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16GBit/s link

 
 
Gary
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      05-01-2004
I need to understand the technologies to link 2 UK offices with a 16Gbit/s
capable link.

Is the only way or at least the most common way to use STM-whatever

What hardware would I be looking at for each end of this link assuming some
Telco install the relevant link in the middle.

Just a start to understandf the options please.

Gary


 
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Walter Roberson
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      05-01-2004
In article <ECEkc.942$nN6.575@lakeread06>, Gary <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
:I need to understand the technologies to link 2 UK offices with a 16Gbit/s
:capable link.

:Is the only way or at least the most common way to use STM-whatever

Is that really a sixteen gigabit per second link you are asking about?

You might be able to approach that with some of the higher-end routers
and sixteen 1 Gb/s links FastEtherChannel'd together, but I
don't believe I've heard of anyone using a link that fast commercially.

Cisco has some 10 Gb/s interfaces; FastEtherChannel'ing together
two of those might get you a closer approximation to 16 Gb/s.

If you were using FastEtherChannel or equivilent, you would have to
select a paticular load-balancing algorithm, and no matter what you
choose, it isn't going to be the same as running a single 16 gigabit link.
--
Ceci, ce n'est pas une idée.
 
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Ben
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      05-01-2004
16Gbs??? That is well into major telco land.

"Walter Roberson" <(E-Mail Removed)-cnrc.gc.ca> wrote in message
news:c6v71s$jn6$(E-Mail Removed)...
> In article <ECEkc.942$nN6.575@lakeread06>, Gary <(E-Mail Removed)>

wrote:
> :I need to understand the technologies to link 2 UK offices with a

16Gbit/s
> :capable link.
>
> :Is the only way or at least the most common way to use STM-whatever
>
> Is that really a sixteen gigabit per second link you are asking about?
>
> You might be able to approach that with some of the higher-end routers
> and sixteen 1 Gb/s links FastEtherChannel'd together, but I
> don't believe I've heard of anyone using a link that fast commercially.
>
> Cisco has some 10 Gb/s interfaces; FastEtherChannel'ing together
> two of those might get you a closer approximation to 16 Gb/s.
>
> If you were using FastEtherChannel or equivilent, you would have to
> select a paticular load-balancing algorithm, and no matter what you
> choose, it isn't going to be the same as running a single 16 gigabit link.
> --
> Ceci, ce n'est pas une idée.



 
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Kurt Jaeger
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      05-01-2004
Hi!

In article <ECEkc.942$nN6.575@lakeread06>, Gary <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
>I need to understand the technologies to link 2 UK offices with a 16Gbit/s
>capable link.
>
>Is the only way or at least the most common way to use STM-whatever


No, you need a dark fiber between the two sites. Depending on the
distance, you'll need some signal regeneration site somewhere in between.

Then you start looking at your application: why does it need this
bandwidth and how does it wants to use it ? Which protocol
is being used ? IP ? TCP ? Something else ?

Then you look for some transmission gear that allows you
to transfer at those bit-rates.

Some telco manufacturers already build devices to transmit 40 Gbit/sec
over fiber. It's probably lab quality, so you need to discuss
some sort of beta. Search for 40 GBit/sec with google.

I know at least from Alcatel who did this.

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MfG/Best regards, Kurt Jaeger 16 years to go !
LF.net GmbH fon +49 711 90074-23 http://www.velocityreviews.com/forums/(E-Mail Removed)
Ruppmannstr. 27 fax +49 711 90074-33
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Kurt Jaeger
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      05-01-2004
>In article <ECEkc.942$nN6.575@lakeread06>, Gary <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
>>I need to understand the technologies to link 2 UK offices with a 16Gbit/s
>>capable link.


www.mintera.com

Looks interesting...

--
MfG/Best regards, Kurt Jaeger 16 years to go !
LF.net GmbH fon +49 711 90074-23 (E-Mail Removed)
Ruppmannstr. 27 fax +49 711 90074-33
D-70565 Stuttgart mob +49 171 3101372
 
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shope
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      05-01-2004

"Gary" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
news:ECEkc.942$nN6.575@lakeread06...
> I need to understand the technologies to link 2 UK offices with a 16Gbit/s
> capable link.
>
> Is the only way or at least the most common way to use STM-whatever


common is the wrong word - 2.5 G per wavelength (for PoS) is the usual
limit, although some telcos may sell you a 10G capable link.

