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HDDVD/Bluray: stillborn or coma

 
 
MassiveProng
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Posts: n/a
 
      01-30-2007
On Mon, 29 Jan 2007 13:28:09 -0800, Gene E. Bloch
<(E-Mail Removed)> Gave us:

>On 1/29/2007, Bill Vermillion posted this:
>
><Paper Reduction Activity>
>
>> Pushing Usenet news around - primarily by UUCP over phones - except
>> for two large local engineering groups who had a 56 line - most of
>> us in the Orlando area moved to Telebit modems that gave us
>> 18Kbit/sec transfer rates [later about 22Kb] long before the
>> first 9600 bps modem was available for sale. Since we all had
>> registered UUCP domain names we got them at 1/2 price at $650 each.
>>
>> The next year I saw my first 9600 BPS modem. From BT [British
>> Telecom] . $5000 US.
>>
>> Bill

>
>Ouch.
>
>Just yesterday, reading the Sunday paper ads, I noticed a 300GB hard
>drive for $80, so in a fit of reminiscence I compared its $/MB to my
>first hard drive: 10 MB, $800.
>
>I came up with a factor 3,000,000, but then I checked my work, and
>realized it was *only* 300,000 (that's the problem with computing in my
>head). This much change in maybe 22 or 24 years.
>
>The performance is improved some too, but not that much



Do not do a disk check on your C drive on an XT!

At least not if you planned on working on it that day.
 
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MassiveProng
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Posts: n/a
 
      01-30-2007
On Mon, 29 Jan 2007 22:15:00 GMT, http://www.velocityreviews.com/forums/(E-Mail Removed) (Bill Vermillion) Gave
us:

>Hm. I've seen many who read the headers and then just download and
>read in real time.



Back then, their groups had ten posts a day. They didn't need to
finger through first.
 
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MassiveProng
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Posts: n/a
 
      01-30-2007
On Mon, 29 Jan 2007 22:15:01 GMT, (E-Mail Removed) (Bill Vermillion) Gave
us:

>
>If we're playing un-upsmanship - my first HD was an 8MB eight-inch
>that I got for $1500 as part of an as-is where-is closeout
>on Radio Shack Model 16's.



HAhahahaha! You ain't real bright... That was back when $1500 was
a LOT OF ****IN' MONEY TOO!

How funny.

They closed you out. Bwuahahahahah!
 
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MassiveProng
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      01-30-2007
On Mon, 29 Jan 2007 22:15:01 GMT, (E-Mail Removed) (Bill Vermillion) Gave
us:

>In article <(E-Mail Removed)>,
>Gene E. Bloch <hamburger@NOT_SPAM.invalid> wrote:
>>On 1/29/2007, Bill Vermillion posted this:
>>
>><Paper Reduction Activity>
>>
>>> Pushing Usenet news around - primarily by UUCP over phones - except
>>> for two large local engineering groups who had a 56 line - most of
>>> us in the Orlando area moved to Telebit modems that gave us
>>> 18Kbit/sec transfer rates [later about 22Kb] long before the
>>> first 9600 bps modem was available for sale. Since we all had
>>> registered UUCP domain names we got them at 1/2 price at $650 each.
>>>
>>> The next year I saw my first 9600 BPS modem. From BT [British
>>> Telecom] . $5000 US.
>>>
>>> Bill

>>
>>Ouch.
>>
>>Just yesterday, reading the Sunday paper ads, I noticed a 300GB hard
>>drive for $80, so in a fit of reminiscence I compared its $/MB to my
>>first hard drive: 10 MB, $800.

>
>If we're playing un-upsmanship - my first HD was an 8MB eight-inch
>that I got for $1500 as part of an as-is where-is closeout
>on Radio Shack Model 16's. It came with Xenix and the kernel
>on the 1.3.? was only about 78K long. And I decided to get the
>full development system - that was $750. But within 6 months it
>had all paid for itself, and I inadvertantly wound up being a
>self-employed SA/HW/SW person - all by accident.
>
>>I came up with a factor 3,000,000, but then I checked my work,
>>and realized it was *only* 300,000 (that's the problem with
>>computing in my head). This much change in maybe 22 or 24 years.

