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Int->String formatting method

 
 
Deniz Dogan
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      09-26-2006
Hello again! Yes, I have yet another problem for all of you great
programmers in here.

This should actually be a pretty easy task to complete, but somehow the
blood in my veins doesn't seem to flow the right way just now. Here's
the problem:
I have an amount of milliseconds, in the range [0,Integer.MAX_VALUE] and
I want to format it to a String of the format "HH:nn:ss,mmm" where HH
ranges between 00-99, nn between 00-59, ss between 00-59 and mmm between
000-999 (all of the ranges inclusive).
The only thing I can come up with now as a solution is a bunch of
if-then-else statements, but really now, we shouldn't have to go and do
that, do we?

I love stating problems. Looking forward to your help.

/Deniz Dogan
 
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Deniz Dogan
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      09-26-2006
Deniz Dogan wrote:
> Hello again! Yes, I have yet another problem for all of you great
> programmers in here.
>
> This should actually be a pretty easy task to complete, but somehow the
> blood in my veins doesn't seem to flow the right way just now. Here's
> the problem:
> I have an amount of milliseconds, in the range [0,Integer.MAX_VALUE] and
> I want to format it to a String of the format "HH:nn:ss,mmm" where HH
> ranges between 00-99, nn between 00-59, ss between 00-59 and mmm between
> 000-999 (all of the ranges inclusive).
> The only thing I can come up with now as a solution is a bunch of
> if-then-else statements, but really now, we shouldn't have to go and do
> that, do we?
>
> I love stating problems. Looking forward to your help.
>
> /Deniz Dogan


Disregard my post, a friend of mine solved it on four rows of code and
O(1) fashion.
 
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Oliver Wong
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      09-26-2006

"Deniz Dogan" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
news:efanv0$l2m$(E-Mail Removed)...
> Deniz Dogan wrote:
>> Hello again! Yes, I have yet another problem for all of you great
>> programmers in here.
>>
>> This should actually be a pretty easy task to complete, but somehow the
>> blood in my veins doesn't seem to flow the right way just now. Here's the
>> problem:
>> I have an amount of milliseconds, in the range [0,Integer.MAX_VALUE] and
>> I want to format it to a String of the format "HH:nn:ss,mmm" where HH
>> ranges between 00-99, nn between 00-59, ss between 00-59 and mmm between
>> 000-999 (all of the ranges inclusive).
>> The only thing I can come up with now as a solution is a bunch of
>> if-then-else statements, but really now, we shouldn't have to go and do
>> that, do we?
>>
>> I love stating problems. Looking forward to your help.
>>
>> /Deniz Dogan

>
> Disregard my post, a friend of mine solved it on four rows of code and
> O(1) fashion.


You should have post the solution, in case someone in the future
stumbles upon this post via google and has a similar problem and is looking
for the solution.

here's my guess at the solution:

public static String toTimeString(long milliseconds) {
final long MS_PER_SEC = 1000;
final long MS_PER_MIN = MS_PER_SEC * 60;
final long MS_PER_HOUR = MS_PER_MIN * 60;
final long hours = milliseconds / MS_PER_HOUR;
milliseconds %= MS_PER_HOUR;
final long minutes = milliseconds / MS_PER_MIN;
milliseconds %= MS_PER_MIN;
final long seconds = milliseconds / MS_PER_SEC;
milliseconds %= MS_PER_SEC;
StringBuffer sb = new StringBuffer();
sb.append(hours);
sb.append(":");
sb.append(minutes);
sb.append(":");
sb.append(seconds);
sb.append(",");
sb.append(milliseconds);
return sb.toString();
}

- Oliver

 
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Deniz Dogan
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      09-27-2006
Oliver Wong wrote:
>
> "Deniz Dogan" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
> news:efanv0$l2m$(E-Mail Removed)...
>> Deniz Dogan wrote:
>>> Hello again! Yes, I have yet another problem for all of you great
>>> programmers in here.
>>>
>>> This should actually be a pretty easy task to complete, but somehow
>>> the blood in my veins doesn't seem to flow the right way just now.
>>> Here's the problem:
>>> I have an amount of milliseconds, in the range [0,Integer.MAX_VALUE]
>>> and I want to format it to a String of the format "HH:nn:ss,mmm"
>>> where HH ranges between 00-99, nn between 00-59, ss between 00-59 and
>>> mmm between 000-999 (all of the ranges inclusive).
>>> The only thing I can come up with now as a solution is a bunch of
>>> if-then-else statements, but really now, we shouldn't have to go and
>>> do that, do we?
>>>
>>> I love stating problems. Looking forward to your help.
>>>
>>> /Deniz Dogan

>>
>> Disregard my post, a friend of mine solved it on four rows of code and
>> O(1) fashion.

