Velocity Reviews - Computer Hardware Reviews

Velocity Reviews > Newsgroups > Computing > DVD Video > DeepDiscountDVD.com: Anybody Else Finds a High Percentage of Defective?

Reply
Thread Tools

DeepDiscountDVD.com: Anybody Else Finds a High Percentage of Defective?

 
 
Stan Brown
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      12-01-2006
Thu, 30 Nov 2006 08:01:50 -0500 from Jaime M. de Castellvi
<(E-Mail Removed)>:
> Talk about your built-in obsolence. Most VCR players used to last a
> lot longer than three years.


I paid almost $80 for a JVC unit in March, and last week the on-
screen menu stopped working. I can no longer set timed recordings,
and if there's ever a power failure I'll no longer even be able to
renew the VCR's setup.

Meanwhile my Hitachi unit from 1994 is still going strong.

--
Stan Brown, Oak Road Systems, Tompkins County, New York, USA
http://OakRoadSystems.com/
DVD FAQ: http://dvddemystified.com/dvdfaq.html
other FAQs: http://oakroadsystems.com/genl/faqget.htm
 
Reply With Quote
 
 
 
 
Stan Brown
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      12-01-2006
Wed, 29 Nov 2006 12:17:01 -0800 from dgates
<(E-Mail Removed)>:
> At our house, we almost always have a few DVDs lying around on shelves
> -- both commercial DVDs and home-burned DVD+RW's. How seriously
> should we consider an emergency change in our DVD-handling policy?


I don't get it. When the cases are possibly safer and certainly no
less safe, and putting them in the cases reduces clutter, why would
anyone ever *not* put them in the cases?

--
Stan Brown, Oak Road Systems, Tompkins County, New York, USA
http://OakRoadSystems.com/
DVD FAQ: http://dvddemystified.com/dvdfaq.html
other FAQs: http://oakroadsystems.com/genl/faqget.htm
 
Reply With Quote
 
 
 
 
Arthur Engh
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      12-01-2006
>> I got curious with all the praise and went there to check out prices.
>> Opera 9.02 comes straight up with a warning:
>> "scripts.affiliatefuture.com"
>> - The server is using a short public encryption key which is considered
>> insecure

>
> Deep Discount DVD, located at www.deepdiscountdvd.com, uses 256 bit
> encryption


www.deepdiscountdvd.com uses:

Certificate name
scripts.affiliatefuture.com
Details
Connection : TLS v1.0 128 bit ARC4 (RSA/MD5)
The server is using a short public encryption key, which is considered
insecure.

--
Using Opera's revolutionary e-mail client: http://www.opera.com/mail/
 
Reply With Quote
 
JoeBloe
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      12-01-2006
On Thu, 30 Nov 2006 08:01:50 -0500, Jaime M. de Castellvi
<(E-Mail Removed)> Gave us:

>On Wed, 29 Nov 2006 21:44:36 -0800, JoeBloe
><(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
>
>>On Wed, 29 Nov 2006 21:03:40 -0500, Jaime M. de Castellvi
>><(E-Mail Removed)> Gave us:
>>
>>> I have no choice but to
>>>conclude that the player is the thing.
>>>
>>>Short-term fix (hopefully)? I just got myself one of those head/lens
>>>cleaning disk, we'll see if it does any good.

>>
>> Try taking a known "failed" disc. Place it in the player, and turn
>>the player upside down and see if the freeze occurs.
>>
>> Heads can "sag". A three year old player is getting up there, and a
>>combo player likely doesn't have their best transport mech in it.

>
>Talk about your built-in obsolence. Most VCR players used to last a
>lot longer than three years. Geez.
>
>> If it does play upside down, its the player. Not broken, just out
>>of calibration.

>
>There used to be a time when one would call the VCR repair man or
>would bring the machine down to his shop. Warranty once expired
>nowadays, even for something as minor as out of calibration, it is
>almost cheaper and easier to just get a new machine. Oh well, it
>keeps the Chinese gainfully employed.
>
>Cheers,
>
>Jaime



Exactly. The low end are like wrist watches. Cheaper to get
another than repair costs.