>
>Just fire up 'bc' and be sure of your math. Don't forget to set
>the scale
>
>>The performance is improved some too, but not that much

>
>What do you mean NOT THAT MUCH.
>
>I just moved to another terminal session and logged into a system
>I'm just building up to replace an aging server. With nothing
>extraordinary with a 150Mhz SATA 150GB drive, I just measured
>82MB/sec writing and 80MB reading.
>
>My first ESDI drive [ I misjudged how popular SCSI would become]
>had a 1.5Mhz interface [most cards were 1MHz] so that meant
>on a good day going down hill with the wind at my back I could
>get a bit over 1MB transfer rate on a UFS file system. The old
>S51 file system from AT&T - which I had on the same drive - was at
>least 5 times slower because of the inefficieny of that FS - with
>allocating 2 512 byte sectors at a time instead of 8K allocations.
>
>
>>Gene E. Bloch (Gino)
>>letters617blochg3251
>>(replace the numbers by "at" and "dotcom")

>
>I do not miss the old days - it's too much fun now!
>


The word for today is "GADGETS"
 
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MassiveProng
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Posts: n/a
 
      01-30-2007
On Mon, 29 Jan 2007 14:58:26 -0800, Gene E. Bloch
<(E-Mail Removed)> Gave us:

>On 1/29/2007, Bill Vermillion posted this:
>> In article <(E-Mail Removed)>,
>> Gene E. Bloch <hamburger@NOT_SPAM.invalid> wrote:
>>> On 1/29/2007, Bill Vermillion posted this:
>>>
>>> <Paper Reduction Activity>
>>>
>>>> Pushing Usenet news around - primarily by UUCP over phones - except
>>>> for two large local engineering groups who had a 56 line - most of
>>>> us in the Orlando area moved to Telebit modems that gave us
>>>> 18Kbit/sec transfer rates [later about 22Kb] long before the
>>>> first 9600 bps modem was available for sale. Since we all had
>>>> registered UUCP domain names we got them at 1/2 price at $650 each.
>>>>
>>>> The next year I saw my first 9600 BPS modem. From BT [British
>>>> Telecom] . $5000 US.
>>>>
>>>> Bill
>>>
>>> Ouch.
>>>
>>> Just yesterday, reading the Sunday paper ads, I noticed a 300GB hard
>>> drive for $80, so in a fit of reminiscence I compared its $/MB to my
>>> first hard drive: 10 MB, $800.

>>
>> If we're playing un-upsmanship - my first HD was an 8MB eight-inch
>> that I got for $1500 as part of an as-is where-is closeout
>> on Radio Shack Model 16's. It came with Xenix and the kernel
>> on the 1.3.? was only about 78K long. And I decided to get the
>> full development system - that was $750. But within 6 months it
>> had all paid for itself, and I inadvertantly wound up being a
>> self-employed SA/HW/SW person - all by accident.
>>
>>> I came up with a factor 3,000,000, but then I checked my work,
>>> and realized it was *only* 300,000 (that's the problem with
>>> computing in my head). This much change in maybe 22 or 24 years.

