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Connecting a Hard Drive via a caddy

 
 
me
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      10-29-2004

"Thor" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
news:(E-Mail Removed)...
>
> "Robert Baer" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
> news:(E-Mail Removed)...
> > Thagor wrote:
> >>
> >> "me" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in news:FE0gd.35217$_g6.21955@okepread03:
> >>
> >> > Actually i have another question.Once i have got the files i need
> >> > accross from the old drive(I'll probably get an enclosure for it),i
> >> > may want to get a new drive to put in the enclosure,and just use it
> >> > for external storage.OK,do i have to format this new drive the same
> >> > way as if i were formatting drive C for example ?
> >> >
> >> > thanks again
> >> > Andrew
> >> >
> >> >
> >> >
> >>
> >> Yes. Temperarily Hook it up directly to the computer and do the
> >> partitioning/format just as you would a normal internal IDE drive. Then
> >> install it in the case, (without covers) and hook it up to USB to

verify
> >> that it works. Note that you can make the drive ready through the USB
> >> port control but for the first time I always go direct to IDE cable as

a
> >> personal preference.

> >
> > And a direct IDE connection is a *LOT* faster!

>
> if you are speaking in terms of mere throughput, it's not that much faster
> than an external USB 2.0 drive. USB 2.0 is capable of 60MB/sec throughput.

I
> find that my external USB 2.0 drives tend to respond and perform almost as
> fast as my internal ATA-100 drives when transferring data to and from
> various drives.
>
>
>


Plus the USB-based drive is only going to be a secondary storage unit
anyway,mainly for storing videos temporarily and keep the space free on my
main C drive.

Thor,the drive i have on my PC now is an supposedly 80 gig,I have C and D
drives on it,C is NTFS and is 67 gigs,and D is FAT32 and is 8 gigs (I dont
know how they work out that to be 80gig,but there you go.) So does that mean
that it is one drive that is partitioned? I dont really undertand the
importance of that,I've never had to format a hard drive,someone else has
always done it for me.
Why didnt they just leave it all as C drive instead of splitting it up? I
never use the D drive.



Andrew


 
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derek / nul
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      10-29-2004
On Fri, 29 Oct 2004 07:32:18 -0400, "Thor" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:

>if you are speaking in terms of mere throughput, it's not that much faster
>than an external USB 2.0 drive. USB 2.0 is capable of 60MB/sec throughput.


I wish for speed like that, I can only get 20MB/s (with an 80GB drive)
 
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Thor
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      10-30-2004
> Thor,the drive i have on my PC now is an supposedly 80 gig,I have C and D
> drives on it,C is NTFS and is 67 gigs,and D is FAT32 and is 8 gigs (I dont
> know how they work out that to be 80gig,but there you go.)


it's the difference in two methods of how the drive's capacity is
determined. The drive manufacturer measures capacity using Base 10
calculation (for example 1GB=1000MB) but software usually displays capacity
and memory using Base 2 binary calculation (1GB=1024MB). So a drive that is
advertised as 80GB is measured as ~74GB by the operating system software in
most cases.

> So does that mean
> that it is one drive that is partitioned?


Yes.

> I dont really undertand the
> importance of that,I've never had to format a hard drive,someone else has
> always done it for me.
> Why didnt they just leave it all as C drive instead of splitting it up? I
> never use the D drive.


most likely, the smaller second partition is a repository for a factory
system recovery file archive. Very commonplace with factory-built PCs. When
you run the system recovery, the files archived on that partition are used
to reconstruct the software to a factory original configuration. This makes
the recovery process much quicker, but the downfall is that if the harddrive
fails, you lose the recovery files. A good manufacturer would supply CDs in
place of, or in addition to a harddrive-based recovery system, just in case
of a harddrive failure. Some manufacturers (like HP) usually do not.



 
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me
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Posts: n/a
 
      10-30-2004

"Thor" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
news:(E-Mail Removed)...
> > Thor,the drive i have on my PC now is an supposedly 80 gig,I have C and

D
> > drives on it,C is NTFS and is 67 gigs,and D is FAT32 and is 8 gigs (I

dont
> > know how they work out that to be 80gig,but there you go.)

>
> it's the difference in two methods of how the drive's capacity is
> determined. The drive manufacturer measures capacity using Base 10
> calculation (for example 1GB=1000MB) but software usually displays

capacity
> and memory using Base 2 binary calculation (1GB=1024MB). So a drive that

is
> advertised as 80GB is measured as ~74GB by the operating system software

in
> most cases.
>
> > So does that mean
> > that it is one drive that is partitioned?

>
> Yes.
>
> > I dont really undertand the
> > importance of that,I've never had to format a hard drive,someone else

has
> > always done it for me.
> > Why didnt they just leave it all as C drive instead of splitting it up?