The high is not that way, however. Fixing is still cheaper on the
high end stuff. Mine was nearly $1000.
 
Reply With Quote
 
JoeBloe
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      12-01-2006
On Thu, 30 Nov 2006 08:55:46 -0500, Kimba W. Lion <KimbaWLion> Gave
us:

> A quick wash under the faucet with some liquid hand soap
>followed by pat-drying with a soft cloth towel cleans them up very nicely.



Actually, the dish soap or hand soap IS the best way, however, I
would use very well cleaned fingertips as opposed to a towel of any
kind. Your fingers do the job, but are not comprised of fibers or
media harder than the plastic itself. Wash hands well in hot water
for a good couple minutes, and then rub the disc ONLY from center to
edge, rinsing it with hot water (bought discs, not burned) and sling
off the excess water and DAB dry with an absorbent cloth towel.

My discs that I have ever cleaned (12" Laser discs) still look new
and never rubbed by anything using the hands only method. I have
never had a dirty DVD yet. They stay in their cases when not in use.
It's that simple for me.
 
Reply With Quote
 
E. Barry Bruyea
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      12-01-2006
On Thu, 30 Nov 2006 08:55:46 -0500, Kimba W. Lion <KimbaWLion> wrote:

>JoeBloe <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
>
>>>Specifically, if you don't have any special DVD-cleaning products,
>>>you're going to squirt Windex onto a paper towel and use that to wipe
>>>outwards on the bottom of the DVD... right?

>>
>> Abso-****in-lutely not!
>>
>> Alcohol based cleaners are a no go for plastic, especially when used
>>in conjunction with a "towel".

>
>Actually the main ingredient in most varieties of window cleaner is
>amonia, and that is far more dangerous to most plastics than alcohol.
>
>Nearly every rental disc I've seen looks like someone used it under a pile
>of fried chicken. A quick wash under the faucet with some liquid hand soap
>followed by pat-drying with a soft cloth towel cleans them up very nicely.



I agree, after trying many methods to clean rental disks, warm water,
liquid soap and light touch drying works the best, even the ones that
come with peanut butter & jelly.

 
Reply With Quote
 
Justin
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      12-01-2006
Arthur Engh wrote on [Fri, 01 Dec 2006 19:28:04 +0800]:
>>> I got curious with all the praise and went there to check out prices.
>>> Opera 9.02 comes straight up with a warning:
>>> "scripts.affiliatefuture.com"
>>> - The server is using a short public encryption key which is considered
>>> insecure

>>
>> Deep Discount DVD, located at www.deepdiscountdvd.com, uses 256 bit
>> encryption

>
> www.deepdiscountdvd.com uses:
>
> Certificate name
> scripts.affiliatefuture.com
> Details
> Connection : TLS v1.0 128 bit ARC4 (RSA/MD5)
> The server is using a short public encryption key, which is considered
> insecure.


Pay closer attention.

certificate name
secure.deepdiscountdvd.com
Connection Encrypted: High-grade encryption (AES-256 256 bit)

The scripts.afficilatefuture.com is a different site altogether
 
Reply With Quote
 
dgates
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      12-01-2006
On Fri, 1 Dec 2006 03:53:35 -0500, Stan Brown
<(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:

>Wed, 29 Nov 2006 12:17:01 -0800 from dgates
><(E-Mail Removed)>:
>> At our house, we almost always have a few DVDs lying around on shelves
>> -- both commercial DVDs and home-burned DVD+RW's. How seriously
>> should we consider an emergency change in our DVD-handling policy?

>
>I don't get it. When the cases are possibly safer and certainly no
>less safe, and putting them in the cases reduces clutter, why would
>anyone ever *not* put them in the cases?



Well, there's no good answer to that. It's like asking "Why not
always wash dishes immediately after using them? Why ever leave them
in the sink for a while?"

