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Windows easier to use...

 
 
Kelsey Bjarnason
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      07-22-2003
I'm online at the moment, trying to help someone with a programming
problem. His code, which isn't as bad as it could be, is trying to open a
file "file.in".

The file exists, is called "file.in" and is in the right place - but the
code won't open it - can't find the file.

Say what? Can't find the file? But it's right there, with the right
name, so why can't it find it?

Some poking around reveals the problem. First, the file was created with
notepad - which insists upon appending a .txt to everything. Fine so
far... but Windows Explorer *shows* the file as being simply "file.in" -
because the default setting is to hide file extensions.

So the user _sees_ "file.in" and can't tell what's going wrong - the fact
that the file is actually called "file.in.txt" and will never be found
with his application.

Ah, ease of use. Doesn't get any better than this.


 
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Kelsey Bjarnason
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      07-22-2003
On Mon, 21 Jul 2003 21:52:33 -0700, Kelsey Bjarnason wrote:

Arrgh. What is with this newsreader? Twice in one week, the post goes to
the wrong newsgroup... sigh.


 
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MG
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      07-22-2003
Well...the solution is that the file has the icon of that of a notepad ( or
that of the default pgm to open the .txt files)...
this is a common thing that pops up...

"Kelsey Bjarnason" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
news(E-Mail Removed) htspeed.bc.ca...
> I'm online at the moment, trying to help someone with a programming
> problem. His code, which isn't as bad as it could be, is trying to open a
> file "file.in".
>
> The file exists, is called "file.in" and is in the right place - but the
> code won't open it - can't find the file.
>
> Say what? Can't find the file? But it's right there, with the right
> name, so why can't it find it?
>
> Some poking around reveals the problem. First, the file was created with
> notepad - which insists upon appending a .txt to everything. Fine so
> far... but Windows Explorer *shows* the file as being simply "file.in" -
> because the default setting is to hide file extensions.
>
> So the user _sees_ "file.in" and can't tell what's going wrong - the fact
> that the file is actually called "file.in.txt" and will never be found
> with his application.
>
> Ah, ease of use. Doesn't get any better than this.
>
>



 
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Russell Hanneken
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      07-22-2003
<off-topic>

"Richard Heathfield" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
news:(E-Mail Removed)...
> Kelsey Bjarnason wrote:
>
> > Some poking around reveals the problem. First, the file was created
> > with notepad - which insists upon appending a .txt to everything.

>
> Suggested fix: remove notepad from your computer system.
>
> > Fine so far... but Windows Explorer *shows* the file as being simply
> > "file.in" - because the default setting is to hide file extensions.

>
> Suggested fix: remove Windows Explorer from your computer system.


I think I have a better solution:

In Windows 2000:

1. Select Start->Settings->Control Panel.
2. Double-click on "Folder Options."
3. Select the "View" tab.
4. Uncheck "Hide file extensions for known file types."

In Windows XP:

1. Select Start->Control Panel.
2. Select "Appearance and Themes."
3. Select "Folder Options."
4. Select the "View" tab.
5. Uncheck "Hide file extensions for known file types."

Definitely an irritating default setting. I've known several students who
have experienced exactly the same problem Kelsey did.

> Yesterday, I picked up a new computer for my sister, and set it up for
> her. We were horrified to discover that the operating system insisted on
> an Internet connection so that it could phone home. Since my sister
> doesn't /have/ an Internet connection, she has two choices - get one, in
> the next thirty days, or have an operating system, that she has paid for,
> refuse to "work" any more.


Are you talking about Windows XP and the "product activation" system? If
so, your sister does not have to have an Internet connection. See Myth #4
on this page:

http://www.microsoft.com/piracy/basi...tion/myths.asp

"Product Activation provides two methods to activate: Internet and
telephone. The Internet method requires that the PC be able to make a
connection to the Internet. The telephone method requires the user to
provide information to a customer service representative over the
telephone."

</off-topic>

--
Russell Hanneken
http://www.velocityreviews.com/forums/(E-Mail Removed)


 
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Richard Heathfield
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      07-22-2003
Kelsey Bjarnason wrote:

> I'm online at the moment, trying to help someone with a programming
> problem. His code, which isn't as bad as it could be, is trying to open a
> file "file.in".


Does it exist?

>
> The file exists,


Sure about that?

> is called "file.in"


Sure about that?

> and is in the right place - but the
> code won't open it - can't find the file.


Perhaps it doesn't exist, at least not by that name.

> Say what? Can't find the file? But it's right there, with the right
> name, so why can't it find it?


Perhaps it doesn't have the right name after all.

> Some poking around reveals the problem. First, the file was created with
> notepad - which insists upon appending a .txt to everything.


Suggested fix: remove notepad from your computer system.

> Fine so
> far... but Windows Explorer *shows* the file as being simply "file.in" -
> because the default setting is to hide file extensions.


Suggested fix: remove Windows Explorer from your computer system.

> So the user _sees_ "file.in" and can't tell what's going wrong - the fact
> that the file is actually called "file.in.txt" and will never be found
> with his application.


Write him a decent text editor. Well, a text editor better than Notepad.
This is strictly a two-banana problem.

> Ah, ease of use. Doesn't get any better than this.


Oh, but my dear chap, it does; it really, really does. Vastly better.
Incomparably better.

Yesterday, I picked up a new computer for my sister, and set it up for her.
We were horrified to discover that the operating system insisted on an
Internet connection so that it could phone home. Since my sister doesn't
/have/ an Internet connection, she has two choices - get one, in the next
thirty days, or have an operating system, that she has paid for, refuse to
"work" any more.

Unfortunately, she's already invested quite a lot of money in buying Windows
applications, so she's more or less locked in already.