I
> > never use the D drive.

>
> most likely, the smaller second partition is a repository for a factory
> system recovery file archive. Very commonplace with factory-built PCs.

When
> you run the system recovery, the files archived on that partition are used
> to reconstruct the software to a factory original configuration. This

makes
> the recovery process much quicker, but the downfall is that if the

harddrive
> fails, you lose the recovery files. A good manufacturer would supply CDs

in
> place of, or in addition to a harddrive-based recovery system, just in

case
> of a harddrive failure. Some manufacturers (like HP) usually do not.
>
>
>


Well considering that this is a Compaq bought through HP .......

Also, i checked out the files on D and it does contain the recovery files..

On D there is 5.9 gb free space,but as it is in FAt32,is it advisable that i
shouldnt use this for saving.storing files,or would it not matter?I wasnt
sure so i never used it to save anything.



Andrew


 
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Robert Baer
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Posts: n/a
 
      10-30-2004
Thor wrote:
>
> "Robert Baer" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
> news:(E-Mail Removed)...
> > Thagor wrote:
> >>
> >> "me" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in news:FE0gd.35217$_g6.21955@okepread03:
> >>
> >> > Actually i have another question.Once i have got the files i need
> >> > accross from the old drive(I'll probably get an enclosure for it),i
> >> > may want to get a new drive to put in the enclosure,and just use it
> >> > for external storage.OK,do i have to format this new drive the same
> >> > way as if i were formatting drive C for example ?
> >> >
> >> > thanks again
> >> > Andrew
> >> >
> >> >
> >> >
> >>
> >> Yes. Temperarily Hook it up directly to the computer and do the
> >> partitioning/format just as you would a normal internal IDE drive. Then
> >> install it in the case, (without covers) and hook it up to USB to verify
> >> that it works. Note that you can make the drive ready through the USB
> >> port control but for the first time I always go direct to IDE cable as a
> >> personal preference.

> >
> > And a direct IDE connection is a *LOT* faster!

>
> if you are speaking in terms of mere throughput, it's not that much faster
> than an external USB 2.0 drive. USB 2.0 is capable of 60MB/sec throughput. I
> find that my external USB 2.0 drives tend to respond and perform almost as
> fast as my internal ATA-100 drives when transferring data to and from
> various drives.


I found the relative speed to be 2-3 times slower, especially on
*large* files.
 
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Trent©
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      10-31-2004
On Sun, 31 Oct 2004 07:53:22 -0500, "Thor" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:

><snip>...but I'd prefer to keep the drive
>safely in it's enclosure, and use the USB 2.0 connection when I back up my
>important files.


Or simply use an IDE caddy.


Have a nice one...

Trent

Budweiser: Helping ugly people have sex since 1876!
 
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Robert Baer
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      11-01-2004
"Trent©" wrote:
>
> On Sun, 31 Oct 2004 07:53:22 -0500, "Thor" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
>
> ><snip>...but I'd prefer to keep the drive
> >safely in it's enclosure, and use the USB 2.0 connection when I back up my
> >important files.

>
> Or simply use an IDE caddy.
>
> Have a nice one...
>
> Trent
>

Ayie-yup! Jess whut eye dew!
 
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Thor
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      11-01-2004

"Trent©" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
news:(E-Mail Removed)...
> On Sun, 31 Oct 2004 07:53:22 -0500, "Thor" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
>
>><snip>...but I'd prefer to keep the drive
>>safely in it's enclosure, and use the USB 2.0 connection when I back up my
>>important files.

>
> Or simply use an IDE caddy.


I don't prefer them.


 
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HF
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      11-08-2004
Ebuyer have got them - just bought one - has it's own power supply.
"me" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message news:5bTfd.35130$_g6.1612@okepread03...
> Hi group,
>
> I have my old hard drive from my previous PC,and i would like to access

the
> files on it without having to install it inside my current PC.(Which
> apparently i cant anyway becasue it's a Compaq and you have to go through
> them to do upgrades.)
>
> I read on a forum that i can get a disk caddy which i can hook it to,power
> it up externally and connect it to my current PC via USB cable.
> I tried looking online for these caddies but i can only seem to see ones

for
> laptop HD's. Can anyone suggest what i would need to do this,and what type
> of cable i would need?
>
> The Hard drive in question is a Maxtor 541DX,and under "Model" it says
> 2B020H1 (not sure if the 0's in that code are alphabet O's or Zero's)
>
> Also,the hard drive has Windows 98 OS on it,whilst my current PC runs
> XP.Will there be any conflict while trying to view the files on the

Maxtor?
>
> I have posted this request in a couple of other relevant groups also.
> thanks in advance for any replies
>
> Andrew
>
>



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