The basic answer has to be: If it's harmless to leave the DVD out, why
not? Why not form a stack of 5 or 10, then put them all away at once
later? Of course, that's "IF it's harmless..."

The real question is: How do you convince people (who don't seem to be
noticing any problems from leaving DVDs out) to always put them away
immediately? (even if it means delaying their instant gratification
while they possibly, gasp, travel to another room to find the correct
case for it?
 
Reply With Quote
 
Jaime M. de Castellvi
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      12-01-2006
On Fri, 01 Dec 2006 04:30:49 -0800, JoeBloe
<(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:

>On Thu, 30 Nov 2006 08:01:50 -0500, Jaime M. de Castellvi
><(E-Mail Removed)> Gave us:
>
>>On Wed, 29 Nov 2006 21:44:36 -0800, JoeBloe
>><(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
>>
>>>On Wed, 29 Nov 2006 21:03:40 -0500, Jaime M. de Castellvi
>>><(E-Mail Removed)> Gave us:
>>>
>>>> I have no choice but to
>>>>conclude that the player is the thing.
>>>>
>>>>Short-term fix (hopefully)? I just got myself one of those head/lens
>>>>cleaning disk, we'll see if it does any good.
>>>
>>> Try taking a known "failed" disc. Place it in the player, and turn
>>>the player upside down and see if the freeze occurs.
>>>
>>> Heads can "sag". A three year old player is getting up there, and a
>>>combo player likely doesn't have their best transport mech in it.

>>
>>Talk about your built-in obsolence. Most VCR players used to last a
>>lot longer than three years. Geez.
>>
>>> If it does play upside down, its the player. Not broken, just out
>>>of calibration.

>>
>>There used to be a time when one would call the VCR repair man or
>>would bring the machine down to his shop. Warranty once expired
>>nowadays, even for something as minor as out of calibration, it is
>>almost cheaper and easier to just get a new machine. Oh well, it
>>keeps the Chinese gainfully employed.
>>
>>Cheers,
>>
>>Jaime

>
>
> Exactly. The low end are like wrist watches. Cheaper to get
>another than repair costs.
>
> The high is not that way, however. Fixing is still cheaper on the
>high end stuff. Mine was nearly $1000.


You talk about your woman... I wish you could see mine : )

Cheers,

Jaime
 
Reply With Quote
 
Derek Janssen
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      12-01-2006
dgates wrote:

>>>At our house, we almost always have a few DVDs lying around on shelves
>>>-- both commercial DVDs and home-burned DVD+RW's. How seriously
>>>should we consider an emergency change in our DVD-handling policy?

>>
>>I don't get it. When the cases are possibly safer and certainly no
>>less safe, and putting them in the cases reduces clutter, why would
>>anyone ever *not* put them in the cases?

>
> Well, there's no good answer to that. It's like asking "Why not
> always wash dishes immediately after using them? Why ever leave them
> in the sink for a while?"


Answer: Because dishes are ceramic--ie., STONE--or hard plastic, and
don't have complex binary sequences micro-etched into them with laser,
containing expensive commentaries and featurettes.

And because if you put a DVD in the dishwasher, water spots would be the
*least* of your problems...

Derek Janssen (and that's even if you DO use Cascade, with fresh lemony
rinse!)
http://www.velocityreviews.com/forums/(E-Mail Removed)
 
Reply With Quote
 
 
 
Reply

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
As a percentage of world inhabitants, the white population willplummet to a single digit (9.76%) by 2060 from a high-water mark of 27.98% in1950 tg DVD Video 3 10-02-2008 09:02 AM
FF 1.5 refuses to start, anybody else? Greger Firefox 0 01-24-2006 10:09 AM
Discount-Hosting: Anybody else have billing problems? Tina - AxisHOST, Inc. HTML 2 07-06-2005 04:20 AM
Anybody Else Burned By Internic/Verisign? (Pete Cresswell) HTML 0 04-05-2005 11:08 PM
Anybody else having any ntl email problems? Broons Bane Computer Support 14 09-27-2004 03:19 PM



Advertisments