>
> You should have post the solution, in case someone in the future
> stumbles upon this post via google and has a similar problem and is
> looking for the solution.
>
> here's my guess at the solution:
>
> public static String toTimeString(long milliseconds) {
> final long MS_PER_SEC = 1000;
> final long MS_PER_MIN = MS_PER_SEC * 60;
> final long MS_PER_HOUR = MS_PER_MIN * 60;
> final long hours = milliseconds / MS_PER_HOUR;
> milliseconds %= MS_PER_HOUR;
> final long minutes = milliseconds / MS_PER_MIN;
> milliseconds %= MS_PER_MIN;
> final long seconds = milliseconds / MS_PER_SEC;
> milliseconds %= MS_PER_SEC;
> StringBuffer sb = new StringBuffer();
> sb.append(hours);
> sb.append(":");
> sb.append(minutes);
> sb.append(":");
> sb.append(seconds);
> sb.append(",");
> sb.append(milliseconds);
> return sb.toString();
> }
>
> - Oliver


And here's my friend's solution:

public static String formatMillis(int millis) {
int ihh = millis/3600000; //amount of hours
int inn = (millis - ihh*3600000) / 60000; //amount of minutes
int iss = (millis - (ihh*3600000) - (inn * 60000)) / 1000; //amount
of seconds
int immm = (millis - (ihh*3600000) - (inn * 60000)) - iss*1000;
//amount of milliseconds
//String representations of the integers:
String mmm = "" + immm, ss = "" + iss, nn = "" + inn, hh = "" + ihh;
//Making sure the lengths of the Strings are correct:
if (mmm.length() == 1) mmm = "00" + mmm;
else if (mmm.length() == 2) mmm = "0" + mmm;
if (ss.length() == 1) ss = "0" + ss;
if (nn.length() == 1) nn = "0" + nn;
if (hh.length() == 1) hh = "0" + hh;
return hh + ":" + nn + ":" + ss + "," + mmm;
}

I have a question for you Oliver (or anyone else who'd want to answer
this question), is your solution faster than mine? I considered using
the modulo operator, but I wasn't sure how the JVM would implement it. I
figured it would just do a lot of division operations until it couldn't
divide it any more, but perhaps it implements it in a different manner?

- Deniz Dogan
 
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Thomas Weidenfeller
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      09-27-2006
Deniz Dogan wrote:
> I have a question for you Oliver (or anyone else who'd want to answer
> this question), is your solution faster than mine?


It does not matter. Unless you have evidence that an implementation
really affects an application's performance in an unacceptable way there
are more important criteria to judge an algorithm's implementation. E.g.
maintainability, or robustness regarding change.

> I considered using
> the modulo operator, but I wasn't sure how the JVM would implement it. I
> figured it would just do a lot of division operations until it couldn't
> divide it any more, but perhaps it implements it in a different manner?


That would be an extremely brain-dead thing to do. Sun programmers do a
lot of strange and stupid things in the JDK, but I can't imagine they
would do such a brain-dead modulo operator in the VM. They probably use
the C modulo operator which is probably translated into a modulo
assembler instruction - if the particular CPU provides such an
instruction. Or it is translated into a call into some assembler library
- if an old CPU doesn't provide such an assembler instruction or one
that doesn't fit the JLS modulo definition.

Simplified and broad speaking, the reminder is a by-product of binary
integer division algorithms, and as such usually does take the same or
similar time as a single integer division, whether done in hardware
(CPU' ALU) or software. Don't they teach binary arithmetic in school
any more?

But again, it doesn't matter. As long as you have no evidence that a
particular operation affects your application in an unacceptable way,
you are wasting your time trying to "optimize" such things.

/Thomas
--
The comp.lang.java.gui FAQ:
http://gd.tuwien.ac.at/faqs/faqs-hie...lang.java.gui/
ftp://ftp.cs.uu.nl/pub/NEWS.ANSWERS/...g/java/gui/faq
 
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Wibble
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Posts: n/a
 
      09-27-2006
Thomas Weidenfeller wrote:
> Deniz Dogan wrote:
>> I have a question for you Oliver (or anyone else who'd want to answer
>> this question), is your solution faster than mine?

>
> It does not matter. Unless you have evidence that an implementation
> really affects an application's performance in an unacceptable way there
> are more important criteria to judge an algorithm's implementation. E.g.
> maintainability, or robustness regarding change.
>
>> I considered using the modulo operator, but I wasn't sure how the JVM
>> would implement it. I figured it would just do a lot of division
>> operations until it couldn't divide it any more, but perhaps it
>> implements it in a different manner?

