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Can a BIOS tell the difference between 45ns RDRAM and 40ns RDRAM?

 
 
Scott Gardner
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      05-08-2004
I'm trying to add more memory to a Dell Dimension 8200, with a P4 2.26
GHZ CPU. The memory requirements are PC800 RDRAM, 40 ns or faster.
I didn't know about the 40ns part until after I bought the new RAM,
which is evidently 45ns. The new modules are 256MB modules, a size
which I know the 8200 supports.

When I install the RAM, I get an error message at bootup that says
"Unsupported memory detected in slots 1 and 2 (or 3 and 4, depending
on where I put the new RAM) - please remove and replace with PC800
RDRAM, 40ns or faster"

I don't have another RDRAM-equipped computer to test the new modules
in, so I can't swear they're good. I ordered them online, so I'd like
to do some more troubleshooting before I send them back.

If the new modules are really good, and the only problem is that
they're 5ns too slow, would the BIOS be able to detect this? In the
past, whenever I've installed RAM that was marginally too slow, it
either worked fine, or would only give errors while running
memory-intensive programs. This computer, on the other hand, won't
even boot up. Do RDRAM modules somehow "report" their speed to the
BIOS on bootup?

The Dell has the latest BIOS flashed on it, and the problem is
happening whether I have the new modules in slots 1 and 2 with CRIMMS
in 3 and 4, CRIMMS in 1 and 2 with the new RAM in 3 and 4, or with the
original 128MB modules in either pair with the new RAM in the other
pair of slots.

Also, the Dell website says that the replacement RAM for the 8200 is
ECC-type, but the original 128Mb modules are non-ECC, so I think it
can take either type.

Thanks for any help,
Scott Gardner


 
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Thor
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      05-08-2004
> If the new modules are really good, and the only problem is that
> they're 5ns too slow, would the BIOS be able to detect this? In the
> past, whenever I've installed RAM that was marginally too slow, it
> either worked fine, or would only give errors while running
> memory-intensive programs. This computer, on the other hand, won't
> even boot up. Do RDRAM modules somehow "report" their speed to the
> BIOS on bootup?


Yes, and so does SDRAM, and it has for several years now. There is a chip on
the module that carries the specifications of the module, so the BIOS can
query it and set timing parameters accordingly. It's called a Serial
Presence Detect (SPD) chip.



 
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Scott Gardner
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      05-08-2004
On Sat, 8 May 2004 15:17:08 -0400, "Thor" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:

>> If the new modules are really good, and the only problem is that
>> they're 5ns too slow, would the BIOS be able to detect this? In the
>> past, whenever I've installed RAM that was marginally too slow, it
>> either worked fine, or would only give errors while running
>> memory-intensive programs. This computer, on the other hand, won't
>> even boot up. Do RDRAM modules somehow "report" their speed to the
>> BIOS on bootup?

>
>Yes, and so does SDRAM, and it has for several years now. There is a chip on
>the module that carries the specifications of the module, so the BIOS can
>query it and set timing parameters accordingly. It's called a Serial
>Presence Detect (SPD) chip.
>
>

Thanks for the quick, helpful reply. I guess I need to send these
back and get some 40ns modules, then. I never thought I'd run into
speed problems putting modern RAM in a two-year-old computer.
Usually, even run-of-the-mill new stuff is more than fast enough to
work with a computer that's a couple years old. Maybe since RDRAM
isn't used much anymore, they haven't really advanced the way other
types of RAM have.

Scott Gardner

 
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Hoffman
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      05-09-2004
I hope you don't have a problem returning the ram. Ram is often not
returnable.

Larry.

"Scott Gardner" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
news:(E-Mail Removed)...
> On Sat, 8 May 2004 15:17:08 -0400, "Thor" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
>
> >> If the new modules are really good, and the only problem is that
> >> they're 5ns too slow, would the BIOS be able to detect this? In the
> >> past, whenever I've installed RAM that was marginally too slow, it
> >> either worked fine, or would only give errors while running
> >> memory-intensive programs. This computer, on the other hand, won't
> >> even boot up. Do RDRAM modules somehow "report" their speed to the
> >> BIOS on bootup?

> >
> >Yes, and so does SDRAM, and it has for several years now. There is a chip

on
> >the module that carries the specifications of the module, so the BIOS can
> >query it and set timing parameters accordingly. It's called a Serial
> >Presence Detect (SPD) chip.
> >
> >

> Thanks for the quick, helpful reply. I guess I need to send these
> back and get some 40ns modules, then. I never thought I'd run into
> speed problems putting modern RAM in a two-year-old computer.
> Usually, even run-of-the-mill new stuff is more than fast enough to
> work with a computer that's a couple years old. Maybe since RDRAM
> isn't used much anymore, they haven't really advanced the way other
> types of RAM have.
>
> Scott Gardner
>



 
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Scott Gardner
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      05-09-2004
Me too. I'm hoping the seller will be willing to take the 45ns
modules back and sell me 40ns modules. If not, it looks like I'll
have to take a loss selling them on eBay.

