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Re: Best way to transfer files between computers?

 
 
Doc
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      06-08-2006
If I have one machine set up to capture/edit video and another for music
production, what would be a good way to transfer files between them? Say, a
musical piece I've created that I want to use in a video.

If both machines have Firewire or USB 2, can those be used for rapid data
transmission between machines? If so, how would it be done? Is there more to
it than simply running a cable between machines?

The reasons for doing this are if the video machine is rendering, I can
still be working on recording, and also so I can use the DVD burners in one
machine for everything.

Thanks for all input.


 
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jakdedert
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      06-08-2006
Doc wrote:
> If I have one machine set up to capture/edit video and another for music
> production, what would be a good way to transfer files between them? Say, a
> musical piece I've created that I want to use in a video.
>
> If both machines have Firewire or USB 2, can those be used for rapid data
> transmission between machines? If so, how would it be done? Is there more to
> it than simply running a cable between machines?
>
> The reasons for doing this are if the video machine is rendering, I can
> still be working on recording, and also so I can use the DVD burners in one
> machine for everything.
>
> Thanks for all input.
>
>
>

You need ethernet. Even just an old 10 meg card in both machines with a
crossover cable will be faster than USB; and most cards today are
100megs...less than $10 some places.

You 'could' go gigabaud....

jak

 
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Doc
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      06-08-2006

"jakdedert" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
news:RDOhg.2707$y%(E-Mail Removed)...

> You need ethernet. Even just an old 10 meg card in both machines with a
> crossover cable will be faster than USB; and most cards today are
> 100megs...less than $10 some places.


I'm not real familiar with ethernet, other than having seen the jack on the
back - looks like a phone jack, correct? What does the meg size indicate? If
both machines have built-in ethernet connections, should that work okay? Is
there more to it than simply plugging in the cable?

And Ethernet is faster than USB 2.0 or Firewire?


 
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Grinder
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      06-08-2006
Doc wrote:
> "jakdedert" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
> news:RDOhg.2707$y%(E-Mail Removed)...
>
>> You need ethernet. Even just an old 10 meg card in both machines with a
>> crossover cable will be faster than USB; and most cards today are
>> 100megs...less than $10 some places.

>
> I'm not real familiar with ethernet, other than having seen the jack on the
> back - looks like a phone jack, correct?


Yes. It's a bit wider that most phone cords -- 8 wires instead of 4.

> What does the meg size indicate?


It's the transfer speed. 10/100 megabit (per second) are quite common,
and you should be able to find one for less than $10. Many PCs come
with an Ethernet controller standard -- either as a plug-in card, or
right on the motherboard.

> If both machines have built-in ethernet connections,
> should that work okay?


Yes.

> Is there more to it than simply plugging in the cable?


A little bit more. You'll need to make sure that you have a *crossover*
cable. You should be able to find one from a local supplier for less
than $10 (more like $3-4.)

From there the setup is fairly easy, but varies a bit from operating
system to operating system.

> And Ethernet is faster than USB 2.0 or Firewire?


USB 2.0 Hi-Speed is supposed to be 480 megabit/s, which is obviously
faster than an Ethernet card cranking out 100 megabit/s. There are a
variety of fireware incarnations, but most of them appear to be *at
least* 100 megabit/s. So, unless you go with *gigabit* ethernet
controllers, it will not be faster than USB 2.0 or Firewire.

That said, though, I would still recommend getting your PCs network
ready for these reasons:

1) USB can be kind of finicky. Ethernet, on the other hand,
is super reliable and super easy to set up.

2) It will be easier and cheaper to expand an Ethernet network
to include additional machines.

3) Having an Ethernet network is a cheap and secure way to
share a broadband connection amongst multiple machines.


additional machines than to
 
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GregS
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      06-08-2006
In article <n5Phg.3036$(E-Mail Removed) et>, "Doc" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
>
>"jakdedert" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
>news:RDOhg.2707$y%(E-Mail Removed).. .
>
>> You need ethernet. Even just an old 10 meg card in both machines with a
>> crossover cable will be faster than USB; and most cards today are
>> 100megs...less than $10 some places.

>
>I'm not real familiar with ethernet, other than having seen the jack on the
>back - looks like a phone jack, correct? What does the meg size indicate? If
>both machines have built-in ethernet connections, should that work okay? Is
>there more to it than simply plugging in the cable?
>
>And Ethernet is faster than USB 2.0 or Firewire?


