Velocity Reviews - Computer Hardware Reviews

Velocity Reviews > Newsgroups > Computing > Computer Information > help! Why would pc blow fuse?

Reply
Thread Tools

help! Why would pc blow fuse?

 
 
Dee
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      10-24-2005
My daughters fairly old pc keeps blowing the fuse in the plug (I'm in the
UK). It had a new power supply, heatsink and fan about 6 months and was fine
but then a couple of weeks ago this started. Sometimes it will stay on for
just a few minutes, sometimes an hour or more. (Fuse is currently 16amp -
originally it was 5).
Spec is AMD Athlon 1200 processor, 120mb RAM, 20G HDD, running XP. I know
it's pretty old and it's short on RAM and the processor is slow but it was
fine for what she used it for (typing letters, browsing eBay, internet
banking, email etc). No programs or hardware have been recently added


 
Reply With Quote
 
 
 
 
Fakename
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      10-25-2005
You should have an electrician have a look. Nothing is worth the risk
of a fire in your home right?

Dee wrote:
> My daughters fairly old pc keeps blowing the fuse in the plug (I'm in the
> UK). It had a new power supply, heatsink and fan about 6 months and was fine
> but then a couple of weeks ago this started. Sometimes it will stay on for
> just a few minutes, sometimes an hour or more. (Fuse is currently 16amp -
> originally it was 5).
> Spec is AMD Athlon 1200 processor, 120mb RAM, 20G HDD, running XP. I know
> it's pretty old and it's short on RAM and the processor is slow but it was
> fine for what she used it for (typing letters, browsing eBay, internet
> banking, email etc). No programs or hardware have been recently added
>
>

 
Reply With Quote
 
 
 
 
Brian
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      10-26-2005
by increasing the amps on the fuse it won't be long before you find the weak
point in the system. (not a good idea for troubleshooting or workaround) It
may also cause damage to other components in your system. I recommend
letting a pro look at it to determine the issue and correct the problem
before something gets fried.


 
Reply With Quote
 
remove 1st and 3rd @ (anti spam @s)
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      10-26-2005
Sounds like the new power supply is faulty.
5 Amps fues should be perfectly adequate.
In fact 2 or 3 amp fuses should also be fine too.

The most likely fault, from your description, is an intermittent short
in the power supply unit. Unless you are aware of the dangers it would
be very unwise to open it yourself to see. In any case these are not
expensive items for that PC (200W or 300W models should be fine for
this PC).

Putting in 16amp fuses is not a good idea - you run a slight risk that
the fault will draw up to 15 amps without blowing the fuse and that
kind of current in a PC is going to cause burning, melting, smells and
possibly smoke... In this regard, while you have this problem still,
make sure this PC is unplugged from the mains when not in use and not
just turned off at the PC.

Since the power supply is only 6 months old it should presumably still
be under guarantee.

A simple check, just in case it is the cable, plug or connector, is to
change the power lead (complete).

It is very unlikely to be anything other than those two items.

Paul E. Coughin


On Mon, 24 Oct 2005 12:27:05 +0100, "Dee" <(E-Mail Removed)>
wrote:

>My daughters fairly old pc keeps blowing the fuse in the plug (I'm in

the
>UK). It had a new power supply, heatsink and fan about 6 months and

was fine
>but then a couple of weeks ago this started. Sometimes it will stay

on for
>just a few minutes, sometimes an hour or more. (Fuse is currently

16amp -
>originally it was 5).
>Spec is AMD Athlon 1200 processor, 120mb RAM, 20G HDD, running XP. I

know
>it's pretty old and it's short on RAM and the processor is slow but

it was
>fine for what she used it for (typing letters, browsing eBay,

internet
>banking, email etc). No programs or hardware have been recently added
>


 
Reply With Quote
 
Robert Baer
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      10-27-2005
Brian wrote:

> by increasing the amps on the fuse it won't be long before you find the weak
> point in the system. (not a good idea for troubleshooting or workaround) It
> may also cause damage to other components in your system. I recommend
> letting a pro look at it to determine the issue and correct the problem
> before something gets fried.
>
>

I cannot see the previous postings concerning this issue, but if a
fuze blows, the first thing to replace is the power supply.
BTW, AFAIK all PCs have the fuze *inside* the power supply, and as
the recommendation goes, only a service tech should open it up (and a
supply would cost far less than having that done).
 
