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[OT?] Pronunciation of "strcpy"

 
 
Joona I Palaste
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      09-06-2003
I was at the ESEC/FSE 2003 conference, and some people (American or
British or whatever) were giving a talk about their program which finds
buffer overflows in C code. Someone asked them a question about how they
detect buffer overflows in strcpy(). The person pronounced it something
like "stir-copy". Is this pronunciation often used? Are there others?

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cody
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      09-06-2003
"Str-Copy" or "String-Copy" as the name stands for that.

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"Joona I Palaste" <(E-Mail Removed)> schrieb im Newsbeitrag
news:bjd3go$i5t$(E-Mail Removed)...
> I was at the ESEC/FSE 2003 conference, and some people (American or
> British or whatever) were giving a talk about their program which finds
> buffer overflows in C code. Someone asked them a question about how they
> detect buffer overflows in strcpy(). The person pronounced it something
> like "stir-copy". Is this pronunciation often used? Are there others?



 
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Joona I Palaste
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      09-06-2003
cody <(E-Mail Removed)> scribbled the following:
> "Str-Copy" or "String-Copy" as the name stands for that.


How exactly do you say the "Str-Copy" pronunciation? "Es Tee Ar Copy"?
"Struhcopy"? Or how?

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Ben Pfaff
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      09-06-2003
Joona I Palaste <(E-Mail Removed)> writes:

> I was at the ESEC/FSE 2003 conference, and some people (American or
> British or whatever) were giving a talk about their program which finds
> buffer overflows in C code. Someone asked them a question about how they
> detect buffer overflows in strcpy(). The person pronounced it something
> like "stir-copy". Is this pronunciation often used? Are there others?


In my experience, "stir" is a common way to pronounce "str".
Sometimes I say "string" instead, but "string copy" sounds more
like a generic operation name than the name of a specific
function.
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You must understand the Tao before transcending structure."
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Mike Wahler
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      09-06-2003
Joona I Palaste <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
news:bjd3go$i5t$(E-Mail Removed)...
> I was at the ESEC/FSE 2003 conference, and some people (American or
> British or whatever) were giving a talk about their program which finds
> buffer overflows in C code. Someone asked them a question about how they
> detect buffer overflows in strcpy(). The person pronounced it something
> like "stir-copy". Is this pronunciation often used? Are there others?


The bytes are copied by stirring electrons [1], so
it's pronounced "stir copy."

[1] Beware of using 'strcpy()' when the source and
destination areas overlap. This can make the stirring
action cause the electrons to get too close together,
possibly resulting in a nuclear explosion. This actually
might or might not happen, so the language just calls the
behavior 'undefined'.


-Mike



 
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Irrwahn Grausewitz
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      09-06-2003
Joona I Palaste <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:

>I was at the ESEC/FSE 2003 conference, and some people (American or
>British or whatever) were giving a talk about their program which finds
>buffer overflows in C code. Someone asked them a question about how they
>detect buffer overflows in strcpy(). The person pronounced it something
>like "stir-copy". Is this pronunciation often used? Are there others?


As for me, I just pronounce it "Str-Copy" - no vowels in the
"Str"-part; sounds a bit like Polish or Russian.

Or just "String-Copy", of course.

Irrwahn
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cody
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      09-06-2003
> How exactly do you say the "Str-Copy" pronunciation? "Es Tee Ar Copy"?
> "Struhcopy"? Or how?


Str (pronounces exactly like string just without -ing)

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cody
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      09-06-2003

> The bytes are copied by stirring electrons [1], so
> it's pronounced "stir copy."
>
> [1] Beware of using 'strcpy()' when the source and
> destination areas overlap. This can make the stirring
> action cause the electrons to get too close together,
> possibly resulting in a nuclear explosion. This actually
> might or might not happen, so the language just calls the
> behavior 'undefined'.



muharhar

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Richard Heathfield
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      09-06-2003
Joona I Palaste wrote:

> I was at the ESEC/FSE 2003 conference, and some people (American or
> British or whatever) were giving a talk about their program which finds
> buffer overflows in C code. Someone asked them a question about how they
> detect buffer overflows in strcpy(). The person pronounced it something
> like "stir-copy". Is this pronunciation often used? Are there others?


I pronounce strcpy like this: strcpy

That is, "str" as in "string without the ing", and "cpy" as a hard c sound
followed by the "py" sound that you get in "copy". No "o" sound.

In other words, I pronounce it just as it is spelt. I concede that
introducing a short 'o' would do little or no damage to comprehension.

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Josh Sebastian
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      09-06-2003
On Sat, 06 Sep 2003 20:45:23 +0000, Richard Heathfield wrote:

> Joona I Palaste wrote:
>
>> I was at the ESEC/FSE 2003 conference, and some people (American or
>> British or whatever) were giving a talk about their program which finds
>> buffer overflows in C code. Someone asked them a question about how they
>> detect buffer overflows in strcpy(). The person pronounced it something
>> like "stir-copy". Is this pronunciation often used? Are there others?

>
> I pronounce strcpy like this: strcpy
>
> That is, "str" as in "string without the ing", and "cpy" as a hard c sound
> followed by the "py" sound that you get in "copy". No "o" sound.
>
> In other words, I pronounce it just as it is spelt. I concede that
> introducing a short 'o' would do little or no damage to comprehension.


Just as it's inevitable that a short vowel sound will be inserted between
the 'c' and the 'p' (as you alluded to), a short vowel sound also must be
inserted either between the 't' and the 'r' or the 'r' and the 'c':
"stir-copy" or "struh-copy". The main difference between these two
pronunciations is how the 't' sounds. In the former, we have a hard,
traditional 't', as found in "tail" and "state". In the latter, we have a
softer, more "ch"-like sound, as in "trail" or "strange".

Josh
 
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