>>
>> Just fire up 'bc' and be sure of your math. Don't forget to set
>> the scale
>>
>>> The performance is improved some too, but not that much

>>
>> What do you mean NOT THAT MUCH.
>>
>> I just moved to another terminal session and logged into a system
>> I'm just building up to replace an aging server. With nothing
>> extraordinary with a 150Mhz SATA 150GB drive, I just measured
>> 82MB/sec writing and 80MB reading.
>>
>> My first ESDI drive [ I misjudged how popular SCSI would become]
>> had a 1.5Mhz interface [most cards were 1MHz] so that meant
>> on a good day going down hill with the wind at my back I could
>> get a bit over 1MB transfer rate on a UFS file system. The old
>> S51 file system from AT&T - which I had on the same drive - was at
>> least 5 times slower because of the inefficieny of that FS - with
>> allocating 2 512 byte sectors at a time instead of 8K allocations.
>>
>>
>>> Gene E. Bloch (Gino)
>>> letters617blochg3251
>>> (replace the numbers by "at" and "dotcom")

>>
>> I do not miss the old days - it's too much fun now!
>>
>> Bill

>
>But without the old days, how could we reminisce? Not to mention play
>"un-upsmanship"
>
>And we could tell our grandchildren that we walked about three miles to
>school in the snow, and it was uphill both ways, and we didn't even
>have an iPod to listen to on the way, and there was no TV, and ...


And there were tongue tips stuck to all the steel street light poles
all along the way to school. :-]

My dad did walk about 2 miles a day to school... one way.
Back in the 40s... Only uphill in one direction though.
 
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Tim Smith
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      01-30-2007
In article <(E-Mail Removed)>, (E-Mail Removed) (Bill Vermillion) wrote:

> In article <(E-Mail Removed)>,
> MassiveProng <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
> >Some dipshit wrote:
> >
> >>> IIRC, before around 1985, people tended to top post. It makes
> >>> reading a thread much easier when you are stuck with a s-l-o-w text-
> >>> mode newsreader on a s-l-o-w connection - which is pretty much all
> >>> there was back then.

>
> > No. One DOWNLOADS posts, then reads, dumbass (at least if you have
> >half a brain). ANY of you idiots that actually tried to read as it
> >downloaded were even more stupid that the top postingf twits with
> >their top posted twit mentalities.

>
> Not always true. One of our first local feeds was running
> on a MicroVAX - and you could read as they scrolled, or mark
> the messages and save them there, and then download them if you
> wanted to archive them. But that was in the days when 1200 bps
> was about the top speed and it was fairly easy to read at that
> speed.


Also, keep in mind that in 1985, usenet propagation was quite a bit
different. It was a peer-to-peer system, and most of the peer links
were UUCP connections over dial-up, and often they were not on demand.

For example, one of the major links between Southern California and
Silicon Valley then was a UUCP link between Callan Data Systems (where I
worked at the time), and...I forget who in Silicon Valley. This was a
dial-up that occurred once a day in the early morning, when phone rates
were cheap.

A usenet post could take several days or longer to propagate throughout
usenet. Someone reading your response to a post might have never seen
the original (sites often had short expire times, or the original might
not yet have arrived). Top posting was extremely annoying in such an
environment. The only style that worked well was to trim the original
down to just what is needed to make your comments make sense, and put
your comments right after the things they are in response to.

For all the youngsters reading this who are thinking "my God, that's
primitive", email was even worse back then. Here are my email addresses
from my usenet signature in late 1985:

* ihnp4!cithep!tim
* ima!ism780!ism780b!tim

Those are routes. That first one is saying that I was "tim" on cithep,
and that cithep had a connection to ihnp4. So, if you could find a
route that would get your mail to ihnp4, you could get it to me. The
second says that I was tim on ism780b, which was connected to ism780,
which was connection to ima.

ima and ihnp4 were well-known sites with high connectivity, so you'd
learn a route from your site to them. So if someone at, say, kremvax,
wanted to send me mail, they might know that kremvax talks to decvax,
and decvax talks to ihnp4, so they could address the mail this way:

decvax!ihnp4!cithep!tim

and it would reach me, eventually.

