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Re: learning emacs lisp

 
 
Xah Lee
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      10-30-2005
well, in the past couple of days i started my own:
http://xahlee.org/emacs/notes.html

but i'm sure something like it exists.

Btw, the elisp intro by
Robert J Chassell. At:
http://www.gnu.org/software/emacs/emacs-lisp-intro/
is extremely well written.
(and so is the elisp reference)

Bravo to GNU & Freesoftware Foundation once again. Thank you.

PS **** unix and unix ****heads. **** asshole Larry Wall. **** Python
documenation community and their ****ing ass lying thru their teeth
ignorance ****ing ****. (See:
http://xahlee.org/UnixResource_dir/w...bni_papri.html)

Disclaimer: all mention of real person are opinion only.

Xah
http://www.velocityreviews.com/forums/(E-Mail Removed)
http://xahlee.org/

rgb wrote:
> > i'm looking for something example based... for senior professional
> > programers who may want to pickup some elisp for practical macro.

>
> Unfortunately the path from any given language to Elisp varies vastly.
> For example a Prolog programmer would need far fewer tips than a Cobol
> or even a C programmer. It's unlikely you will find something
> tailored to your specific experience.
>
> I'd already written programs in well over 100 languages in the 20
> years before learning Elisp yet I didn't find the intro terribly
> tedious until around section 13 (Counting). At that point it switches
> focus toward examples of creating functions rather than introducing
> syntax and available features. Perhaps starting at section 12 would
> suit your learning style better.
>
> As you probably realize, the language itself is just syntax and the
> hard part is learning about all the facilities at your disposal once
> you decide to write something. There are a lot of features available
> and, although daunting, I think the reference is the best resource
> for discovering them.
>
> This group has also been indispensable to me.


 
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Steve Holden
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Posts: n/a
 
      10-31-2005
[To new readers:

please ignore the rantings of this unbalanced person, who is well known
for posing inappropriate and inflammatory material on news groups and
mailing lists of all kinds.]

Xah Lee wrote:
> well, in the past couple of days i started my own:
> http://xahlee.org/emacs/notes.html
>
> but i'm sure something like it exists.
>
> Btw, the elisp intro by
> Robert J Chassell. At:
> http://www.gnu.org/software/emacs/emacs-lisp-intro/
> is extremely well written.
> (and so is the elisp reference)
>
> Bravo to GNU & Freesoftware Foundation once again. Thank you.
>
> PS **** unix and unix ****heads. **** asshole Larry Wall. **** Python
> documenation community and their ****ing ass lying thru their teeth
> ignorance ****ing ****. (See:
> http://xahlee.org/UnixResource_dir/w...bni_papri.html)
>
> Disclaimer: all mention of real person are opinion only.
>
> Xah
> (E-Mail Removed)
> ∑ http://xahlee.org/
>
> rgb wrote:
>
>>>i'm looking for something example based... for senior professional
>>>programers who may want to pickup some elisp for practical macro.

>>
>>Unfortunately the path from any given language to Elisp varies vastly.
>>For example a Prolog programmer would need far fewer tips than a Cobol
>>or even a C programmer. It's unlikely you will find something
>>tailored to your specific experience.
>>
>>I'd already written programs in well over 100 languages in the 20
>>years before learning Elisp yet I didn't find the intro terribly
>>tedious until around section 13 (Counting). At that point it switches
>>focus toward examples of creating functions rather than introducing
>>syntax and available features. Perhaps starting at section 12 would
>>suit your learning style better.
>>
>>As you probably realize, the language itself is just syntax and the
>>hard part is learning about all the facilities at your disposal once
>>you decide to write something. There are a lot of features available
>>and, although daunting, I think the reference is the best resource
>>for discovering them.
>>
>>This group has also been indispensable to me.

>
>



--
Steve Holden +44 150 684 7255 +1 800 494 3119
Holden Web LLC www.holdenweb.com
PyCon TX 2006 www.python.org/pycon/

 
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