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Re: emergent/swarm/evolutionary systems etc

 
 
Cameron Laird
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      04-04-2004
In article <c4btjr$8il$(E-Mail Removed)>,
Peter MacKenzie <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
>(Hmm, this might appear as a double posting, but I don't think my last one
>made it through.)
>
>Thanks, but.
>
>("One approach to discussing and comparing AI
>problem solving strategies is to categorize them using the
>terms ''strong'' and ''weak'' methods. Generally, a weak

.
[much more]
.
.
You might like "The Outsider's Guide to Artificial Intelligence"
<URL: http://robotwisdom.com/ai/index.html >.
--

Cameron Laird <(E-Mail Removed)>
Business: http://www.Phaseit.net
 
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Peter MacKenzie
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      04-04-2004
>You might like "The Outsider's Guide to Artificial Intelligence"
><URL: http://robotwisdom.com/ai/index.html >.


Yes. It is interesting. I've been playing with the idea of graphical
representations for programming 'phrases' for a while, and the reference to
LISP brought it to mind. Although LISP doesn't look that much better than
Python code, are there any programs out there that let you program, um,
programs, using various shapes, colours etc? Just thinking about it brings
up all manner of difficulties that would be encountered if you tried to
create such a thing, but it would be nice if there was some immediately
obvious graphical connection between pieces of code (so beginners like me
didn't keep trying to put the square code through the round code ).
Just a thought of the 'in the shower' variety.

I also liked the idea of the metagame project
(http://satirist.org/learn-game/projects/metagame.html), though I don't see
myself taking on a challenge of that magnitude in the reasonably foreseeable
future.







Cameron Laird <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
news:(E-Mail Removed)...
> In article <c4btjr$8il$(E-Mail Removed)>,
> Peter MacKenzie <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
> >(Hmm, this might appear as a double posting, but I don't think my last

one
> >made it through.)
> >
> >Thanks, but.
> >
> >("One approach to discussing and comparing AI
> >problem solving strategies is to categorize them using the
> >terms ''strong'' and ''weak'' methods. Generally, a weak

> .
> [much more]
> .
> .
> You might like "The Outsider's Guide to Artificial Intelligence"
> <URL: http://robotwisdom.com/ai/index.html >.
> --
>
> Cameron Laird <(E-Mail Removed)>
> Business: http://www.Phaseit.net



 
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Peter Hansen
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      04-04-2004
Peter MacKenzie wrote:

>>You might like "The Outsider's Guide to Artificial Intelligence"
>><URL: http://robotwisdom.com/ai/index.html >.

>
> Yes. It is interesting. I've been playing with the idea of graphical
> representations for programming 'phrases' for a while, and the reference to
> LISP brought it to mind. Although LISP doesn't look that much better than
> Python code, are there any programs out there that let you program, um,
> programs, using various shapes, colours etc? Just thinking about it brings
> up all manner of difficulties that would be encountered if you tried to
> create such a thing, but it would be nice if there was some immediately
> obvious graphical connection between pieces of code [...]


Using the "G" graphical language of LabVIEW, all code ends up
_literally_ looking like spaghetti... would that help?

-Peter
 
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Cameron Laird
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      04-04-2004
In article <c4pbri$afg$(E-Mail Removed)>,
Peter MacKenzie <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
.
.
.
>LISP brought it to mind. Although LISP doesn't look that much better than
>Python code, are there any programs out there that let you program, um,
>programs, using various shapes, colours etc? Just thinking about it brings

.
.
.
We often call that "visual programming", and it comes in
several strengths
http://www.cs.berkeley.edu/~maratb/c...per/node2.html
http://foldoc.doc.ic.ac.uk/foldoc/fo...&action=Search
news:comp.lang.visual
--

Cameron Laird <(E-Mail Removed)>
Business: http://www.Phaseit.net
 
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Cameron Laird
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      04-04-2004
In article <(E-Mail Removed)>,
Peter Hansen <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
.
.
.
>> LISP brought it to mind. Although LISP doesn't look that much better than
>> Python code, are there any programs out there that let you program, um,
>> programs, using various shapes, colours etc? Just thinking about it brings
>> up all manner of difficulties that would be encountered if you tried to
>> create such a thing, but it would be nice if there was some immediately
>> obvious graphical connection between pieces of code [...]

>
>Using the "G" graphical language of LabVIEW, all code ends up
>_literally_ looking like spaghetti... would that help?
>
>-Peter


LabVIEW's the first example that came to my mind, although
perhaps Prograph or JavaBeans (!) could be argued as more
commercially successful.

I've worked on VPLs a couple of cycles in my career already,
in process-control contexts. My enthusiasm is tepid--but
then I've exceedingly text-oriented.
--

Cameron Laird <(E-Mail Removed)>
Business: http://www.Phaseit.net
 
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Peter MacKenzie
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      04-04-2004
Looking at it, I don't think it's for me. I'll keep it in mind for future
tasks, but this dissertation would be better served by text coding and a
raster display. The flow chart code and vector graphics output of LabVIEW
might be useful if I was doing sociological work, as that uses a lot of flow
chart stuff to model the inter-linkages between people, but I'm not really a
people person. Another minute, another thing I've learned. It's not quite
as exciting as following the 'thinking' tutorial though.

>>> fruit = "bannana"
>>> bakedfood = " nut bread"
>>> fruit + bakedfood

'bannana nut bread'

>>>message = "What's up, doc?"


>>> fruit *len(fruit)

'bannanabannanabannanabannanabannanabannanabannana '
>>> fruit *len(message)

'bannanabannanabannanabannanabannanabannanabannana bannanabannanabannanabanna
nabannanabannanabannanabannana'

It took me a bit to figure out this one:

>>>fruit * pow(len(message),1)

'bannanabannanabannanabannanabannanabannanabannana bannanabannanabannanabanna
nabannanabannanabannanabannana'

(I won't take it to >>>fruit * pow(len(message),2)) There's such a thing a
too much fibre.

Cameron Laird <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
news:(E-Mail Removed)...
> In article <(E-Mail Removed)>,
> Peter Hansen <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
> .
> .
> .
> >> LISP brought it to mind. Although LISP doesn't look that much better

than
> >> Python code, are there any programs out there that let you program, um,
> >> programs, using various shapes, colours etc? Just thinking about it

brings
> >> up all manner of difficulties that would be encountered if you tried to
> >> create such a thing, but it would be nice if there was some immediately
> >> obvious graphical connection between pieces of code [...]

> >
> >Using the "G" graphical language of LabVIEW, all code ends up
> >_literally_ looking like spaghetti... would that help?
> >
> >-Peter

>
> LabVIEW's the first example that came to my mind, although
> perhaps Prograph or JavaBeans (!) could be argued as more
> commercially successful.
>
> I've worked on VPLs a couple of cycles in my career already,
> in process-control contexts. My enthusiasm is tepid--but
> then I've exceedingly text-oriented.
> --
>
> Cameron Laird <(E-Mail Removed)>
> Business: http://www.Phaseit.net



 
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