--
--Tim Smith
 
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Bill Vermillion
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      01-30-2007
In article <(E-Mail Removed)>,
MassiveProng <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
>On Mon, 29 Jan 2007 22:15:01 GMT, (E-Mail Removed) (Bill Vermillion) Gave
>us:
>
>>
>>If we're playing un-upsmanship - my first HD was an 8MB eight-inch
>>that I got for $1500 as part of an as-is where-is closeout
>>on Radio Shack Model 16's.

>
>
> HAhahahaha! You ain't real bright... That was back when $1500 was
>a LOT OF ****IN' MONEY TOO!


Yup is surely was.

> How funny.


> They closed you out. Bwuahahahahah!


And the investment in that unit - about $1500 for the drive and
$1500 for the computer was paid back in under 4 months as I got
business getting SW running for people when the techs at the
Shack said "you'll have to reformat it and start over".

Gawd what dweebs - but it made me a bit of money making things work
- and I even salvaged a customers system for them as they put me
in the back room as I worked on it at their store. Made some good
money on that - and it saved them from having to take a system
back under their 30 day no questions asked policy. After that I
got a lot of respect from the manager - who used to ignore me
because my beard and longish hair.

But the money was nice.

Bill
--
Bill Vermillion - bv @ wjv . com
 
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Bill Vermillion
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      01-30-2007
In article <(E-Mail Removed)>,
MassiveProng <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
>On Mon, 29 Jan 2007 13:28:09 -0800, Gene E. Bloch
><(E-Mail Removed)> Gave us:
>
>>On 1/29/2007, Bill Vermillion posted this:
>>
>><Paper Reduction Activity>
>>
>>> Pushing Usenet news around - primarily by UUCP over phones - except
>>> for two large local engineering groups who had a 56 line - most of
>>> us in the Orlando area moved to Telebit modems that gave us
>>> 18Kbit/sec transfer rates [later about 22Kb] long before the
>>> first 9600 bps modem was available for sale. Since we all had
>>> registered UUCP domain names we got them at 1/2 price at $650 each.
>>>
>>> The next year I saw my first 9600 BPS modem. From BT [British
>>> Telecom] . $5000 US.
>>>
>>> Bill

>>
>>Ouch.
>>
>>Just yesterday, reading the Sunday paper ads, I noticed a 300GB hard
>>drive for $80, so in a fit of reminiscence I compared its $/MB to my
>>first hard drive: 10 MB, $800.
>>
>>I came up with a factor 3,000,000, but then I checked my work, and
>>realized it was *only* 300,000 (that's the problem with computing in my
>>head). This much change in maybe 22 or 24 years.
>>
>>The performance is improved some too, but not that much

>
>
> Do not do a disk check on your C drive on an XT!


> At least not if you planned on working on it that day.


I gave us MS for all but a few things back in 1983 when I moved
the the *n*x world. I use XP for a couple of things that only work
there - such as the software for an external video device - things
like that.

The MS file systems were a pain to recover. But it was amazing
what you could do with the correct tools.

Bill

--
Bill Vermillion - bv @ wjv . com
 
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Bill Vermillion
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Posts: n/a
 
      01-30-2007
In article <(E-Mail Removed)>,
MassiveProng <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
>On Mon, 29 Jan 2007 18:35:01 GMT, (E-Mail Removed) (Bill Vermillion) Gave
>us:
>
>> Which was several months after the first LD players went
>>on sale in Atlanta - the only place they were available.

>
>
> Check the date on the release of the Dragon's Lair upright video
>game.
>
>http://www.djgallagher.com/games/cla...ir/history.php
>
> It contained an "addressable" version of the Magnavox player.
>
> Computer interface was serial port, and the player got a decision
>based gaming experience via fast track addressing on a CAV DISC.


> The year was 1983.


That was the year I worked on what turned out to be the world's
first interactive electronics parts catalog. What was for
the Westinhouse Steam Turbine division. They never used it
but it wound up in their bus manufacturing division.

The LD player was a Sony 1000 - which wasn't compatible with
something on the Pioneers. I think it was a chapter stop. I ROM
upgrade made it compatible. It also was driven by a serial
interface.

