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dropping packets to distrupt voip?

 
 
Ken Williams
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      12-01-2006
I use voip. my ISP has financial incentive to make me stop. since they
can't stop me by blocking ports, they instead randomly drop packets. so
my pings anywhere in the world have a time out every 1-2 seconds.

the point of this is to make the VOIP unusable, but it still doesn't
really effect email and the web.

anyone ever hear about this? how can I get by it? is this common? is
this an actual scenario?

I'm interested in any comments.

http://www.velocityreviews.com/forums/(E-Mail Removed)
 
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tkd
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      12-02-2006
>I use voip. my ISP has financial incentive to make me stop. since they
>can't stop me by blocking ports, they instead randomly drop packets. so my
>pings anywhere in the world have a time out every 1-2 seconds.
>
> the point of this is to make the VOIP unusable, but it still doesn't
> really effect email and the web.
>
> anyone ever hear about this? how can I get by it? is this common? is
> this an actual scenario?
>
> I'm interested in any comments.


I experienced the problem you describe when I switched to BT ADSL max. I am
more minded to believe it is a fault than a conspiracy, although BT denied
there was anything wrong. I changed ISP (and no longer uses DSL max) and I
no longer have this problem. It was very frustrating talking to BT's
customer service buffoons who really didn't understand what I was talking
about, but in the end they released me from my contract 10 months early so
in that way I guess they acknowledged there is a problem.


 
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Nick
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      12-02-2006

"Ken Williams" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
news:0C1ch.18739$(E-Mail Removed)...
> I use voip. my ISP has financial incentive to make me stop. since they
> can't stop me by blocking ports, they instead randomly drop packets. so
> my pings anywhere in the world have a time out every 1-2 seconds.
>
> the point of this is to make the VOIP unusable, but it still doesn't
> really effect email and the web.
>
> anyone ever hear about this? how can I get by it? is this common? is
> this an actual scenario?
>
> I'm interested in any comments.
>
> (E-Mail Removed)


If your ISP is NTL/Telewest, it might be your cable modem that's faulty.


 
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Graham
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      12-02-2006

"Nick" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
news:Lcbch.3094$(E-Mail Removed)...
>
> "Ken Williams" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
> news:0C1ch.18739$(E-Mail Removed)...
>> I use voip. my ISP has financial incentive to make me stop. since they
>> can't stop me by blocking ports, they instead randomly drop packets. so
>> my pings anywhere in the world have a time out every 1-2 seconds.
>>
>> the point of this is to make the VOIP unusable, but it still doesn't
>> really effect email and the web.
>>
>> anyone ever hear about this? how can I get by it? is this common? is
>> this an actual scenario?
>>
>> I'm interested in any comments.
>>
>> (E-Mail Removed)

>
> If your ISP is NTL/Telewest, it might be your cable modem that's faulty.



He appears to be in Canada and is using Cogeco Cable.
Perhaps he is posting here to get a wider perspective of
his (perceived) problem.

--

Graham.
%Profound_observation%


 
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Jungle Boy
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      12-02-2006
Try testing your MTU using the command line 'ping' command.

Assuming your PC and router are initially set to the default of 1500
run the command "ping -f -l 14nn www.yahoo.com"

Increment the values of nn starting from 00 in step of 10 until the
ping fails and then back off in steps of 1 until the ping is successful.

The value is likely to be 1430, 1464, 1472 or something else.

Then add 28 to this value giving 1458, 1492, 1500 or something else less than 1500.

If you're running a VPN (unlikely) then subtract 32.
If AOL is your ISP then the MTU is probably 1400.

If the final value is less than 1500 use the DrTCP utility
(from http://www.dslreports.com/drtcp or the Mac equivalent)
to set the MTU of the LAN or WiFi connection on your PC.
You'll need to disable and re-enabled the LAN/WiFi for the changes to take effect.

If you have a laptop which is connected to other ISP's then fixing the MTU
factor in the laptop might cause the connection to fail with these other ISP's.

You should be able to set the MTU in your router as well. But beware that
the equipment at the exchange and at the ISP can change causing the MTU to
require re-tuning. Setting the MTU in some routers can cause the connection
to fail when the MTU changes at the ISP or exhange.

Hope this helps.
Jungle Boy


 
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Christof Meerwald
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      12-02-2006
On Sat, 2 Dec 2006 11:47:15 -0000, Jungle Boy wrote:
> Try testing your MTU using the command line 'ping' command.


But I fail to see how the MTU could affect VoIP traffic. At least SIP/RTP
usually uses quite small UDP packets anyway, so the MTU setting won't make
any difference here.


Christof

--
http://cmeerw.org sip:cmeerw at cmeerw.org
mailto:cmeerw at cmeerw.org xmpp:cmeerw at cmeerw.org
 
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Tim Bray
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      12-02-2006
Nick wrote:
> If your ISP is NTL/Telewest, it might be your cable modem that's faulty.
>


The original post is in America, but the same could apply.


Even a faulty ethernet cable can cause a bit of packet loss.

Tim

 
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Joe Harrison
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      12-02-2006
I can't see them doing this, unless in conjunction with some method of
ensuring that they only dropped packets containing information relevant to
your VOIP call.

If they just randomly dropped stuff then OK your surfing session might not
notice but online gamers would have the shits, the fits, and the blind
staggers. I'm more with the likelihood of fault somewhere.


 
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Thomas Kenyon
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      12-03-2006
Joe Harrison wrote:
> I can't see them doing this, unless in conjunction with some method of
> ensuring that they only dropped packets containing information relevant to
> your VOIP call.
>
> If they just randomly dropped stuff then OK your surfing session might not
> notice but online gamers would have the shits, the fits, and the blind
> staggers. I'm more with the likelihood of fault somewhere.
>
>

It's tricky, but I know how to do this with Skype (don't tell fon). I'd
need to think about this if I was trying to statefully inspect the data
in a packet to determine that it was voip traffic and not traffic from
an online game etc.

 
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