Not sure about which is faster. 10mb is pretty fast and 100 mb should
suit most any needs. You need a crossover cable for the eithernet,
not just a standard cable.
I have tried eithernet, USB, and removable hard disks.
Its still a pain to interface two computers. Perhaps XP is different.
I bought a USB interface cable, and I could not get it to work.

greg
 
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tony sayer
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      06-08-2006
In article <e6969s$lh8$(E-Mail Removed)>, GregS
<(E-Mail Removed)> writes
>In article <n5Phg.3036$(E-Mail Removed) et>, "Doc"
><(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
>>
>>"jakdedert" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
>>news:RDOhg.2707$y%(E-Mail Removed). ..
>>
>>> You need ethernet. Even just an old 10 meg card in both machines with a
>>> crossover cable will be faster than USB; and most cards today are
>>> 100megs...less than $10 some places.

>>
>>I'm not real familiar with ethernet, other than having seen the jack on the
>>back - looks like a phone jack, correct? What does the meg size indicate? If
>>both machines have built-in ethernet connections, should that work okay? Is
>>there more to it than simply plugging in the cable?
>>
>>And Ethernet is faster than USB 2.0 or Firewire?

>
>Not sure about which is faster. 10mb is pretty fast and 100 mb should
>suit most any needs. You need a crossover cable for the eithernet,
>not just a standard cable.
>I have tried eithernet, USB, and removable hard disks.
>Its still a pain to interface two computers. Perhaps XP is different.
>I bought a USB interface cable, and I could not get it to work.
>
>greg


If your on broadband treat yourself to a router with a built in 4 way
switch and its no problem at all to link your PC's together on a small
network as well as giving you net access to all.

Most PC's in recent years have a 10/100 socket built in but a 10/100 PCI
card shouldn't cost more than say 10, and the CAT5 network stuff isn't
that expensive either.

With that format you simply take a lead from each PC to the router
switch and thats it!...
--
Tony Sayer

 
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Doc
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      06-08-2006

"Grinder" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
news:ZrPhg.1010894$xm3.82854@attbi_s21...

> 1) USB can be kind of finicky. Ethernet, on the other hand,
> is super reliable and super easy to set up.
>
> 2) It will be easier and cheaper to expand an Ethernet network
> to include additional machines.
>
> 3) Having an Ethernet network is a cheap and secure way to
> share a broadband connection amongst multiple machines.


Okay. Two of these aren't likely to apply any time soon, I'm on dialup which
is likely to be the case for some time, and don't foresee ever connecting
more than the 2 machines.


 
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jakdedert
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      06-08-2006
Doc wrote:
> "Grinder" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
> news:ZrPhg.1010894$xm3.82854@attbi_s21...
>
>> 1) USB can be kind of finicky. Ethernet, on the other hand,
>> is super reliable and super easy to set up.
>>
>> 2) It will be easier and cheaper to expand an Ethernet network
>> to include additional machines.
>>
>> 3) Having an Ethernet network is a cheap and secure way to
>> share a broadband connection amongst multiple machines.

>
> Okay. Two of these aren't likely to apply any time soon, I'm on dialup which
> is likely to be the case for some time, and don't foresee ever connecting
> more than the 2 machines.
>

So you have everything you need for a fast connection, save the
crossover cable (which simply plugs from one machine to the other).
Google 'DIY networking' and get going.

BTW, if you have any desire, the crossover cable will allow you to share
even your dialup connection. OTOH, you say you never foresee having
more than two computers. Many people say that, then get a laptop (most
of which also have built in ethernet port). Cool...all you need to
connect it is a couple more cables and a hub.

jak


 
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Paul
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Posts: n/a
 
      06-08-2006
In article <QCVhg.3109$(E-Mail Removed) et>, "Doc"
<(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:

> "Grinder" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
> news:ZrPhg.1010894$xm3.82854@attbi_s21...
>
> > 1) USB can be kind of finicky. Ethernet, on the other hand,
> > is super reliable and super easy to set up.
> >
> > 2) It will be easier and cheaper to expand an Ethernet network
> > to include additional machines.
> >
> > 3) Having an Ethernet network is a cheap and secure way to
> > share a broadband connection amongst multiple machines.

>
> Okay. Two of these aren't likely to apply any time soon, I'm on dialup which
> is likely to be the case for some time, and don't foresee ever connecting
> more than the 2 machines.


