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Lost/stolen laptop-Password change issue

 
 
Frank
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      10-12-2006
My son lost his laptop, which is configured to automatically log on to
my wireless network (Win XP Home SP2 -- 802.11g). My network password
is now compromised. I want to change it, but I don't know how to do
so. Any help would be greatly appreciated.
Frank

 
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Malke
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      10-12-2006
Frank wrote:

> My son lost his laptop, which is configured to automatically log on to
> my wireless network (Win XP Home SP2 -- 802.11g). My network password
> is now compromised. I want to change it, but I don't know how to do
> so. Any help would be greatly appreciated.
> Frank


You change the wireless security password (and probably should change
the SSID and router management password) from the router's
configuration utility. Most routers are configured by entering the
router address into a browser addressbar from a computer wired to the
router. Then you will simply enter the new encryption key into any
computers that connect wirelessly.

An example is http://192.168.1.1 for a Linksys. Refer to your router's
manual for details.

Malke
--
Elephant Boy Computers
www.elephantboycomputers.com
"Don't Panic!"
MS-MVP Windows - Shell/User
 
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=?Utf-8?B?RnJhbmtDaGlu?=
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      10-13-2006

Also, depending on the router, you might be able to configure it so ONLY
those machines with designated "MAC addresses" can log onto the router. My
Linksys WRT54GS router has this feature.

I also installed software provided by AOL, called "Port Magic" that maps out
the network, tell who's logged on", and also logs the "MAC addresses" anyone
else, including intruders trying to log on.



"Frank" wrote:

> My son lost his laptop, which is configured to automatically log on to
> my wireless network (Win XP Home SP2 -- 802.11g). My network password
> is now compromised. I want to change it, but I don't know how to do
> so. Any help would be greatly appreciated.
> Frank
>
>

 
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=?Utf-8?B?RnJhbmtDaGlu?=
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      10-13-2006

Also, depending on the router, such as my WRT54GS Linksys router, you can
configure it such that only machines with certain "MAC addresses: can logon
to the router, to the exclusion of all other.

I also got "Port Magic" installed that logs all attempts to logon to the
network, noting the "MAC addresses" on all intruders.




"Frank" wrote:

> My son lost his laptop, which is configured to automatically log on to
> my wireless network (Win XP Home SP2 -- 802.11g). My network password
> is now compromised. I want to change it, but I don't know how to do
> so. Any help would be greatly appreciated.
> Frank
>
>

 
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Malke
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      10-13-2006
FrankChin wrote:

>
> Also, depending on the router, you might be able to configure it so
> ONLY those machines with designated "MAC addresses" can log onto the
> router. My Linksys WRT54GS router has this feature.
>
> I also installed software provided by AOL, called "Port Magic" that
> maps out the network, tell who's logged on", and also logs the "MAC
> addresses" anyone else, including intruders trying to log on.
>
>
>
> "Frank" wrote:
>
>> My son lost his laptop, which is configured to automatically log on
>> to
>> my wireless network (Win XP Home SP2 -- 802.11g). My network
>> password
>> is now compromised. I want to change it, but I don't know how to do
>> so. Any help would be greatly appreciated.
>> Frank
>>
>>


Filtering by MAC address doesn't really provide good security. Yes, it
may keep out your neighbor's kid, but MAC addresses are easily spoofed.
Port Magic, like all the other AOL-provided "security" stuff is
garbage. Better to have a good firewall and do proper security in the
first place.

The six dumbest ways to secure a wireless LAN
http://blogs.zdnet.com/Ou/index.php?p=43

Malke
--
Elephant Boy Computers
www.elephantboycomputers.com
"Don't Panic!"
MS-MVP Windows - Shell/User
 
Reply With Quote
 
=?Utf-8?B?RnJhbmtDaGlu?=
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      10-13-2006

Thanks for the comments. While we're at it, need some feedback from you.

In addition to what I mentioned, I do have Norton's full suite, i.e.
Internet Security, Anti Virus, Spam control, Parental control, Norton Ghost
9.0 installed. I have a 4 PC XP network at my small business (all wired for
security), and currently a 4 PC network at home for the family (may also wire
up).

I started using the AOL safety and security suite since I expanded to so
many PC's so rapidly , and found buying and owning 8 or more copied of
Nortons's to be a bit cost prohibitive. And I've been less than enthused wtih
the problems caused by Norton's bloatware.

In your professinal judgment then, what is the most cost effective way of
purchasing and owning best software going forward, i.e. for Internet
secuirty, firewall, spam, parental control etc.. I have no problem paying
something for the software, but paying for 8 sets of Norton's given it's
cost/benefit is not worth it.



