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Please suggest on the book to follow

 
 
santanu
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      01-27-2005
Hi all,

I know a little python (not the OOP part) learnt by studying the online

tutorial. Now I would like to learn it more thoroughly.

I have access to 'Programming Python' which I liked (on flipping
through the
pages), but the problem is it deals only with version 2.0 of Phython.

So, I would be glad if you could suggest me whether it would be really
a good
idea to learn from this book. In other words, will I have to unlearn
too much
after I complete this book (by the time I am done with this book, I
believe
we will be having Python 2.6 or so).

Please suggest.

Regards,
Santanu

 
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Fuzzyman
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      01-27-2005
We've only just had Python 2.4. Based on previous experience that means
it will be about 18 months before python 2.5.....

I learned to program from 'Programming Python'. Particularly the stuff
on Tkinter is very helpful. I don't think you'll have much to
'unlearn', although obviously there is stuff it doesn't cover (like new
style classes).
Regards,


Fuzzyman
http://www.voidspace.org.uk/python/index.shtml

 
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Ola Natvig
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Posts: n/a
 
      01-27-2005
santanu wrote:
> Hi all,
>
> I know a little python (not the OOP part) learnt by studying the online
>
> tutorial. Now I would like to learn it more thoroughly.
>
> I have access to 'Programming Python' which I liked (on flipping
> through the
> pages), but the problem is it deals only with version 2.0 of Phython.
>
> So, I would be glad if you could suggest me whether it would be really
> a good
> idea to learn from this book. In other words, will I have to unlearn
> too much
> after I complete this book (by the time I am done with this book, I
> believe
> we will be having Python 2.6 or so).
>
> Please suggest.
>
> Regards,
> Santanu
>


I realy would recomend Practival Python it's a wery good book which I
think it's written for 2.2 or 2.3, but it's got all the basic modern
python aspects like new style classes.

http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg...books&n=507846

--
--------------------------------------
Ola Natvig <(E-Mail Removed)>
infoSense AS / development
 
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Satchidanand Haridas
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Posts: n/a
 
      01-27-2005
Hi,

Probably the best resources for learning Python are available online.
Here are a few sites that you might find helpful:

1. http://byteofpython.info/

2. http://www.diveintopython.org/ -- Writted by Mark Pilgrim, covers
many advanced material. The site says /"Dive into Python"/ is a "Python
book for experienced programmers."

3. http://gnosis.cx/TPiP/ -- "Site for Text Processing in Python", a
book by David mertz. You will find many other very good Python related
material on his website.



regards,
Satchit


----
Satchidanand Haridas (sharidas at zeomega dot com)

ZeOmega (www.zeomega.com)
Open Minds' Open Solutions

#20,Rajalakshmi Plaza,
South End Road,
Basavanagudi,
Bangalore-560 004, India



santanu wrote:

>Hi all,
>
>I know a little python (not the OOP part) learnt by studying the online
>
>tutorial. Now I would like to learn it more thoroughly.
>
>I have access to 'Programming Python' which I liked (on flipping
>through the
>pages), but the problem is it deals only with version 2.0 of Phython.
>
>So, I would be glad if you could suggest me whether it would be really
>a good
>idea to learn from this book. In other words, will I have to unlearn
>too much
>after I complete this book (by the time I am done with this book, I
>believe
>we will be having Python 2.6 or so).
>
>Please suggest.
>
>Regards,
>Santanu
>
>
>

 
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Cameron Laird
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Posts: n/a
 
      01-27-2005
In article <(E-Mail Removed) .com>,
Fuzzyman <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
>We've only just had Python 2.4. Based on previous experience that means
>it will be about 18 months before python 2.5.....
>
>I learned to program from 'Programming Python'. Particularly the stuff
>on Tkinter is very helpful. I don't think you'll have much to
>'unlearn', although obviously there is stuff it doesn't cover (like new
>style classes).

.
.
.
Python is considerate of programmers. While experience with commercial
products might lead to an expectation that 2.0 and 2.4 differ greatly,
in fact it's quite feasible to learn from books aimed at 1.5 or even
before, and have your results work perfectly well under 2.4.
 
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santanu
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      01-27-2005
Thanks for the reply.
>From your suggestions, I guess I would have no problems

learning from Programming Python. I didn't like Core Python
Programming and such books. I like to read cover to cover
and the chapters on data structures and such elementary things
put me to sleep. I already have an idea of those things.
I have a fair knowledge of C and some Perl.

>From what you and Fyzzyman said, I guess when I am done with

Programming Python, graduating to the latest features would
be quite easy. Isn't it?

Regards,
Santanu

 
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phr@localhost.localdomain
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      01-27-2005
"santanu" <(E-Mail Removed)> writes:
> I know a little python (not the OOP part) learnt by studying the online
> tutorial. Now I would like to learn it more thoroughly.


I think there's supposed to be a new version of Python in a Nutshell
coming. That's a more serious book than Learning Python.
 
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Cameron Laird
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Posts: n/a
 
      01-27-2005
In article <(E-Mail Removed) .com>,
santanu <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
.
.
.
>>From what you and Fyzzyman said, I guess when I am done with

>Programming Python, graduating to the latest features would
>be quite easy. Isn't it?

.
.
.
Yes.
 
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Alex Martelli
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      01-27-2005
<(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:

> "santanu" <(E-Mail Removed)> writes:
> > I know a little python (not the OOP part) learnt by studying the online
> > tutorial. Now I would like to learn it more thoroughly.

>
> I think there's supposed to be a new version of Python in a Nutshell


Just a 2nd edition. I'm just starting to write it. By the time it's
done and out in print, say six months if you're a VERY optimistic guy,
I'm pretty sure "santanu" will be an experienced Pythonista and quite
ready to take advantage, if he chooses, of the Nutshell's 2nd edition as
a convenient desktop reference, which is its main intended role.

> coming. That's a more serious book than Learning Python.


Speaking as the author of the Nutshell, and a TR for Learning, I think
I'm reasonably unbiased (or, equally biased in favor of both, and I
don't think of Learning as ``less serious'' -- it does have a different
role, of course.

If a book whose title is "Learning X" (for any X) does its job well,
then when you're done with it you can probably put it aside -- as
Wittgenstein said of the learner, "he must so to speak throw away the
ladder, after he has climbed up on it".

A book that is meant mostly as a convenient reference, if _it_ does its
job, keeps being useful for a longer time. On the other hand, using the
Nutshell for the purpose of learning Python, while certainly feasible if
you're well skilled in computer programming (in other languages), may
not be as easy as using "Learning Python" for that purpose!

All in all, while I'm of course gladder the more copies of the Nutshell
are sold, I still think that, for the _learning_ part, most people might
be better served by "Learning Python" -- or, for that matter, the
already recommended "Practical Python" (it has many significant
completely worked-out example programs -- I was a TR for it, too) or
"Dive into Python" (VERY fast and meant for already-experienced
programmers -- I wasn't a TR for it, but, my _wife_ was...


Alex
 
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santanu
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      01-28-2005

Thanks for the link
http://gnosis.cx/TPiP/

It was wonderful. Once I get somewhat more experienced in
Python, I guess this site will provide me with some good
fun times.

For the moment, I decided to follow Programming Python.
Once done, I shall learn the newest features from some
latest book like the Nutshell one.
Thanks to all for replying.

Regards,
Santanu

 
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