We drove that with a Sony CP/M computer using the Laserdisk
extensions for BASIC. The Sony computer had a very small vertical
height and had a 3.5" floppy drive in it - and we were using this
about 3 months before the Mac debuted with the ads during the
Superbowl - which made most people think that Apple had the first
computeres with 3.5" drives.

And we basically servoed two machine together over a serial link -
with the final install being over modems.

A client could be looking for something, and if they could not
figure it out, they'd pick up a phone which was on a ring-down
circuit that would connect to the support in Orlando.

The far side modem would also dial the one in Orlando and it was
pass the frame it was on the the laser player in Orlando so
the support could see exactly what the customer was doing.

Then the support could change the display by going to a different
frame on his machine, and the machine in the far city would
read the information and sync to the Orlando machine.

That was a fun project. I never made so much money in such a short
time in my life. I was called in by an outside consulting firm,
and we picked up the project 2 weeks before it was to be finished.

The interal people working on it for a few months had only gotten
about 10% of the job done.

So it was about two weeks of 18 hour days, and when we turned it
over to them 2 hours before showtime we had 99% of the system
implemented.

The ONLY thing not implemented was the sensor in the chair so that
when a person sat down the track on the LD would say "Good morning,
good afternoon, or good evening".

It did say that on startup - but without the automatic chair
sensor.

The person who was mastering the video disks - with one of the few
authoring sites in the South - also had his crew modifying the
Sony rear projection TV sets that were used in the display so
we could have computer output and video output on the screen at the
same time. That's pretty common now, but required card
modifications in those days. Of course he had a big video facility
and even had a Rank Cintel film to video transfer unit - as he did
a lot of work for the military making instructional video disks and
used the Rank for transfering film for those venuse, as well as
commercial work.

My first new LD player had a model number that >I think< was
a PR-1829. Semi-industrial. Top loading. And with a gas laser
instead of the solid state devices that came later. I'm not really
sure of that number as it's been over 20 years ago.

Bill
--
Bill Vermillion - bv @ wjv . com
 
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Bill Vermillion
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      01-30-2007
In article <(E-Mail Removed)>,
MassiveProng <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
>On Mon, 29 Jan 2007 17:55:01 GMT, (E-Mail Removed) (Bill Vermillion) Gave
>us:
>
>>In article <(E-Mail Removed)>,
>>Joshua Zyber <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
>>>"Bill Vermillion" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
>>>news:(E-Mail Removed)...
>>>> And just this morning I got the latest CED digest
>>>
>>>The latest CED digest?

>>
>>Yup! Try http://www.cedmagic.com
>>
>>It has links/info on parts and how to fix old players, and people
>>selling disks for those who collect old electronics and simllar
>>antiquities.
>>
>>Tom has been running this list since the days when you could still
>>buy new CED players. [I have a couple I need to replace the belts
>>on, also need to put a new power supply in an Pioneer 8000 LD
>>player, and swap out a drive in a DVD recorder].
>>
>>You have to watch out when I have BOTH a screwdriver and soldering
>>iron
>>
>>Bill


> Somehow, I see the cowardly lion saying "Ain't it the truth?".


And George Morrow - Morrow computers and I think later Godbout used
to say "Never trust a programmer with a screwdriver".

But I did manage to keep a recording studio running quite well.
And I truly loved working on the Studer A-800. Truly designed for
easy maintenance. When a power transistor went on one of the power
supplys the steps to fix it were this.

Undo the twist fastener holding the PS in place.
Pull it straight out.
Take the supplied allen hex 'screwdriver' and unscrew the screws
holding the transistor.
Plug in a new transistor.
Screw it down.
Replace the power supply and lock it in place.

It would take less than 1/2 hour even if you were slow.
It was a true marvel of Swiss engineering.

Bill

--
Bill Vermillion - bv @ wjv . com
 
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