"Malke" wrote:

> Frank wrote:
>
> > My son lost his laptop, which is configured to automatically log on to
> > my wireless network (Win XP Home SP2 -- 802.11g). My network password
> > is now compromised. I want to change it, but I don't know how to do
> > so. Any help would be greatly appreciated.
> > Frank

>
> You change the wireless security password (and probably should change
> the SSID and router management password) from the router's
> configuration utility. Most routers are configured by entering the
> router address into a browser addressbar from a computer wired to the
> router. Then you will simply enter the new encryption key into any
> computers that connect wirelessly.
>
> An example is http://192.168.1.1 for a Linksys. Refer to your router's
> manual for details.
>
> Malke
> --
> Elephant Boy Computers
> www.elephantboycomputers.com
> "Don't Panic!"
> MS-MVP Windows - Shell/User
>

 
Reply With Quote
 
=?Utf-8?B?RnJhbmtDaGlu?=
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      10-13-2006

Thanks for the comments. While we're at it, need some feedback from you.

In addition to what I mentioned, I do have Norton's full suite, i.e.
Internet Security, Anti Virus, Spam control, Parental control, Norton Ghost
9.0 installed. I have a 4 PC XP network at my small business (all wired for
security), and currently a 4 PC network at home for the family (may also wire
up).

I started using the AOL safety and security suite since I expanded to so
many PC's so rapidly , and found buying and owning 8 or more copied of
Nortons's to be a bit cost prohibitive. And I've been less than enthused wtih
the problems caused by Norton's bloatware.

In your professinal judgment then, what is the most cost effective way of
purchasing and owning best software going forward, i.e. for Internet
secuirty, firewall, spam, parental control etc.. I have no problem paying
something for the software, but paying for 8 sets of Norton's given it's
cost/benefit is not worth it.





"Malke" wrote:

> FrankChin wrote:
>
> >
> > Also, depending on the router, you might be able to configure it so
> > ONLY those machines with designated "MAC addresses" can log onto the
> > router. My Linksys WRT54GS router has this feature.
> >
> > I also installed software provided by AOL, called "Port Magic" that
> > maps out the network, tell who's logged on", and also logs the "MAC
> > addresses" anyone else, including intruders trying to log on.
> >
> >
> >
> > "Frank" wrote:
> >
> >> My son lost his laptop, which is configured to automatically log on
> >> to
> >> my wireless network (Win XP Home SP2 -- 802.11g). My network
> >> password
> >> is now compromised. I want to change it, but I don't know how to do
> >> so. Any help would be greatly appreciated.
> >> Frank
> >>
> >>

>
> Filtering by MAC address doesn't really provide good security. Yes, it
> may keep out your neighbor's kid, but MAC addresses are easily spoofed.
> Port Magic, like all the other AOL-provided "security" stuff is
> garbage. Better to have a good firewall and do proper security in the
> first place.
>
> The six dumbest ways to secure a wireless LAN
> http://blogs.zdnet.com/Ou/index.php?p=43
>
> Malke
> --
> Elephant Boy Computers
> www.elephantboycomputers.com
> "Don't Panic!"
> MS-MVP Windows - Shell/User
>

 
Reply With Quote
 
=?Utf-8?B?RnJhbmtDaGlu?=
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      10-13-2006

Thanks for the comments. While we're at it, need some feedback from you.

In addition to what I mentioned, I do have Norton's full suite, i.e.
Internet Security, Anti Virus, Spam control, Parental control, Norton Ghost
9.0 installed. I have a 4 PC XP network at my small business (all wired for
security), and currently a 4 PC network at home for the family (may also wire
up).

I started using the AOL safety and security suite since I expanded to so
many PC's so rapidly , and found buying and owning 8 or more copied of
Nortons's to be a bit cost prohibitive. And I've been less than enthused wtih
the problems caused by Norton's bloatware.

In your professinal judgment then, what is the most cost effective way of
purchasing and owning best software going forward, i.e. for Internet
secuirty, firewall, spam, parental control etc.. I have no problem paying
something for the software, but paying for 8 sets of Norton's given it's
cost/benefit is not worth it.





"Malke" wrote:

> FrankChin wrote:
>
> >
> > Also, depending on the router, you might be able to configure it so
> > ONLY those machines with designated "MAC addresses" can log onto the
> > router. My Linksys WRT54GS router has this feature.
> >
> > I also installed software provided by AOL, called "Port Magic" that
> > maps out the network, tell who's logged on", and also logs the "MAC
> > addresses" anyone else, including intruders trying to log on.
> >
> >
> >
> > "Frank" wrote:
> >
> >> My son lost his laptop, which is configured to automatically log on
> >> to
> >> my wireless network (Win XP Home SP2 -- 802.11g). My network
> >> password
> >> is now compromised. I want to change it, but I don't know how to do
> >> so. Any help would be greatly appreciated.
> >> Frank
> >>
> >>

>
> Filtering by MAC address doesn't really provide good security. Yes, it
> may keep out your neighbor's kid, but MAC addresses are easily spoofed.
> Port Magic, like all the other AOL-provided "security" stuff is
> garbage. Better to have a good firewall and do proper security in the
> first place.
>
> The six dumbest ways to secure a wireless LAN
> http://blogs.zdnet.com/Ou/index.php?p=43
>
> Malke
> --
> Elephant Boy Computers
> www.elephantboycomputers.com
> "Don't Panic!"
> MS-MVP Windows - Shell/User
>

 
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