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looking for good C source code

 
 
Richard Heathfield
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      12-27-2003
Peter Nilsson wrote:

> But more critically, a group considering a project that would actually
> _need_ more than two (say) genuine C _experts_ should probably
> reconsider it's choice of programming language!


Or perhaps a group that thinks it can get away with using non-experts should
be designing street-signs instead of software.

> In any case, many of the listed people _have_ colaborated on a real-life
> project: "C Unleashed". Although, Francis Glassborow wasn't entirely
> convinced of the merits of that project, even if he was satisfied with
> the quality of production.


I hold the opposite position to Francis. I think the project was worth
doing, but I think the timescales involved made it more or less impossible
to provide the kind of quality we'd have been happy with. On the other
hand, perfectionists are /never/ happy with the quality, are they? And if
there's one thing (other than C) that unites clc regs, it's perfectionism.

--
Richard Heathfield : http://www.velocityreviews.com/forums/(E-Mail Removed)
"Usenet is a strange place." - Dennis M Ritchie, 29 July 1999.
C FAQ: http://www.eskimo.com/~scs/C-faq/top.html
K&R answers, C books, etc: http://users.powernet.co.uk/eton
 
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Peter Pichler
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      12-27-2003
"Richard Heathfield" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
news:bskl56$j0g$(E-Mail Removed)...
> And if
> there's one thing (other than C) that unites clc regs, it's perfectionism.


s/rfectionism/dantry

Seriously, I think CU is a good book. It may have been knocked up in limited
time, but that only shows more about the quality of its authors. It's not a
beginners' book after all, and the others care more about the content than
anything else.


 
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Michael B Allen
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      12-28-2003
On Fri, 26 Dec 2003 15:31:43 -0500, Clark wrote:

> Hi all.
> I'm looking for good C source code to study and be able to advance my C
> programming skills. Do you recomend any open source project in
> particular that in your opinion has good writen C code? Thanks.


Here's my open source "toolbelt" of code:

http://www.ioplex.com/~miallen/libmba/dl/src/

Regarding it's quality; most of the modules are ANSI C so other than that
quality is a matter of opinion. Or it depends on what you're using the
code for. Condsider the stack.c module for example. It was developed with
the assistance of people on this newsgroup several years ago and helped
define my style. However it is a general purpose ADT that automatically
grows and shrinks as memory requirements change. It also checks parameters
and sets errno. These are things that would not be appropriate in some
cases. Some simple PUSH/POP macros would certainly be more efficient.

Mike
 
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CBFalconer
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      12-28-2003
Sidney Cadot wrote:
> Richard Heathfield wrote:
>
> > [snip]

>
> A rather funny thought just occurred to me: what would happen if
> people of this caliber got together to work on a real-life project?
> Seems that a mediocre outcome is out of the question... Either the
> result would be quite brilliant or a total deadlock, I think


The book "C Unleashed", by Heathfield et al, is a fairly recent
example.

--
Chuck F ((E-Mail Removed)) ((E-Mail Removed))
Available for consulting/temporary embedded and systems.
<http://cbfalconer.home.att.net> USE worldnet address!


 
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Ed Morton
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      12-28-2003


Richard Heathfield wrote:
> Peter Nilsson wrote:
>
>
>>But more critically, a group considering a project that would actually
>>_need_ more than two (say) genuine C _experts_ should probably
>>reconsider it's choice of programming language!

>
>
> Or perhaps a group that thinks it can get away with using non-experts should
> be designing street-signs instead of software.


In at least some applications, and I'd suspect most, the benefits of C
expertise are a drop in ocean compared to expertise in the domain that's
using C.

Given the choice of a domain expert with limitted C knowledge and a C
expert with limitted domain knowledge, I'd certainly choose the domain
expert.

Ed.

 
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Richard Heathfield
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      12-28-2003
Ed Morton wrote:

>
>
> Richard Heathfield wrote:
>> Peter Nilsson wrote:
>>
>>
>>>But more critically, a group considering a project that would actually
>>>_need_ more than two (say) genuine C _experts_ should probably
>>>reconsider it's choice of programming language!

>>
>>
>> Or perhaps a group that thinks it can get away with using non-experts
>> should be designing street-signs instead of software.

>
> In at least some applications, and I'd suspect most, the benefits of C
> expertise are a drop in ocean compared to expertise in the domain that's
> using C.
>
> Given the choice of a domain expert with limitted C knowledge and a C
> expert with limitted domain knowledge, I'd certainly choose the domain
> expert.


Frankly, given the same choice, so would I - and I might even consider
switching the project language to that favoured by the domain expert.