There is a Gigabit Ethernet card here with a VIA ethernet chip.
http://www.syba.com/product/42/05/02/index.html

Available here for $12.50
http://www.supergooddeal.com/Product...GA&Click=17583

A similar product with a VIA chip here $11.00
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Produc...82E16833330001

The picture of the $11.00 networking card, looks to match the "Velocity"
chip at the top of this page:

http://www.vntek.com/en/products/menu_nic.jsp

There are VT6120/VT6122 VIA drivers at the top of this page (Velocity chip):

http://www.vntek.com/en/resources/do...er/drivers.jsp

Then, a cable to connect the two computers together, and you are ready
for networking. With Gigabit Ethernet cards, there is no difference
between straight-thru and crossover cables - the hardware automatically
figures out which cable is being used (I think this is referred to as
MDI/MDIX). I've certainly used that fact to advantage with my three
Gigabit equipped computers at home here.

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Produc...82E16812189023

Wire the machines like this:

<this PC uses ICS>
+---------------------------------+ +-------------------+
| | Ethernet | |
Phone_Line -- Dialup_Modem---PC#1---EthernetCard <-------> EthernetCard---PC#2 |
| | Cable | |
+---------------------------------+ +-------------------+
<dialup_address> 192.168.0.1 192.168.0.2

By enabling Internet Connection Sharing (ICS), that makes it possible to have
two networking interfaces on a computer. In your case, the dialup is one
interface,
and the new Gigabit Ethernet card will be the other one. The private IP
addresses 192.168.0.1 and 192.168.0.2 are not routable, and don't show up on
the Internet. You can surf from either computer, and the outside world only
sees one IP address in use, and that is the <dialup_address> assigned by the
modem pool at the other end of the phone line. You should also be able to
hang up the dialup connection, and still transfer files between the two
computers (I hope).

http://support.microsoft.com/kb/314066/en-us

I tested a similar configuration, using Win2K as my OS, and the best transfer
rate I could get (using artificial test conditions) was 40MB/sec. WinXP
networking
should be able to do better than that, but you'll have to do your own research
on the web, to get some benchmarks. Using Windows File Sharing, may not be the
fastest way to transfer files, and I was using FTP protocol for my testing.

In any case, two $11 cards and a cheap cable, is a pretty low cost experiment.
With any luck, it will transfer files as fast as your single target disk
can manage.

Firewire 400 and Firewire 800 can be used for networking. In terms of
transfer rates,
the theoretical limit would be 50MB/sec and 100MB/sec respectively. The Gigabit
Ethernet can do 125MB/sec in theory (minus packet overheads and
interpacket gap).
You can network with USB, by using a USB2 PCLinq cable (there is a silicon chip
in the middle of the cable, that isolates the two computers). But the transfer
rate on that should not be very fast, and will be not even close to the other
numbers already mentioned. USB2 is 480Mbits/sec, which is 60MB/sec theoretical,
57MB/sec considering overhead, and a lot less when software intervention
is needed
to transfer files via PCLinq.

Considering the price of some of these technologies, you could practically
afford
to try them all out

Paul
 
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kony
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      06-09-2006
On Thu, 08 Jun 2006 12:47:10 GMT, http://www.velocityreviews.com/forums/(E-Mail Removed) (GregS)
wrote:

>In article <n5Phg.3036$(E-Mail Removed) et>, "Doc" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
>>
>>"jakdedert" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
>>news:RDOhg.2707$y%(E-Mail Removed). ..
>>
>>> You need ethernet. Even just an old 10 meg card in both machines with a
>>> crossover cable will be faster than USB; and most cards today are
>>> 100megs...less than $10 some places.

>>
>>I'm not real familiar with ethernet, other than having seen the jack on the
>>back - looks like a phone jack, correct? What does the meg size indicate? If
>>both machines have built-in ethernet connections, should that work okay? Is
>>there more to it than simply plugging in the cable?
>>
>>And Ethernet is faster than USB 2.0 or Firewire?

>
>Not sure about which is faster. 10mb is pretty fast and 100 mb should
>suit most any needs.



Definitely not.

Editing audio, video, or burning DVDs is FAR too bandwidth
intensive for 10Mb. Typically 100Mb realized throughput is
optimally around 9MB/s, also very slow for DVD or video
editing, but perhaps enough IF the audio is compressed
already.

The best option is to buy two Gigabit ethernet cards and a
plain (crossover not necessary with GbE) cable. Even the
cheapest ~ $12 each cards can be expected to perform up to
the PCI bus and HDD performance limits, over 35MB/s which is
still a bit on the low side for video editing in many cases
but if the data has to be transferred, this is probably the
best long term solution without a lot of cost or effort.
 
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