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power supply ventilator

 
 
kwijlebabulus
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      02-03-2004
hello folks

my ventilator in the powersupply is making very much noise

can i put any other fan in the supply, or is it a special one?

i have a 300Watt supply

tia
greets kwijl

 
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Alex Devlin
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      02-03-2004
On 03 Feb 2004, kwijlebabulus wrote:

> hello folks
>
> my ventilator in the powersupply is making very much noise
>
> can i put any other fan in the supply, or is it a special one?
>
> i have a 300Watt supply
>
> tia
> greets kwijl


First, check some prices for a new power supply at online PC stores.
They're not that expensive. But if you wish to replace the fan then have
a look at your power supply and find out who makes it and what model it
is. Start at their website first and see if it's possible. I'm not sure
if you can replace the fans easily or at all in them. Another possibility
is to find an electronics supplier and see if they have a fan meeting
your requirements. Again it will come down to price of replacement of fan
over replacement of power supply.

--
Alex Devlin

Good friends will bail you out of jail...
... True friends will be sitting there with you saying "Damn. That was
fun!"
 
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Plato
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      02-03-2004
kwijlebabulus wrote:
>
> my ventilator in the powersupply is making very much noise
>
> can i put any other fan in the supply, or is it a special one?


Generally it's a standard 3X3 inch fan. Most often tho it's soldered to
the board. But yes, one can spice the wires and replace it no problem.


--
http://www.bootdisk.com/
 
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kwijlebabulus
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      02-03-2004

hello plato

does it matter at what speed the fan is turning?
or is a standard fan enough??
a standard fan here costs about 6 and its ment to be placed in the case
for ventilation

greets kwijl

 
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Thor
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      02-04-2004
A standard 80mm 12V DC fan is fine. Direct it the same way the old fan was
blowing. Some power supplies use temperature controlled fans, but a standard
replacement fan should work just fine.

...
"kwijlebabulus" <"alexander_rickert(remove)"@pandora.be> wrote in message
news:(E-Mail Removed)...
>
> hello plato
>
> does it matter at what speed the fan is turning?
> or is a standard fan enough??
> a standard fan here costs about 6 ? and its ment to be placed in the case
> for ventilation
>
> greets kwijl
>



 
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Drifter
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      02-04-2004
>A standard 80mm 12V DC fan is fine. Direct it the same way the old fan was
>blowing. Some power supplies use temperature controlled fans, but a standard
>replacement fan should work just fine.


Isn't anyone going to give him the standard warning about the
capacitors and high voltage???

Drifter
 
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labatyd
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      02-04-2004

"Drifter" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
news:(E-Mail Removed)...
> >A standard 80mm 12V DC fan is fine. Direct it the same way the old fan

was
> >blowing. Some power supplies use temperature controlled fans, but a

standard
> >replacement fan should work just fine.

>
> Isn't anyone going to give him the standard warning about the
> capacitors and high voltage???
>
> Drifter


How high a voltage? 120 volts AC is probably the highest. Surely he won't
work on it when it's plugged into an outlet. <g>


 
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Drifter
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      02-04-2004
>
>"Drifter" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
>news:(E-Mail Removed).. .
>> >A standard 80mm 12V DC fan is fine. Direct it the same way the old fan

>was
>> >blowing. Some power supplies use temperature controlled fans, but a

>standard
>> >replacement fan should work just fine.

>>
>> Isn't anyone going to give him the standard warning about the
>> capacitors and high voltage???
>>
>> Drifter

>
>How high a voltage? 120 volts AC is probably the highest. Surely he won't
>work on it when it's plugged into an outlet. <g>


Doesn't matter if it's plugged in if he opens things up and shorts out
a capacitor. They can retain a charge for weeks/years.

Drifter
 
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Thor
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      02-04-2004

"Drifter" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
news:(E-Mail Removed)...
> >
> >"Drifter" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
> >news:(E-Mail Removed).. .
> >> >A standard 80mm 12V DC fan is fine. Direct it the same way the old fan

> >was
> >> >blowing. Some power supplies use temperature controlled fans, but a

> >standard
> >> >replacement fan should work just fine.
> >>
> >> Isn't anyone going to give him the standard warning about the
> >> capacitors and high voltage???
> >>
> >> Drifter

> >
> >How high a voltage? 120 volts AC is probably the highest. Surely he won't
> >work on it when it's plugged into an outlet. <g>

>
> Doesn't matter if it's plugged in if he opens things up and shorts out
> a capacitor. They can retain a charge for weeks/years.


Can? yes. Likely to? No. If the supply is operating normally, they should
discharge themselves when the power is removed. Additionally, the larger
capacitor contacts are almost always difficult to touch or accidentally come
into contact with, unless you try and remove the entire main circuit board
from the supply exposing the underside. Something that is difficult to do,
and not necessary for putting in a new fan. IMHO the risk of shock is
minimal.


 
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labatyd
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      02-04-2004

"Drifter" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
news:(E-Mail Removed)...
> >
> >"Drifter" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
> >news:(E-Mail Removed).. .
> >> >A standard 80mm 12V DC fan is fine. Direct it the same way the old fan

> >was
> >> >blowing. Some power supplies use temperature controlled fans, but a

> >standard
> >> >replacement fan should work just fine.
> >>
> >> Isn't anyone going to give him the standard warning about the
> >> capacitors and high voltage???
> >>
> >> Drifter

> >
> >How high a voltage? 120 volts AC is probably the highest. Surely he won't
> >work on it when it's plugged into an outlet. <g>

>
> Doesn't matter if it's plugged in if he opens things up and shorts out
> a capacitor. They can retain a charge for weeks/years.
>
> Drifter


Na not that dangerous. I've been around this stuff for 40+ years.


 
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