Interestingly, in most of /my/ programming career, the critical domain has
been C itself.

--
Richard Heathfield : (E-Mail Removed)
"Usenet is a strange place." - Dennis M Ritchie, 29 July 1999.
C FAQ: http://www.eskimo.com/~scs/C-faq/top.html
K&R answers, C books, etc: http://users.powernet.co.uk/eton
 
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Mark McIntyre
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      12-28-2003
On Sat, 27 Dec 2003 22:09:10 -0600, in comp.lang.c , Ed Morton
<(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:

>
>
>Richard Heathfield wrote:
>>
>> Or perhaps a group that thinks it can get away with using non-experts should
>> be designing street-signs instead of software.

>
>Given the choice of a domain expert with limitted C knowledge and a C
>expert with limitted domain knowledge, I'd certainly choose the domain
>expert.


Hmm. Sounds like a microsoftian saying, or do you work in Dilbert's
office?

Lets face it, if you had a choice of either one or the other, your
project is already doomed. You don't know enough C to write hte
programme well, or you don't know enough about your requirements
domain to design it in the first place... argh.

--
Mark McIntyre
CLC FAQ <http://www.eskimo.com/~scs/C-faq/top.html>
CLC readme: <http://www.angelfire.com/ms3/bchambless0/welcome_to_clc.html>


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Richard Heathfield
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      12-28-2003
Mark McIntyre wrote:
> Ed Morton wrote:
>>Richard Heathfield wrote:
>>>
>>> Or perhaps a group that thinks it can get away with using non-experts
>>> should be designing street-signs instead of software.

>>
>>Given the choice of a domain expert with limitted C knowledge and a C
>>expert with limitted domain knowledge, I'd certainly choose the domain
>>expert.

>
> Hmm. Sounds like a microsoftian saying, or do you work in Dilbert's
> office?
>
> Lets face it, if you had a choice of either one or the other, your
> project is already doomed. You don't know enough C to write hte
> programme well, or you don't know enough about your requirements
> domain to design it in the first place... argh.


It doesn't have to be that stark a choice. Expertise is not a Boolean
concept. It is possible to know enough about a domain to do useful work in
it without necessarily being an expert in that domain, as long as real
expertise is somehow available to you when required (co-worker, good book,
whatever). Similarly, it is possible to know enough about C to do useful
work in it without necessarily being a C expert.

If you're good at picking your team, you'll have C experts AND domain
experts, who will learn from each other as the project progresses.

--
Richard Heathfield : (E-Mail Removed)
"Usenet is a strange place." - Dennis M Ritchie, 29 July 1999.
C FAQ: http://www.eskimo.com/~scs/C-faq/top.html
K&R answers, C books, etc: http://users.powernet.co.uk/eton
 
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Servé Lau
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      12-28-2003
"Peter Nilsson" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
news:3fedc775$(E-Mail Removed)...
> But more critically, a group considering a project that would actually
> _need_
> more than two (say) genuine C _experts_ should probably reconsider it's
> choice
> of programming language!


Something just occurred to me. Suppose a group of C experts clc style would
start out to create a windows program with Win32 and C. I think they would
be stressed out in a matter of weeks
Threads, writing to the registry, shoving windows around, dll's, that's not
portable!
_stdcall, _cdecl, casting longs to function pointers, WPARAM to CREATESTRUCT
* and a second time to int, oh my!


 
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John L
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      12-28-2003

"Servé Lau" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message news:bsn62b$1fv$(E-Mail Removed)1.nb.home.nl...
> "Peter Nilsson" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
> news:3fedc775$(E-Mail Removed)...
> > But more critically, a group considering a project that would actually
> > _need_
> > more than two (say) genuine C _experts_ should probably reconsider it's
> > choice
> > of programming language!

>
> Something just occurred to me. Suppose a group of C experts clc style would
> start out to create a windows program with Win32 and C. I think they would
> be stressed out in a matter of weeks
> Threads, writing to the registry, shoving windows around, dll's, that's not
> portable!
> _stdcall, _cdecl, casting longs to function pointers, WPARAM to CREATESTRUCT
> * and a second time to int, oh my!
>
>


More likely they would keep separate the platform-specific and
non-portable code from "official clc-approved ISO Standard C" code.

That way, when they, or their successors in eighteen months time,
come to port the program to a different platform or simply just
a different compiler or graphics library, it would be obvious
which parts need to be changed and which do not.

And after the port, they'd still have the portable, standard bit,
but now there would be two different (non-portable) modules
interfacing to two different platforms or databases or window
systems or whatever.

But, not being an expert, I'm just guessing.

John.


 
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