Reply With Quote
 
Last Boy Scout
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      11-25-2005
Dee wrote:

> My daughters fairly old pc keeps blowing the fuse in the plug (I'm in the
> UK). It had a new power supply, heatsink and fan about 6 months and was fine
> but then a couple of weeks ago this started. Sometimes it will stay on for
> just a few minutes, sometimes an hour or more. (Fuse is currently 16amp -
> originally it was 5).
> Spec is AMD Athlon 1200 processor, 120mb RAM, 20G HDD, running XP. I know
> it's pretty old and it's short on RAM and the processor is slow but it was
> fine for what she used it for (typing letters, browsing eBay, internet
> banking, email etc). No programs or hardware have been recently added
>
>

Maybe it is the plug.

Do the wires get hot?

Ok what is the plugs rating?

How many watts can it handle. AMD is typically around 300 watts for an
average system. What is the power supply rated at? It should match the
power supply. Some power supplies are not very efficient. What kind is
it. Hopefully it is not a Deer.

OK the computer uses X number of watts, but the power supply also uses
power to convert the 110 or 220 to 12v or whatever. The power that is
burned up in heat, which is released by the fins on the power supply
over the power created is the efficiency rating. So the wasted power
plus the power created are added together.

OK you may be using more power than the actual wall plug is rated for.

OK then you may have both the monitor and the PC plugged into a power
strip. If not use a good power strip designed to absorb power surges
and loads. A small UPS might absorb power fluctuations. If the CPU is
heating up, it might have an automatic circuit which speeds up and slows
down if the processor is getting hot.

So try a good Powerstrip and maybe a UPS.

The Power supply you used should be a premium model that runs both quiet
and cool. I like standard Antec Power Supplies. A cheaper power supply
is sometimes just as good. However some power suppies are not so
reputable. Deer is a model that should not be purchased. I have heard
of some power supplies blowihg out violently or catching on fire. If a
surge is released, then your computer is destroyed.

These are just a few ideas.
 
Reply With Quote
 
DiddyS400
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      11-26-2005

"Last Boy Scout" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
news:atGhf.571$(E-Mail Removed)...
> Dee wrote:
>
> > My daughters fairly old pc keeps blowing the fuse in the plug (I'm in

the
> > UK). It had a new power supply, heatsink and fan about 6 months and was

fine
> > but then a couple of weeks ago this started. Sometimes it will stay on

for
> > just a few minutes, sometimes an hour or more. (Fuse is currently

16amp -
> > originally it was 5).
> > Spec is AMD Athlon 1200 processor, 120mb RAM, 20G HDD, running XP. I

know
> > it's pretty old and it's short on RAM and the processor is slow but it

was
> > fine for what she used it for (typing letters, browsing eBay, internet
> > banking, email etc). No programs or hardware have been recently added



This will sound stupid, but..........Are you sure the fuse is blowing?

My computer seemed to be blowing fuses at random - it would just stop,
apparently with no power reaching it. After replacing the fuse in the plug
it would be OK until the next time. Then I noticed that although it had
"blown a fuse" there was an LCD lit up on the motherboard, so power was
still getting through. This time I just switched it off at the wall socket
and left it a few minutes before turning it back on. Sure enough it booted
up just fine. Something must be causing it to trip some kind of circuit
breaker somewhere. I don't know what, but I do know now that its not blowing
fuses.

Might be worth trying this on yours?

Derek.


 
Reply With Quote
 
Robert Baer
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      11-27-2005
DiddyS400 wrote:

> "Last Boy Scout" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
> news:atGhf.571$(E-Mail Removed)...
>
>>Dee wrote:
>>
>>
>>>My daughters fairly old pc keeps blowing the fuse in the plug (I'm in

>
> the
>
>>>UK). It had a new power supply, heatsink and fan about 6 months and was

>
> fine
>
>>>but then a couple of weeks ago this started. Sometimes it will stay on

>
> for
>
>>>just a few minutes, sometimes an hour or more. (Fuse is currently

>
> 16amp -
>
>>>originally it was 5).
>>>Spec is AMD Athlon 1200 processor, 120mb RAM, 20G HDD, running XP. I

>
> know
>
>>>it's pretty old and it's short on RAM and the processor is slow but it

