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raid drives?

 
 
mannock
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      01-06-2005
i'm looking for some new hard drives to use as raid setup, and i've
noticed among those for sale on the internet shops, some listed as ''raid
drives''. i had assumed that any matched pair of hard drives could be
used with a raid capable motherboard as a raid setup. what's different
about these?


 
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Drifter
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      01-06-2005
On Thu, 6 Jan 2005 18:18:31 +0000 (UTC), "mannock"
<(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:

>i'm looking for some new hard drives to use as raid setup, and i've
>noticed among those for sale on the internet shops, some listed as ''raid
>drives''. i had assumed that any matched pair of hard drives could be
>used with a raid capable motherboard as a raid setup. what's different
>about these?


advertising.


Drifter
"I've been here, I've been there..."
 
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JD
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      01-06-2005
mannock wrote:
> i'm looking for some new hard drives to use as raid setup, and i've
> noticed among those for sale on the internet shops, some listed as ''raid
> drives''. i had assumed that any matched pair of hard drives could be
> used with a raid capable motherboard as a raid setup. what's different
> about these?
>
>


For a RAID setup you will require 2 Identicle drives (I use Western
Digital Raptor 36.5Gb 10,000RPM 8mb cach SATA) you can use 2x(or more)
IDE/ATA or SATA (and lets not forget SCSII if you have a few quid)
provided you have an appropriate RAID card (motherboard or PCI) the
drives you have seen that are listed as "raid compatible" disable the
smart monitoring the Hard drive does (cluster mapping/repair) and lets
the controller card do it instead, the reason for this is that if you
have a raid setup and one of the drives starts remapping/cluster repairs
etc it can take a few seconds for it to respond in which time the
controller card may deem it as faulty and bin your raid..

I dont have the newer "RAID serie's" hard drives but they work fine and
i have had no problems (with ether ATA/IDE or SATA) so its all about
cost now .. buy whatever you can afford.
 
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derek / nul
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      01-07-2005
On Thu, 6 Jan 2005 18:18:31 +0000 (UTC), "mannock" <(E-Mail Removed)>
wrote:

>i'm looking for some new hard drives to use as raid setup, and i've
>noticed among those for sale on the internet shops, some listed as ''raid
>drives''. i had assumed that any matched pair of hard drives could be
>used with a raid capable motherboard as a raid setup. what's different
>about these?


nothing

 
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derek / nul
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      01-07-2005
On Thu, 06 Jan 2005 23:57:33 +0000, JD <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:

>mannock wrote:
>> i'm looking for some new hard drives to use as raid setup, and i've
>> noticed among those for sale on the internet shops, some listed as ''raid
>> drives''. i had assumed that any matched pair of hard drives could be
>> used with a raid capable motherboard as a raid setup. what's different
>> about these?
>>
>>

>
>For a RAID setup you will require 2 Identicle drives (I use Western


Not correct, any 2 drives can be used.
The raid number has not been mentioned so I will assume raid 1, as raid 0 is not
raid at all.

Using a 40Gb and a 30Gb on a raid 1 array, you can only get a 30Gb raid drive.


 
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Joe
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      01-07-2005

"derek / nul" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message

> Not correct, any 2 drives can be used.
> The raid number has not been mentioned so I will assume raid 1, as raid 0
> is not
> raid at all.


True. Raid 0 is not a Raid as raid stands for Redundant Arrays of
Inexpensive Disks and there is no redundancy in Raid 0 but it is refered to
as a Raid. Lets not confuse they guy.

Joe


 
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JD
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      01-07-2005
derek / nul wrote:

>>
>>For a RAID setup you will require 2 Identicle drives (I use Western

>
>
> Not correct, any 2 drives can be used.


I wrote that before going to bed your absaloutly correct however its
always recomended to use identicle drives so as the transfer speed is
the same! (ATA speeds and cach size's differ on hard drives as does the
expected hour lifespan of a dirve) besides he is looking for "some
drives" therefore it would not be beneficial to buy different drives.

> The raid number has not been mentioned so I will assume raid 1, as raid 0 is not
> raid at all.


True but i was on the assumption it was going to be RAID 0 (most common
one used on home system's) I guess hes probably trying to build a
performance gaming machine (correct me if I'm wrong)

and theres no redundancy on "RAID JABOD" ether.

> Using a 40Gb and a 30Gb on a raid 1 array, you can only get a 30Gb raid drive.


Waste of a good 10 gig


 
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Trey
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      01-07-2005
derek / nul wrote:
> On Thu, 06 Jan 2005 23:57:33 +0000, JD <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
>
>> mannock wrote:
>>> i'm looking for some new hard drives to use as raid setup, and
>>> i've noticed among those for sale on the internet shops, some
>>> listed as ''raid drives''. i had assumed that any matched pair
>>> of hard drives could be used with a raid capable motherboard as a
>>> raid setup. what's different about these?
>>>
>>>

>>
>> For a RAID setup you will require 2 Identicle drives (I use Western

>
> Not correct, any 2 drives can be used.
> The raid number has not been mentioned so I will assume raid 1, as
> raid 0 is not raid at all.
>
> Using a 40Gb and a 30Gb on a raid 1 array, you can only get a 30Gb
> raid drive.


Raid 0 can be referred to as "AID" since its not a "Redundant Array"


 
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mannock
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      01-07-2005
great, thanks folks.


 
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derek / nul
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      01-07-2005
On Fri, 07 Jan 2005 15:26:28 +0000, JD <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:

>derek / nul wrote:
>
>>>
>>>For a RAID setup you will require 2 Identicle drives (I use Western

>>
>>
>> Not correct, any 2 drives can be used.

>
>I wrote that before going to bed your absaloutly correct however its
>always recomended to use identicle drives so as the transfer speed is
>the same!


Again, it doesn't matter. Make sure the faster drive is the primary, the
firmware handles the writes to the second drive differently, they are written
after the primary drive.

> (ATA speeds and cach size's differ on hard drives as does the
>expected hour lifespan of a dirve) besides he is looking for "some
>drives" therefore it would not be beneficial to buy different drives.


 
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