit it may do. No, the real advantage of the microfibre
cloths is that they absorb oil (e.g. from sweaty fingerprints - and by
definition all fingerprints are sweaty) much better than cotton fibres.
They are not that expensive, can be washed when soiled, and last a long
time.

Don't clean your lens unless it really needs it.

Breathing is fine, I have done it myself for 30 years and never
experienced any problem. It helps to emulsify oily marks and get them
absorbed in the cloth. Avoid spitting on the lens though - wipe your
lips before breathing on it..
--
David Littlewood
 
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Gene Palmiter
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Posts: n/a
 
      09-19-2004
Spitting can be real bad if you are eating something gritty!

"David Littlewood" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
news:(E-Mail Removed)...
> In article <46i3d.120$(E-Mail Removed)>, Paul Westwell
> <(E-Mail Removed)> writes
> >Hi all.
> >
> >Having recently purchased a Fuji S5000 I was telling someone how I clean

my
> >lens by breathing on it and wiping it with my hanky to which they

responded
> >with panic!
> >
> >Am I likely to do any harm, are their coatings really that delicate... is
> >the damage already done?
> >
> >Regards,
> >

> Forget the hanky and buy yourself a microfibre lens cleaning cloth. A
> perfectly clean hanky won't do much damage, but if it's in your pocket
> collecting grit it may do. No, the real advantage of the microfibre
> cloths is that they absorb oil (e.g. from sweaty fingerprints - and by
> definition all fingerprints are sweaty) much better than cotton fibres.
> They are not that expensive, can be washed when soiled, and last a long
> time.
>
> Don't clean your lens unless it really needs it.
>
> Breathing is fine, I have done it myself for 30 years and never
> experienced any problem. It helps to emulsify oily marks and get them
> absorbed in the cloth. Avoid spitting on the lens though - wipe your
> lips before breathing on it..
> --
> David Littlewood



 
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Randall Ainsworth
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Posts: n/a
 
      09-19-2004
In article <gNk3d.66298$(E-Mail Removed)>, Joseph Meehan
<(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:

> I don't subscribe to the "protective filter" thing many people and
> almost all camera salespeople try to say is necessary but decide for
> yourself.


Gotta agree with you on this one. But they sell a lot of filters that
way.
 
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Joseph Meehan
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Posts: n/a
 
      09-19-2004
Randall Ainsworth wrote:
> In article <gNk3d.66298$(E-Mail Removed)>, Joseph Meehan
> <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
>
>> I don't subscribe to the "protective filter" thing many people and
>> almost all camera salespeople try to say is necessary but decide for
>> yourself.

>
> Gotta agree with you on this one. But they sell a lot of filters that
> way.


Some did when I was in the business. Lucky for me I did not have a boss
that believed in that kind of customer treatment even though we often made
much more from the sale of accessories than the camera.

--
Joseph E. Meehan

26 + 6 = 1 It's Irish Math



 
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