>
> was
>
>>>fine for what she used it for (typing letters, browsing eBay, internet
>>>banking, email etc). No programs or hardware have been recently added

>
>
>
> This will sound stupid, but..........Are you sure the fuse is blowing?
>
> My computer seemed to be blowing fuses at random - it would just stop,
> apparently with no power reaching it. After replacing the fuse in the plug
> it would be OK until the next time. Then I noticed that although it had
> "blown a fuse" there was an LCD lit up on the motherboard, so power was
> still getting through. This time I just switched it off at the wall socket
> and left it a few minutes before turning it back on. Sure enough it booted
> up just fine. Something must be causing it to trip some kind of circuit
> breaker somewhere. I don't know what, but I do know now that its not blowing
> fuses.
>
> Might be worth trying this on yours?
>
> Derek.
>
>

*WARNING* !!NEVER!! replace a fuse with a higher rated one - you are
*asking* for a fire!!!
 
Reply With Quote
 
M DAVID FERRELL
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      03-07-2006
I'd have to say that this is probably a power supply issue.. Old power
supplies can heat up and it drastically increases the current draw. It
doesn't take a lot of heat to nearly double the power consumption of these
devices. The heat is also indicative of an imminent failure. Before the
motherboard and processor become damaged, I would replace the power supply.
A fairly generic 180W unit should be ample plenty for such an old machine.
Also, when you replace the PS, clean all the insdie of the machine with a
can of compressed air. It will all be cooler and run better! Good luck!
"Last Boy Scout" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
news:atGhf.571$(E-Mail Removed)...
> Dee wrote:
>
> > My daughters fairly old pc keeps blowing the fuse in the plug (I'm in

the
> > UK). It had a new power supply, heatsink and fan about 6 months and was

fine
> > but then a couple of weeks ago this started. Sometimes it will stay on

for
> > just a few minutes, sometimes an hour or more. (Fuse is currently

16amp -
> > originally it was 5).
> > Spec is AMD Athlon 1200 processor, 120mb RAM, 20G HDD, running XP. I

know
> > it's pretty old and it's short on RAM and the processor is slow but it

was
> > fine for what she used it for (typing letters, browsing eBay, internet
> > banking, email etc). No programs or hardware have been recently added
> >
> >

> Maybe it is the plug.
>
> Do the wires get hot?
>
> Ok what is the plugs rating?
>
> How many watts can it handle. AMD is typically around 300 watts for an
> average system. What is the power supply rated at? It should match the
> power supply. Some power supplies are not very efficient. What kind is
> it. Hopefully it is not a Deer.
>
> OK the computer uses X number of watts, but the power supply also uses
> power to convert the 110 or 220 to 12v or whatever. The power that is
> burned up in heat, which is released by the fins on the power supply
> over the power created is the efficiency rating. So the wasted power
> plus the power created are added together.
>
> OK you may be using more power than the actual wall plug is rated for.
>
> OK then you may have both the monitor and the PC plugged into a power
> strip. If not use a good power strip designed to absorb power surges
> and loads. A small UPS might absorb power fluctuations. If the CPU is
> heating up, it might have an automatic circuit which speeds up and slows
> down if the processor is getting hot.
>
> So try a good Powerstrip and maybe a UPS.
>
> The Power supply you used should be a premium model that runs both quiet
> and cool. I like standard Antec Power Supplies. A cheaper power supply
> is sometimes just as good. However some power suppies are not so
> reputable. Deer is a model that should not be purchased. I have heard
> of some power supplies blowihg out violently or catching on fire. If a
> surge is released, then your computer is destroyed.
>
> These are just a few ideas.



 
Reply With Quote
 
 
 
Reply

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
SP3102 Default Dial Plan: Blow-By-Blow Description? (PeteCresswell) UK VOIP 9 02-12-2011 05:14 PM
Firefighters at the site of WTC7 "Move away the building is going to blow up, get back the building is going to blow up." Midex Python 24 05-07-2007 04:23 AM
why why why why why Mr. SweatyFinger ASP .Net 4 12-21-2006 01:15 PM
findcontrol("PlaceHolderPrice") why why why why why why why why why why why Mr. SweatyFinger ASP .Net 2 12-02-2006 03:46 PM
Why does my datagrid.databind blow up? carlor ASP .Net Web Controls 3 10-14-2005 05:49 PM



Advertisments