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Whats the best way to send a HTML email in Outlook?

 
 
Towner
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      11-05-2006
Whats the best way to send a HTML email in Outlook?


 
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cwdjrxyz
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      11-05-2006

Towner wrote:
> Whats the best way to send a HTML email in Outlook?


Why bother with Outlook?. Just get a free Yahoo mail account. It is
very easy to send an html attachment with it. How many people will open
such an attachment is uncertain. I usually will not, unless I am
expecting it and it comes from a very reliable source and it is first
virus scanned before it is downloaded. If you use Yahoo mail or pop
other mail there, it will automatically virus scan all attachments
before it will open them. Likely other mail services can do much the
same.

 
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Nico Schuyt
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      11-06-2006
Towner wrote:
> Whats the best way to send a HTML email in Outlook?


Create a webpage and place the URL as a link in the e-mail. More guarantee
that your information is shown as intended and less irritation on the side
of the receiver.

--
Nico Schuyt
http://www.nicoschuyt.nl/



 
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dorayme
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      11-06-2006
In article <454eec05$0$77487$(E-Mail Removed)>,
"Nico Schuyt" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:

> Towner wrote:
> > Whats the best way to send a HTML email in Outlook?

>
> Create a webpage and place the URL as a link in the e-mail. More guarantee
> that your information is shown as intended and less irritation on the side
> of the receiver.


Yes, for many purposes this is very sound advice.

I guess, though, some companies like to send all their emails
with their logos and other banners... a not unreasonable thing to
want?

--
dorayme
 
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Nico Schuyt
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      11-06-2006
dorayme wrote:
> "Nico Schuyt" wrote:
>> Towner wrote:


>>> Whats the best way to send a HTML email in Outlook?


>> Create a webpage and place the URL as a link in the e-mail. More
>> guarantee that your information is shown as intended and less
>> irritation on the side of the receiver.


> Yes, for many purposes this is very sound advice.


> I guess, though, some companies like to send all their emails
> with their logos and other banners... a not unreasonable thing to
> want?


I agree on that. I send HTML-mailings every month
Of course only to subscribers and with a proper text-equivalent and embedded
images to avoid the warnings in Outlook.
Never heard anyone complain and no one seems to filter on HTML email

--
Nico Schuyt
http://www.nicoschuyt.nl/


 
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Jukka K. Korpela
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      11-06-2006
Scripsit Nico Schuyt:

>> I guess, though, some companies like to send all their emails
>> with their logos and other banners... a not unreasonable thing to
>> want?

>
> I agree on that. I send HTML-mailings every month


Surely customers just love logos and banners, especially when using, say, a
slow connection like GSM. They can't wait to see the fancy images and kewl
formatting, which helps them to ignore the (excuse for) content.

> Of course only to subscribers and with a proper text-equivalent and
> embedded images to avoid the warnings in Outlook.


If you had a case where it would be reasonable to send HTML email, then you
should not include any "proper text-equivalent", since a user would get HTML
email if and only if he explicitly asked for it when, say, subscribing to a
newsletter.

> Never heard anyone complain and no one seems to filter on HTML email
>


Irony has become impossible, so I won't even ask whether you wrote
ironically or not. The emoticon "" currently means just "I'm laughing at
my own joke, or at something, or someone".

--
Jukka K. Korpela ("Yucca")
http://www.cs.tut.fi/~jkorpela/

 
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Nico Schuyt
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      11-06-2006
Jukka K. Korpela wrote:
> Scripsit Nico Schuyt:


>>> I guess, though, some companies like to send all their emails
>>> with their logos and other banners... a not unreasonable thing to
>>> want?


>> I agree on that. I send HTML-mailings every month


> Surely customers just love logos and banners, especially when using,
> say, a slow connection like GSM. They can't wait to see the fancy
> images and kewl formatting, which helps them to ignore the (excuse
> for) content.


>> Of course only to subscribers and with a proper text-equivalent and
>> embedded images to avoid the warnings in Outlook.


> If you had a case where it would be reasonable to send HTML email,
> then you should not include any "proper text-equivalent", since a
> user would get HTML email if and only if he explicitly asked for it
> when, say, subscribing to a newsletter.


The user is not informed that the newsletter will be in HTML. With a
text-equivalent there's no problem I think for those who don't like
HTML-mail (except for a tiny little bit of bandwidth)

>> Never heard anyone complain and no one seems to filter on HTML email
>>


> Irony has become impossible,


No irony from my side. Maybe amused.

> so I won't even ask whether you wrote
> ironically or not. The emoticon "" currently means just "I'm
> laughing at my own joke, or at something, or someone".


At least two of the options are appropriate. Smiling however, not laughing.