Anything you need will require fibre end to end, so in turn that may limit
who you can go to - the telco will need to be able to provide fibre to both
sites.

you may be able to get dark fibre, but that is not common in the UK unless
you are working at MAN distances - say up to 20 to 50 miles.
>
> What hardware would I be looking at for each end of this link assuming

some
> Telco install the relevant link in the middle.


10G comes in 2 flavours - STM-64 and Gig Ethernet LAN style encoding. what
you use will be dictated by what wAN link you manage to find.

in cisco land for hardware you are looking at either GSR12k or higher, or
Cat 6509s with sup 720s. Expect the hardware to cost at 6 or 7 digits when
you add all the complications in (after all your LANs or local connections
need to handle this bandwidth as well). The telco services may cost even
more - a lot will depend on where the sites.
>
> Just a start to understandf the options please.
>
> Gary

--
Regards

Stephen Hope - return address needs fewer xxs


 
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Simon Leinen
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      05-01-2004
Gary writes:
> I need to understand the technologies to link 2 UK offices with a 16Gbit/s
> capable link.


Get fibre! It can carry more than 3 Tb/s with current technology.

Then you probably want to carry 16 Gb/s of packets over this:

A cost-effective IP-capable solution with Cisco gear would be two
Catalyst 6505/7606 OSR, each with Supervisor 720 and a four-port 10
GbE card (there are two-port 10 GbE cards, which are faster, but they
are also more expensive, and you didn't say you need 20 Gb/s .

If you interconnect two pairs of 10 GbE interfaces, I'm very confident
that you can get 16 Gb/s over it, if you have some amount of
distribution of traffic sources and sinks on both sides. This is an
interesting problem, but can normally be addressed by the design of
the things that use the link (some kind of storage replication system?).

Depending on the availability of multiple fibre pairs, and on
distance, you have different options of transporting those two 10 Gb/s
channels. If and when Cisco supports DWDM XENPAK modules (which
exist), you can multiplex the two channels over a single pair (even a
single fibre if you want) with no external active equipment, provided
the distance doesn't make you require amplifiers. With some expert
help, such links can be cost-effectively home-built from off-the-shelf
parts (ordinary single-mode fibres, passive optical splitters, and for
longer distance, dispersion compensators and amplifiers).

If you want to transport other stuff than IP packets and MPLS or
Ethernet frames (let's say Fibre Channel, ESCON or whatever), look at
"Metro WDM" or combined WDM/TDM gear (Sorrento, Cisco's ex-ADVA and
ex-Cerent stuff (now 15200 and 15400 I think), Nortel Optera Metro
etc.) Again, you mileage will vary according to fibre availability and
distance.

Of course the design will need to take availability requirements into
account (including the larger question of who should be blamed when
things break).
--
Simon.
 
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Simon Leinen
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      05-01-2004
Kurt Jaeger writes:
> [...] Some telco manufacturers already build devices to transmit 40
> Gbit/sec over fiber. It's probably lab quality, so you need to
> discuss some sort of beta. Search for 40 GBit/sec with google.


This may be misleading... 40 Gb/s as a single channel is telco-land
($$$) today, but 10 Gb/s can be done with cost-effective gear, and
transmission of two 10 Gb/s channels over four (or two (or one!))
fiber(s) can be done with off-the-shelf components... as I said, DWDM
XENPAKs exist - although Cisco won't support them yet - and can be
combined with passive optical filters/couplers, and
amplifiers/dispersion compensators if necessary.

If you have enough fibre pairs, you can simply use 10GB-ER XENPAKs
today. You can simply not multiplex them optically, and optical
amplification may not work either because of dispersion issues - the
optical signal generated by a non-WDM XENPAK may be too wide-band.

My colleagues have built some of these things with CWDM/DWDM GBICs,
and I trust them when they tell me this will work with 10 GbE too.
--
Simon.
 
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AnyBody43
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      05-01-2004
Simon Leinen <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote
> I'm very confident that you can get 16 Gb/s over it,


Hi,
I don't mean this to be harsh but I guess that it may still turn
out that way, sorry.

What exactly is going to drive it at that rate?

Clearly if there are MANY conversations over it then
it might well be possible but my persent (quite possibly flawed)
understanding is that for example the PCI bus is limited to
800Mbps.

Dear OP, Have you heard of "bandwidth delay product"?


Also Kurt Jaeger writes:
> Then you start looking at your application: why does it need this
> bandwidth and how does it wants to use it ? Which protocol
> is being used ? IP ? TCP ? Something else ?


You for sure need to start here.

If you post further details then we may be able to assist.
 
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