--
Richard Heathfield : (E-Mail Removed)
"Usenet is a strange place." - Dennis M Ritchie, 29 July 1999.
C FAQ: http://www.eskimo.com/~scs/C-faq/top.html
K&R answers, C books, etc: http://users.powernet.co.uk/eton
 
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Joona I Palaste
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Posts: n/a
 
      07-22-2003
Russell Hanneken <(E-Mail Removed)> scribbled the following:
> <off-topic>


> "Richard Heathfield" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
> news:(E-Mail Removed)...
>> Yesterday, I picked up a new computer for my sister, and set it up for
>> her. We were horrified to discover that the operating system insisted on
>> an Internet connection so that it could phone home. Since my sister
>> doesn't /have/ an Internet connection, she has two choices - get one, in
>> the next thirty days, or have an operating system, that she has paid for,
>> refuse to "work" any more.


> Are you talking about Windows XP and the "product activation" system? If
> so, your sister does not have to have an Internet connection. See Myth #4
> on this page:


> http://www.microsoft.com/piracy/basi...tion/myths.asp


> "Product Activation provides two methods to activate: Internet and
> telephone. The Internet method requires that the PC be able to make a
> connection to the Internet. The telephone method requires the user to
> provide information to a customer service representative over the
> telephone."


> </off-topic>


And how would the Windows itself know that the information has been
provided, if there's no possibility of a data connection between it and
Microsoft? You could give your bank account number and bank card PIN to
Microsoft, and tell them it's all right to empty your whole bank account
into their pockets, and the Windows would be none the wiser, and accuse
you of stealing it.

--
/-- Joona Palaste ((E-Mail Removed)) ---------------------------\
| Kingpriest of "The Flying Lemon Tree" G++ FR FW+ M- #108 D+ ADA N+++|
| http://www.helsinki.fi/~palaste W++ B OP+ |
\----------------------------------------- Finland rules! ------------/
"A computer program does what you tell it to do, not what you want it to do."
- Anon
 
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Simon Biber
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Posts: n/a
 
      07-22-2003
"Joona I Palaste" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
> And how would the Windows itself know that the information has been
> provided, if there's no possibility of a data connection between it and
> Microsoft?


The client software generates a unique identifier for the particular
installation of Windows by looking at the CD Key, the timestamp plus
the hardware environment. You quote the unique identifier to the
phone operator who enters it into his/her terminal. Once you have
been identified and registered, the server generates the unlock code
corresponding to the given unique identifier. The phone operator
relays this back to the customer, who enters it into the text field
in the registration wizard.

This could link with public/private key cryptography -- the unlock
code is generated by microsoft encrypting the unique identifier with
its private key, and every copy of Windows contains the public key
with which it verifies the unlock code.

When the client validates that the unlock code matches the unique
identifier, if so, it knows that Microsoft generated it and so the
information has been provided.

--
Simon.


 
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Arthur J. O'Dwyer
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Posts: n/a
 
      07-22-2003

On Tue, 22 Jul 2003, Richard Heathfield wrote:
>
> Kelsey Bjarnason wrote:
> >
> > Some poking around reveals the problem. First, the file was created
> > with notepad - which insists upon appending a .txt to everything.

>
> Suggested fix: remove notepad from your computer system.
>
> > Fine so
> > far... but Windows Explorer *shows* the file as being simply "file.in"
> > - because the default setting is to hide file extensions.

>
> Suggested fix: remove Windows Explorer from your computer system.
>
> > So the user _sees_ "file.in" and can't tell what's going wrong - the fact
> > that the file is actually called "file.in.txt" and will never be found
> > with his application.

>
> Write him a decent text editor. Well, a text editor better than Notepad.
> This is strictly a two-banana problem.


Hmm. Judging from the popularity of Emacs, are you sure it's not
simply a "banana" problem?

http://wombat.doc.ic.ac.uk/foldoc/fo...banana+problem

-Arthur, poor fool,
who uses Notepad and likes it
 
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Tobias Oed
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Posts: n/a
 
      07-22-2003
Kelsey Bjarnason wrote:

> I'm online at the moment, trying to help someone with a programming
> problem. His code, which isn't as bad as it could be, is trying to open a
> file "file.in".
>
> The file exists, is called "file.in" and is in the right place - but the
> code won't open it - can't find the file.
>
> Say what? Can't find the file? But it's right there, with the right
> name, so why can't it find it?
>
> Some poking around reveals the problem. First, the file was created with
> notepad - which insists upon appending a .txt to everything.


<OT>
It is rumored that enclosing the file name in "" in the save as dialog will
prevent notepad from adding the .txt.
<\OT>

Tobias

--
unix http://www.faqs.org/faqs/by-newsgrou...rogrammer.html
clc http://www.eskimo.com/~scs/C-faq/top.html
fclc (french): http://www.isty-info.uvsq.fr/~rumeau/fclc/
 
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Richard Bos
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Posts: n/a
 
      07-22-2003
"Russell Hanneken" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:

> "Richard Heathfield" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
> news:(E-Mail Removed)...
> > Yesterday, I picked up a new computer for my sister, and set it up for
> > her. We were horrified to discover that the operating system insisted on
> > an Internet connection so that it could phone home. Since my sister
> > doesn't /have/ an Internet connection, she has two choices - get one, in
> > the next thirty days, or have an operating system, that she has paid for,
> > refuse to "work" any more.

>
> Are you talking about Windows XP and the "product activation" system? If
> so, your sister does not have to have an Internet connection. See Myth #4
> on this page:
>
> http://www.microsoft.com/piracy/basi...tion/myths.asp


Are we supposed to trust a page that states, amongst others, "Microsoft
absolutely respects the privacy of its customers"? 'Cause I don't, no
matter how pleasantly they smirk.

Richard
 
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