The smiley stands for: Almost everyone in this groups advices against
HTML-mail (that's why my suggestion to the OP was to use a link to a web
page). In real life the disadvantages seem to be less dramatic. (But I feel
guilty every time I press the send button

--
Nico Schuyt
http://www.nicoschuyt.nl/


 
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cwdjrxyz
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      11-06-2006

Nico Schuyt wrote:
> dorayme wrote:
> > "Nico Schuyt" wrote:
> >> Towner wrote:

>
> >>> Whats the best way to send a HTML email in Outlook?

>
> >> Create a webpage and place the URL as a link in the e-mail. More
> >> guarantee that your information is shown as intended and less
> >> irritation on the side of the receiver.

>
> > Yes, for many purposes this is very sound advice.

>
> > I guess, though, some companies like to send all their emails
> > with their logos and other banners... a not unreasonable thing to
> > want?

>
> I agree on that. I send HTML-mailings every month
> Of course only to subscribers and with a proper text-equivalent and embedded
> images to avoid the warnings in Outlook.
> Never heard anyone complain and no one seems to filter on HTML email



I receive the New York Times free email news edition everyday. You
first have to sign up to receive this. Then you have to select for a
text or html version. I selected the html version, because of some of
the pictures that add to some news stories, and I have an about 6 Mbps
download connection. Some on dialup would want the text version, as
this is a large download even without pictures. The key here is that
emails are sent only to those who ask for them and you are given a
choice of text or html. There is even a link on the html version to
select the text version for an individuual email if you have trouble.
Several other responsible news sources and such for which pictures can
sometimes be of benefit use this method.

 
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Nico Schuyt
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      11-06-2006
cwdjrxyz wrote:
> Nico Schuyt wrote:
>> dorayme wrote:


>>> I guess, though, some companies like to send all their emails
>>> with their logos and other banners... a not unreasonable thing to
>>> want?


>> I agree on that. I send HTML-mailings every month
>> Of course only to subscribers and with a proper text-equivalent and
>> embedded images to avoid the warnings in Outlook.
>> Never heard anyone complain and no one seems to filter on HTML email
>>


> I receive the New York Times free email news edition everyday. You
> first have to sign up to receive this. Then you have to select for a
> text or html version.


Problem is maybe that most people don't know what the difference is between
HTML- and text email.

> I selected the html version, because of some of
> the pictures that add to some news stories, and I have an about 6 Mbps
> download connection. Some on dialup would want the text version, as
> this is a large download even without pictures. The key here is that
> emails are sent only to those who ask for them and you are given a
> choice of text or html. There is even a link on the html version to
> select the text version for an individuual email if you have trouble.
> Several other responsible news sources and such for which pictures can
> sometimes be of benefit use this method.


In situations like this (lots of text and images), I should only supply a
link to a page on a website.

--
Nico Schuyt
http://www.nicoschuyt.nl/


 
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cwdjrxyz
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      11-06-2006

Nico Schuyt wrote:
> cwdjrxyz wrote:
> > Nico Schuyt wrote:
> >> dorayme wrote:

>
> >>> I guess, though, some companies like to send all their emails
> >>> with their logos and other banners... a not unreasonable thing to
> >>> want?

>
> >> I agree on that. I send HTML-mailings every month
> >> Of course only to subscribers and with a proper text-equivalent and
> >> embedded images to avoid the warnings in Outlook.
> >> Never heard anyone complain and no one seems to filter on HTML email
> >>

>
> > I receive the New York Times free email news edition everyday. You
> > first have to sign up to receive this. Then you have to select for a
> > text or html version.

>
> Problem is maybe that most people don't know what the difference is between
> HTML- and text email.
>
> > I selected the html version, because of some of
> > the pictures that add to some news stories, and I have an about 6 Mbps
> > download connection. Some on dialup would want the text version, as
> > this is a large download even without pictures. The key here is that
> > emails are sent only to those who ask for them and you are given a
> > choice of text or html. There is even a link on the html version to
> > select the text version for an individuual email if you have trouble.
> > Several other responsible news sources and such for which pictures can
> > sometimes be of benefit use this method.

>
> In situations like this (lots of text and images), I should only supply a
> link to a page on a website.


The NY Times has a general web page at http://www.nytimes.com/ .
However you can click the "My Times" at the top of the page to log in.
If not registered, you click "register now".
Then you can register to receive a news email every day. You can select
the types of news you wish to receive so that you do not have to
download a lot of stories of no interest to you and to keep the
bandwidth down. On this page you select either text or html. If you
happen to select html and have a slow dialup connection, the individual
emails have a link to select text instead if the download time becomes
too excessive for you. In effect, a custom newspaper is designed for
your interest. Of course sites that do not have tons of new material
every day would not need all of this elaboration.

 
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