>
> That would be an extremely brain-dead thing to do. Sun programmers do a
> lot of strange and stupid things in the JDK, but I can't imagine they
> would do such a brain-dead modulo operator in the VM. They probably use
> the C modulo operator which is probably translated into a modulo
> assembler instruction - if the particular CPU provides such an
> instruction. Or it is translated into a call into some assembler library
> - if an old CPU doesn't provide such an assembler instruction or one
> that doesn't fit the JLS modulo definition.
>
> Simplified and broad speaking, the reminder is a by-product of binary
> integer division algorithms, and as such usually does take the same or
> similar time as a single integer division, whether done in hardware
> (CPU' ALU) or software. Don't they teach binary arithmetic in school
> any more?
>
> But again, it doesn't matter. As long as you have no evidence that a
> particular operation affects your application in an unacceptable way,
> you are wasting your time trying to "optimize" such things.
>
> /Thomas

That said, Oliver's use of StringBuffer instead of + will
make his code much faster.
 
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Deniz Dogan
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Posts: n/a
 
      09-27-2006
Wibble wrote:
> Thomas Weidenfeller wrote:

[snip]
> That said, Oliver's use of StringBuffer instead of + will
> make his code much faster.


I trust you on that one, but I feel obliged to ask why?

- Deniz Dogan
 
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Oliver Wong
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      09-27-2006

"Deniz Dogan" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
news:efds1n$msv$(E-Mail Removed)...
> Wibble wrote:
>> Thomas Weidenfeller wrote:

> [snip]
>> That said, Oliver's use of StringBuffer instead of + will
>> make his code much faster.

>
> I trust you on that one, but I feel obliged to ask why?


First of all, my code is incorrect, because I forgot to check if I need
to prefix '0' before certain of the numbers. For example, I might generate
"1:1:1,1" instead of "01:01:01,0001".

The exact reason that StringBuffer is faster is that String is difficult
to explain. With a lot of hand waving, the overall reason is String is
immutable, but StringBuilder is not, so String has to do a lot of
contortions to progressively build up the output String, whereas
StringBuilder can perform the String construction in the "obvious" way.

- Oliver

 
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Oliver Wong
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Posts: n/a
 
      09-27-2006

"Thomas Weidenfeller" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
news:efddev$c86$(E-Mail Removed)...
> Deniz Dogan wrote:
>> I considered using the modulo operator, but I wasn't sure how the JVM
>> would implement it. I figured it would just do a lot of division
>> operations until it couldn't divide it any more, but perhaps it
>> implements it in a different manner?

>
> That would be an extremely brain-dead thing to do. Sun programmers do a
> lot of strange and stupid things in the JDK, but I can't imagine they
> would do such a brain-dead modulo operator in the VM. They probably use
> the C modulo operator which is probably translated into a modulo assembler
> instruction - if the particular CPU provides such an instruction. Or it is
> translated into a call into some assembler library - if an old CPU doesn't
> provide such an assembler instruction or one that doesn't fit the JLS
> modulo definition.


I think that modern x86 Intel and AMD chips have a built in modulo
operator. For CPUs which don't have modulo, you could implement it like
this:

C = A % B

temp = A / B
temp = B * A
C = A - temp

So worst case, an integer modulo would take up 3 "normal" integer
operations worth of time. The usage of "temp" implies an extra register, but
"temp" and "C" could use the same register.

- Oliver

 
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Deniz Dogan
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Posts: n/a
 
      09-27-2006
Oliver Wong wrote:
>
> "Deniz Dogan" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
> news:efds1n$msv$(E-Mail Removed)...
>> Wibble wrote:
>>> Thomas Weidenfeller wrote:

>> [snip]
>>> That said, Oliver's use of StringBuffer instead of + will
>>> make his code much faster.

>>
>> I trust you on that one, but I feel obliged to ask why?

>
> First of all, my code is incorrect, because I forgot to check if I
> need to prefix '0' before certain of the numbers. For example, I might
> generate "1:1:1,1" instead of "01:01:01,0001".


Yes, that's exactly why I didn't quite see how your code was faster.
(And also, the milliseconds should be 001, not 0001 )

> The exact reason that StringBuffer is faster is that String is
> difficult to explain. With a lot of hand waving, the overall reason is
> String is immutable, but StringBuilder is not, so String has to do a lot
> of contortions to progressively build up the output String, whereas
> StringBuilder can perform the String construction in the "obvious" way.


I think I got it, thanks a lot for your help!
 
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