Scott Gardner


On Sun, 09 May 2004 02:50:45 GMT, "Hoffman" <(E-Mail Removed)>
wrote:

>I hope you don't have a problem returning the ram. Ram is often not
>returnable.
>
>Larry.
>
>"Scott Gardner" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
>news:(E-Mail Removed).. .
>> On Sat, 8 May 2004 15:17:08 -0400, "Thor" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
>>
>> >> If the new modules are really good, and the only problem is that
>> >> they're 5ns too slow, would the BIOS be able to detect this? In the
>> >> past, whenever I've installed RAM that was marginally too slow, it
>> >> either worked fine, or would only give errors while running
>> >> memory-intensive programs. This computer, on the other hand, won't
>> >> even boot up. Do RDRAM modules somehow "report" their speed to the
>> >> BIOS on bootup?
>> >
>> >Yes, and so does SDRAM, and it has for several years now. There is a chip

>on
>> >the module that carries the specifications of the module, so the BIOS can
>> >query it and set timing parameters accordingly. It's called a Serial
>> >Presence Detect (SPD) chip.
>> >
>> >

>> Thanks for the quick, helpful reply. I guess I need to send these
>> back and get some 40ns modules, then. I never thought I'd run into
>> speed problems putting modern RAM in a two-year-old computer.
>> Usually, even run-of-the-mill new stuff is more than fast enough to
>> work with a computer that's a couple years old. Maybe since RDRAM
>> isn't used much anymore, they haven't really advanced the way other
>> types of RAM have.
>>
>> Scott Gardner
>>

>


 
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John H. Power
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Posts: n/a
 
      05-09-2004
On Sat, 8 May 2004 15:17:08 -0400, "Thor" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:

>> If the new modules are really good, and the only problem is that
>> they're 5ns too slow, would the BIOS be able to detect this? In the
>> past, whenever I've installed RAM that was marginally too slow, it
>> either worked fine, or would only give errors while running
>> memory-intensive programs. This computer, on the other hand, won't
>> even boot up. Do RDRAM modules somehow "report" their speed to the
>> BIOS on bootup?

>
>Yes, and so does SDRAM, and it has for several years now. There is a chip on
>the module that carries the specifications of the module, so the BIOS can
>query it and set timing parameters accordingly. It's called a Serial
>Presence Detect (SPD) chip.
>
>

Good job once more Thor. As usual, you come through with a succinct,
accurate response that saves the questioner a lot of time looking for
an answer.....You have certainly done that for me on several occasions
and I appreciate it.

Each NG has its core of experts who help the rest of us. I have often
wished I could reciprocate in order to show my gratitude to those NG
"anchors" who share their knowledge but very few people have or want
search and seizure issues to contend with...
 
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Thor
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      05-09-2004

"John H. Power" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
news:(E-Mail Removed)...
> On Sat, 8 May 2004 15:17:08 -0400, "Thor" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
>
> >> If the new modules are really good, and the only problem is that
> >> they're 5ns too slow, would the BIOS be able to detect this? In the
> >> past, whenever I've installed RAM that was marginally too slow, it
> >> either worked fine, or would only give errors while running
> >> memory-intensive programs. This computer, on the other hand, won't
> >> even boot up. Do RDRAM modules somehow "report" their speed to the
> >> BIOS on bootup?

> >
> >Yes, and so does SDRAM, and it has for several years now. There is a chip

on
> >the module that carries the specifications of the module, so the BIOS can
> >query it and set timing parameters accordingly. It's called a Serial
> >Presence Detect (SPD) chip.
> >
> >

> Good job once more Thor. As usual, you come through with a succinct,
> accurate response that saves the questioner a lot of time looking for
> an answer.....You have certainly done that for me on several occasions
> and I appreciate it.
>
> Each NG has its core of experts who help the rest of us. I have often
> wished I could reciprocate in order to show my gratitude to those NG
> "anchors" who share their knowledge but very few people have or want
> search and seizure issues to contend with...


Thanks for the kind words.


 
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Plato
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      05-10-2004
Thor wrote:
>
> Thanks for the kind words.


Yeah, put them on the statue of you that commissioned in marble for the
Town Green.

ps Are you on horseback for this one or just holding a lightning bolt as
usual?


 
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Thor
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      05-10-2004

"Plato" <|@|.|> wrote in message
news:409f0ef5$0$35197$(E-Mail Removed)...
> Thor wrote:
> >
> > Thanks for the kind words.

>
> Yeah, put them on the statue of you that commissioned in marble for the
> Town Green.
>
> ps Are you on horseback for this one or just holding a lightning bolt as
> usual?
>
>


LOL!


 
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